Lordstown Motors Electric Truck Racing San Felipe 250

Jim Glickenhaus

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Copying this from Lordstown's official response for those that might night have seen it.


As an innovation driven company committed to building the first and best full-size EV pickup truck, pushing the envelope of what is possible is core to our DNA. The SCORE San Felipe 250 provided just that type of opportunity and we are incredibly proud to have entered and competed, and for the validating feedback we obtained on so many aspects of the vehicle.


We knew this was a grueling environment and would push us. We successfully navigated the extreme conditions over the first 40-mile leg of the race with all of our mechanicals meeting or exceeding our expectations. While we anticipated significantly higher energy demand from this environment – the reality of the terrain proved to be even more demanding.


During the race, when we reached the first charging stop, we analyzed the drive data, and concluded our energy usage was much more intensive than we had modeled. In our pre-race estimates, we assumed a 3X energy usage compared to normal road conditions at 200 ft. elevation. Following stage 1, however, our data showed consumption at 4 times the normal level. As we recharged for stage 2, we concluded that the next leg – more than 65 miles at net 1750 ft. elevation – could result in our vehicle stopping in the middle of mountainous terrain with no viable or accessible charging options, so we decided not to send the vehicle back out on the course. While we were done racing for the day, we continued to demonstrate the vehicle’s capabilities through an additional 10 miles of off-course driving, which only added to the insights and feedback we generated during the race.


Overall, we were very pleased with the vehicle’s performance and we generated extensive feedback that we will continue to assess in the weeks ahead, including:


-Our components can stand up to the harshest environment and G forces
-Our in-wheel hub motors performed great and demonstrated superior traction
-Our drivetrain and battery pack took the beatings dished out by the grueling conditions and stood up to the test
-Our frame stood up to the conditions without any issues
-Our thermal management system kept all components cool despite the vehicle pulling much more energy than anticipated
-Driving in deep sand, with the required larger tires, required more energy than we forecasted
-Our truck completed the stage fully intact, operationally sound and is now headed back home


We tip our cap to Baja and the tough terrain and we look forward to next year. We expected to be pushed to the limit and we were not disappointed. We will continue to push our vehicle and our team to the limits because that is what it takes to successfully develop the level of market-changing innovation to which we are committed.

They could have delivered free grocery’s around the Navajo nation covered more dirt miles and actually did something worthwhile to talk about. Lordstown has like 2 huge class actions from investors , three other big lawsuits about stolen infotainment systems, stolen intellectual property with the batteries, the hub motors are owned and licensed by a company out of Ljubljana Slovenia . You do not have to research Steve Burns too deep to see he is a shady businessman .
I'm sure the SEC will be looking over the statement E-Motorsports quoted.
 

jon coleman

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Copying this from Lordstown's official response for those that might night have seen it.


As an innovation driven company committed to building the first and best full-size EV pickup truck, pushing the envelope of what is possible is core to our DNA. The SCORE San Felipe 250 provided just that type of opportunity and we are incredibly proud to have entered and competed, and for the validating feedback we obtained on so many aspects of the vehicle.


We knew this was a grueling environment and would push us. We successfully navigated the extreme conditions over the first 40-mile leg of the race with all of our mechanicals meeting or exceeding our expectations. While we anticipated significantly higher energy demand from this environment – the reality of the terrain proved to be even more demanding.


During the race, when we reached the first charging stop, we analyzed the drive data, and concluded our energy usage was much more intensive than we had modeled. In our pre-race estimates, we assumed a 3X energy usage compared to normal road conditions at 200 ft. elevation. Following stage 1, however, our data showed consumption at 4 times the normal level. As we recharged for stage 2, we concluded that the next leg – more than 65 miles at net 1750 ft. elevation – could result in our vehicle stopping in the middle of mountainous terrain with no viable or accessible charging options, so we decided not to send the vehicle back out on the course. While we were done racing for the day, we continued to demonstrate the vehicle’s capabilities through an additional 10 miles of off-course driving, which only added to the insights and feedback we generated during the race.


