In case of emergency...

dan200

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Started in Sportsman after many years racing bikes. Worked our way up to Class 10 and 12 with a few temp stops along the way
I feel like this is not gonna be the norm. When the conversations here become about "People need to work their way up through the classes" and "we need a licensing system" I always flex back and fourth on agreeing and disagreeing with those ideas. It does make sense but it's my gut feeling that it is hypocritical sometimes. And where would it start? Should ya just get to go run 1600? Or should ya have to run a class nine first? And an 11 before that? And maybe a go kart before that? And how are they gonna pay for all those cars?

And I truly feel that a high percentage of off road racers did not earn their way into the class they are racing but at the same time advocate that others should have to do just that.

I would bet a mandatory etiquette and protocol class would do more good than the licensing idea. Maybe I am wrong...
 

jon coleman

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desert racing itself used to be the tier system, fast guys up front, us mortals to the rear,point to point, then sweep would pick up the broken dreams, a do's& don'ts noobie class would be a good start, also some kind of ' book' of desert racing safety& protocols, that Every entrant buys at the start of the year in thier entry fee
 

dan200

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desert racing itself used to be the tier system, fast guys up front, us mortals to the rear,point to point, then sweep would pick up the broken dreams, a do's& don'ts noobie class would be a good start, also some kind of ' book' of desert racing safety& protocols, that Every entrant buys at the start of the year in thier entry fee
Books? Nobody uses those anymore LOL

Maybe a online test ya have to pass once a year in order to race? For all banded drivers and codrivers.
 

Bro_Gill

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Ha! Entry level classes. 1600 used to be the entry level class when one or 2 of those would finish top 10 overall at many races. For me, drove a 1600 car (not mine) a couple times before I could afford to build my own 9 car, but had been driving a glass buggy and a Baja Bug 5 style prerunner as my street cars and play cars during that time. Then another 9 car then moved into a 7s. You know what? It wasn't really any faster than the 9 car and definitely not faster than a 1600 at Barstow. Then some 10 car and 1600 car again and then 11. But that was what I could afford to race without leaving my family eating Top Ramen and Spaghettios. The finance deal is really what has changed things, first it was folks cashing out their house for the fastest car they could afford and now it is straight up financing a race car, whether it be a SxS or a Brenthal. No experience needed.
 

Big Whitey

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Out of curiosity, how many reading this post feel like they came into the sport at an "entry level" and then progressed into a faster class? Or did you build or buy the vehicle you wanted and then just jumped into the mix?
I can honestly say that. A class 9 for a toy, 1600 for a couple years then 10 and 5u and a class 2 back when that was a class
 

ACME

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In this day and age where instant gratification is part of current societies DNA: Thinking that people will buy into starter classes seems foolish.

IMO to race in the top tiers you should have experience and a clue and not be allowed to compete simply on your fiscal ability to buy your way in. You should have to prove competency as you do in other forms of motorsports. The other thing lacking is consistant standards across all governing bodies. But then they can't even agree on standardized classes...

The issue is big money is impatient and what promotor is willing to turn away racers? Especially wealthy ones that feed the classes they feel are the most important.

But then a guy with no clue can also buy and race a 700HP unlimited door slammer that has the same potential for disaster. As well as a person can also buy a 9, 1600 or SXS and make bad decisions that can have significant consequences.

It seems the only consistent fact in this sport, is that we can count on the bulkbof the community and promoters to not consider the long term, best interests of the sport. But rather they look at short term gains and indulge special interests or fashion.

Aside from licensing at the top tiers: A great first step given these facts is having good drivers meetings as well as require all rookie DORs and their Pit Captains to attend a clinic prior to the drivers meeting. More needs to be done to train the untrained to hopefully understand best practices and make good decisions while in cars, chasing and in the pits.

Sadly we also need to realize that in this form of motorsports, you cannot eliminate all the risk as people ultimatley must make good decisions. However, not learning from every incident and attempting to improve the situations is unacceptable and will seal the fate of the sport.

Thanks for a very constructive thread!
 
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jon coleman

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kinda of almost saying better go to the rookie meeting before you go to the Glamis sand drags in your 1200hp sand truck for the first time, some people know it All....
 

Bricoop

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In this day and age where instant gratification is part of current societies DNA: Thinking that people will buy into starter classes seems foolish.

