led vs. hid lights

gil_caz

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has anyone compared the LED lights from visionxoffroad, to H.I.D. lights comparable to the baja designs?

how do these perform in the dust?

how sturdy are the mounts?

durable?

thanks in advance for the answers.

if not, what would you recommend



 

ultrablew

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We bought 2 Sol-Tek HID's before our last race and mounted them to the front bumper of the truck. With a full light bar up top, we ran with just the 2 HID's on 99% of the race. They cut through the dust perfect and worked awesome. Couldn't be happier with them.
 

Wendell #527

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We bought 2 Sol-Tek HID's before our last race and mounted them to the front bumper of the truck. With a full light bar up top, we ran with just the 2 HID's on 99% of the race. They cut through the dust perfect and worked awesome. Couldn't be happier with them.
x2. I'm running 4 Sol Tek 4" HIDs and two 6" HIDs on top. The LEDs I see aren't nearly as bright. I usually don't need to run all the lights at the same time, either. Plenty of light. I can't outrun my light no matter how hard I push it.
 

Sparky

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Look at the LED stuff from Rigid Industries. IMHO they have much better output and optics than the VisionX. And watch their videos of abusing and shooting their lights. Their stuff is tough!! A couple teams have ditched their HID and gone totally LED with Rigid lights.
 

lovesdunes

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I have taken all kinds of pictures of the Rigid vs Vision vs HIDs.

Here is the Vision X 42" Lightbar...





Here is the Rigid 40" Lightbar as it is typically shipped...





Since the reflectors can be reconfigured to whatever you might need, here is a shot with more flood reflectors installed...





Here is a shot with 4, 4' Baja Designs Fuegos. 2 Driving Spot and 2 Driving Flood...




Here is a shot with the Rigid light with 2 of the 4" Driving Flood HIDs...

 

07FJRog

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the Rigid Ind. 40 sure holds it's own.

thanks for the pics.

I have a 6" amber coming from them for the front of my buggy, I will try to get pics when I get it mounted up and show the pattern.
 

mcheck

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what would work better in say fog? the amber or the clear?
 

lovesdunes

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Amber is for dusty / foggy conditions. Amber does not reflect nearly as much light back in your face as white does.
 

RelativeEng

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what would work better in say fog? the amber or the clear?
An "Amber" light will always reflect back less light than a white light. It is the short wavelength of blue light that causes the reflection, which is not prevalent in any yellow/amber/orange/red light. The very reason it appears reddish is because it does not have significant quantities of short wavelength light. This is a pretty big shortcoming in white LED lighting due to the fact that the light actually being created is blue and is mixed with yellow radiated from the phosphor layer. The majority of the light will be scattered over significant distances.
 

SpeedBump

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Amber is for dusty / foggy conditions. Amber does not reflect nearly as much light back in your face as white does.
In my experience in dusty conditions, the color of the light (amber or white) has very little practical differences. Light placement makes a much bigger difference. In dusty conditions during a desert race such as when you approach another racer, the roof lights and bumper lights reflect too much light back to the driver. A diffuse light mounted very low (4” above the bottom of the skip plate or less) with most light going down toward the track minimizes the stray light being reflected back toward the driver.

We wire the roof bar and the dust bars are on the same On/On switch mounted to the gear shift lever. When we come up on a competitors dust the driver switches the roof bar off and the dust bars on with the single switch.

This setup has proven to be a competitive advantage. At a recent night race we started 34th in class and passed 26 competitors within the first 50 miles in what one competitors said was the “Worst dust I have had to deal with so far”.

Before we started using LED dust lights, the conventional lights mounted low were always broken before we finished the race. LED light can take a beating.
 

Jack

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Isn't it bad and take some time for HIDs to come back on?
 

SpeedBump

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Isn't it bad and take some time for HIDs to come back on?
We have switched both HID and LED. The LED switch on faster than the HID.

I do not know if cycling the HID on and off is damaging. Certianly, cycling the LED is not a problem.
 

jeff

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I ran 3 Soltek lights on my daily driver for a while and used them on the pavement more than I did off-road. I must have turned them on and off a thousand times (oncoming traffic) and they worked just fine. Once they had warmed up they would turn off and return to full brightness very quickly. It might not be good for them but in my case it worked just fine.

Aloha
 

RelativeEng

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We have switched both HID and LED. The LED switch on faster than the HID.

I do not know if cycling the HID on and off is damaging. Certianly, cycling the LED is not a problem.
Switching HIDs on and off does not do anything to them as long as they have a high-quality ballast (one with an extended time delay and correct algorithms). The reason they take so long to "warm up" is because the bulb must reach a nominal pressure for the arc to effectively create a radiating plasma. This takes a while because the gases inside the bulb are of a low density and therefore the thermal conductivity of the molecules is very low. This is also why they require more power to create the initial arc and maintain it until the heat raises to a point that the pressure reaches nominal. However, If you have a cheap ballast, it could reset into startup mode while the pressure is still high. If this happens, the voltage through the bulb will be too high and will cause an extreme pressure and heat that could crack the quartz globe. Any lights from Soltek, Hella, KC and Vision-X will be fine.
 

SpeedBump

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An "Amber" light will always reflect back less light than a white light. It is the short wavelength of blue light that causes the reflection, which is not prevalent in any yellow/amber/orange/red light. The very reason it appears reddish is because it does not have significant quantities of short wavelength light.
Using Google search I have not been able to confirm that amber light reflects back less light from fog or dust. I found that the advantage of “selective yellow” is in the way our eyes process light.

[ame]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selective_yellow[/ame]


http://www.danielsternlighting.com/images/S-Yellow.pdf

According to Daniel Stern Lighting:

“Selective yellow light can improve a driver's ability to see in fog or rain or snow, but not because it 'penetrates fog better' or 'reflects less off or snow, but not because it 'penetrates fog better' or 'reflects less off droplets' as is commonly thought. That effect is known as Rayleigh Scattering, and is why the sky appears blue. However, it occurs only when the droplet size is equal or smaller than the wavelength of the light, which is certainly not the case with ordinary fog, rain or snow. Roadway Fog droplets are several orders of magnitude larger than visible light wavelengths, so there's no Rayleigh Scattering.

So, why do yellow fog lamps seem to work better? It's because of the way the human eye interacts with different colors of light. Blue and violet are very difficult for the human optical system to process correctly. They are the shortest visible wavelengths and tend to focus in front of our eyes' retinae, rather than upon it. To demonstrate this to yourself, find a dark blue store front sign or something else that's a dark, pure blue against a dark background in the absence of white light—from any appreciable distance, it's almost impossible for your eyes to see the blue lighted object as a sharply defined form;the edges blur significantly. Deep blue runway lights exhibit the same effect; check it out the next time you land at night.”
 

ocotilo

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after all the lights i have tried and gone through, the best lights on the market are phantom lights, they even come with a lifetime warranty, phantom lights are a few hundred dollars cheaper and they are bullet proof, literally!
they are the brightest led lights out there
 

lovesdunes

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after all the lights i have tried and gone through, the best lights on the market are phantom lights, they even come with a lifetime warranty, phantom lights are a few hundred dollars cheaper and they are bullet proof, literally!
they are the brightest led lights out there
That's some funny stuff right there. The Phantom lights arn't even as bright as the Vision X lights that arn't as bright as the Rigid lights.








Throw a bunch of Flood reflectors into the Rigid light and put two 4" HID Spots and the light is really impressive.




The Phantom light is bright but no where nearly as bright and the Rigid light. Last time I checked it was pretty easy the find the Rigid light for right around the same price as well.
 
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