Overall, we were very pleased with the vehicle’s performance and we generated extensive feedback that we will continue to assess in the weeks ahead, including:


-Our components can stand up to the harshest environment and G forces
-Our in-wheel hub motors performed great and demonstrated superior traction
-Our drivetrain and battery pack took the beatings dished out by the grueling conditions and stood up to the test
-Our frame stood up to the conditions without any issues
-Our thermal management system kept all components cool despite the vehicle pulling much more energy than anticipated
-Driving in deep sand, with the required larger tires, required more energy than we forecasted
-Our truck completed the stage fully intact, operationally sound and is now headed back home


We tip our cap to Baja and the tough terrain and we look forward to next year. We expected to be pushed to the limit and we were not disappointed. We will continue to push our vehicle and our team to the limits because that is what it takes to successfully develop the level of market-changing innovation to which we are committed.
yup, when i started racing , i gassed up my fuel cell and assumed my xj jeep would get 25 highway 18 city, so i figured 15 mpg, dog gonnit, it was 5 mpg,, hmmmmm, shoulda at least tested , YOU THINK???
 

RobinsonMS

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I just made the assumption that they wanted to put some more miles in for testing purposes. Based on nothing but Fish stating they were headed west. Nothing to get excited about
 

ciscokid8

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im waiting to see the headlines read: LORDSTOWN MOTORS PLACES (technically) 2ND IN GRUELLING DESERT RACE lol
 

Dave Cole 4454

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I will find Kyles IG video recap. Bottom line, we started popping fuses around 137. Got to 156 but the way we had it configured it was a 90 minute fix for each fuse. With some very basic changes we can make it a 30 second fix and likely eliminate the problem. At the half way mark, we had enough pace to finish an hour ahead of cutoff. We will back this year. Maybe the 500. Definitely the Mint. Fear and Charging in Las Vegas :)
 

Wicked Al

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The Tesla model S motor weighs in at 70lbs. Stuffing that much mass behind a hub, then designing it to survive a race seems unlikely.
And yet, two hours of racing it survived, how much more, the future will tell us.

I remember a 200hp electric motor powering a rock crusher at a gravel pit back in my youth. The motor was massive, it seemed laughable to imagine a 200hp motor in a car...yet here we are.

The choice of hub or chassis mount really comes down to what attributes you value, not if it is doable. If you want more utility in the vehicle, you move the drivetrain out to the hub. If you want to reduce the weight and number of components, you move it out to the hub. If you want to reduce impacts to the drivetrain, you move it to the chassis, if you want to reduce the unsprung to sprung ratio, you move it to the chassis. One gives you less points of failure, but a harsher environment...it's a choice, not a matter if it is possible.
 

Tom_Willis

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The electric car industry should be required to disclose their sources of power as well as where the batteries come from. Cigarette companies have to print a disclosure that their products kill, and car manufacturers have to indicate what percent of the vehicle is produced overseas. Shouldn't ev manufacturers disclose how much "evil coal" will be burned to charge them per year? Or if the lithium was mined by 9 year old Chinese?
 

jon coleman

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(i got my liberal hat on)' the power for my tesla comes from the plug in my garage, its sooo kleeeen( if you Dont see the dirty naughty coal plant, it Doesn't exist right??, 👍👍👍( ev car debate brings out the purple in people
 
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Tube ride

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1969 Baja mil. First “clean” promotion/ publicity stunt. Stroppe built propane motor home! Finished the miles in 90+ hours .
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Total Loss

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The electric car industry should be required to disclose their sources of power as well as where the batteries come from. Cigarette companies have to print a disclosure that their products kill, and car manufacturers have to indicate what percent of the vehicle is produced overseas. Shouldn't ev manufacturers disclose how much "evil coal" will be burned to charge them per year? Or if the lithium was mined by 9 year old Chinese?
Imagine if Musk had to put a disclaimer on his cars...this car might be dangerous to your health...spontaneous combustion is possible.
Made with Blood Lithium...
Lol.
 
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