IMO to race in the top tiers you should have experience and a clue and not be allowed to compete simply on your fiscal ability to buy your way in. You should have to prove competency as you do in other forms of motorsports. The other thing lacking is consistant standards across all governing bodies. But then they can't even agree on standardized classes...

The issue is big money is impatient and what promotor is willing to turn away racers? Especially wealthy ones that feed the classes they feel are the most important.

But then a guy with no clue can also buy and race a 700HP unlimited door slammer that has the same potential for disaster. As well as a person can also buy a 9, 1600 or SXS and make bad decisions that can have significant consequences.

It seems the only consistent fact in this sport, is that we can count on the bulkbof the community and promoters to not consider the long term, best interests of the sport. But rather they look at short term gains and indulge special interests or fashion.

Aside from licensing at the top tiers: A great first step given these facts is having good drivers meetings as well as require all rookie DORs and their Pit Captains to attend a clinic prior to the drivers meeting. More needs to be done to train the untrained to hopefully understand best practices and make good decisions while in cars, chasing and in the pits.

Sadly we also need to realize that in this form of motorsports, you cannot eliminate all the risk as people ultimatley must make good decisions. However, not learning from every incident and attempting to improve the situations is unacceptable and will seal the fate of the sport.

Thanks for a very constructive thread!
Are there any other forms or motor sports where the only barrier to entry to the top tier is a fat check?

In my mind this is one of the biggest risks to the long term viability of the sport. Even an idiot’s actions in a UTV could threaten the sport with today’s cameras and the state of tort law. Would an insurance underwriter continue to renew the policy if there was a 9 figure payout?
 

johndjmix

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The day I bought my UTV, having never rode a modern UTV….I unloaded it from the trailer, hit the throttle and was like “oh my god, people are going to hurt themselves”.

If you’ve never raced ATV’s, bikes, cars, etc and you get on a new UTV with that much power, you are almost certainly going to get into trouble.

—job.
 

Josh 8

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Out of curiosity, how many reading this post feel like they came into the sport at an "entry level" and then progressed into a faster class? Or did you build or buy the vehicle you wanted and then just jumped into the mix?
Back about 01 I knew class 8 is what I wanted to do and it is all I wantto do so I bought one. 20 years later am still doing it. There was a hiatuses in there for about 8 years as life changed but I stuck with it.

The original truck was a slow pos. This kept my speeds down in the beginning. But I took the torch to it and made it faster in increments. It was learning process for me.

To answer you question I would say I am a 50/50 case.

I had some D37 time too on a bike. This helped a lot.
 

MTPyle

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I don’t think it matters what type of racing someone starts in. There are stupid people in any category.

the issue is UTV’s seem to be the point of entry so that’s getting a higher percentage of idiots.

We looked at all classes before we bought our 6100. We went 6100 because it’s bigger and safer. Plus we are all 6’5” and could not fit in many other classes. I don’t think it would have mattered what class we started in. We were rookies no matter what. We worked hard to learn as much as possible. Still made a lot of rookie mistakes.

In sprint cars they make rookies have a flag on the back so everyone knows they are racing next to a rookie. I think that’s a good idea for desert racing. Then veterans knowwho to help.

Maybe you have to have the rookie flag on for
Your first 4 races or something like that. Or so many races and complete a online course. Lots of ways to help rookies learn the easy way.

Mike
 

Josh 8

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Josh. I would say the D37 counts as credits , makes you 100%
Awww, I have been waiting so long to earn rdc credits and be categorized as 💯!

🎉🎉🎉🎉 # Best day every! I have key board clout! 🏆🏆🏆🏆
 

jon coleman

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hmmm, how IS the rDc ' social credit score ' scoreboard?, ie who got the most donkeys?, smileys?, ect...
 

green787

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Anyone that started racing in D37 is an expert.... pro.... I was only a motocrosser at much slower speeds.....
 

trailready

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" That is different from a response time and involved pre- flight of the aircraft and fuel. That will regularly add 15-18 minutes when fuel is involved. Weights and balances along with heat and altitude are very challenging and in fact even the weight of Darren was needed prior to launch to determine fuel levels or if they would refuel in transport."
I've been racing for 25 years and I just learned here that a helicopter needs my weight to launch? How the hell is that not required on the entry form?
 
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