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Keep me grounded!!! Grounds...

shrive81

Well-Known Member
Ok so lets talk grounds... so with buggies and most trucks being hard mounted to the chassis and no rubber soft mounts like a normal car are you still running ground wires to your trans and motor or is this not needed since they are already grounded via fabricated metal mounts..

Second:

when building a wire loom in the vehicle to for accessories and components I try to have bring all my grounds to a central location. For example I will bring all the grounds for any fans pumps etc in the engine bay (buggy) to a central ground stud usually welded to the chassis then all the grounds in the interior or the vehicle to a central location and same for the front of the vehicle or back if it is a truck. I then makes sure that the wire loom has a large gauge like 10g negative wire in it to connet all these point back to the main ground point for the battery. This way I insure that every component has a poper ground. From all the experts out there is this a common practice or am I just wasting time...

Third:
Thanks you guys rock
 

green787

Well-Known Member
Ok so lets talk grounds... so with buggies and most trucks being hard mounted to the chassis and no rubber soft mounts like a normal car are you still running ground wires to your trans and motor or is this not needed since they are already grounded via fabricated metal mounts..

Second:

when building a wire loom in the vehicle to for accessories and components I try to have bring all my grounds to a central location. For example I will bring all the grounds for any fans pumps etc in the engine bay (buggy) to a central ground stud usually welded to the chassis then all the grounds in the interior or the vehicle to a central location and same for the front of the vehicle or back if it is a truck. I then makes sure that the wire loom has a large gauge like 10g negative wire in it to connet all these point back to the main ground point for the battery. This way I insure that every component has a poper ground. From all the experts out there is this a common practice or am I just wasting time...

Third:
Thanks you guys rock
With a common star point ground like you described, at least you know where to look if ground is an issue....
 

Kyle D

Well-Known Member
My own experience is that extra grounds never hurt anything. Not having enough can wreak havoc with all sorts of electronic components that may not even be related to where the ground problem is. I work on heavy equipment for a living and I would guess that more than half of the electrical problems found happen to be related to a weak or bad ground. Long story short I would add all those ground wires that you feel are unnecessary. They won't hurt a thing.
 

dzrt performance

Well-Known Member
Best practice is to run a ground wire to each device and bring them all to a central location. I do not use the chassis AT ALL, run everything to an isolated stud, and a heavy gauge wire to battery negative from the same stud.
 
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