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Motion Sickness at V2R

johndjmix

Well-Known Member
Last year at V2R, i wound up losing my lunch around pit 6 and having to swap out of the truck. This year i was careful what I ate, but still got feeling weird after that "Roller Coaster" section with the tall hills and drops, and had to get out of the drivers seat after.

We still pulled off 2nd place (Trophylite) thanks to Gary Hull!

After talking to a few teams at the Reno Hotel, i found out im not the only one with this issue. On top of that I hear a lot of racers only have this problem at V2R. I personally have never had that issue at any other race, just at V2R.

The great guys/girls from the PRP team told me the trick was to take dramamene ginger before the race on V2R.....going to try this.

Who else has this issue?

--John
 

J Prich

Well-Known Member
Last year at V2R, i wound up losing my lunch around pit 6 and having to swap out of the truck. This year i was careful what I ate, but still got feeling weird after that "Roller Coaster" section with the tall hills and drops, and had to get out of the drivers seat after.

We still pulled off 2nd place (Trophylite) thanks to Gary Hull!

After talking to a few teams at the Reno Hotel, i found out im not the only one with this issue. On top of that I hear a lot of racers only have this problem at V2R. I personally have never had that issue at any other race, just at V2R.

The great guys/girls from the PRP team told me the trick was to take dramamene ginger before the race on V2R.....going to try this.

Who else has this issue?

--John
Bromine is good too. Happens to me personally in the passenger seat, but not usually in the left seat. But probably not that uncommon I'd guess.
 

MTPyle

Well-Known Member
My co driver got sick after he changed a tire. He was pretty gassed after that and had a hard time recovering. He was checked out for about 25-30 min.

I think it’s as much the heat as anything. And it only takes one weird move to get you out of wack. Could be just looking down at the wrong time or turning your head.

When flying if I move while under load it can really mess me up. For instance if I am climbing and lean down to pick up a dropped pen I get spatially disorientated. While in stable cruise if I lean down to get the dropped pen it has no effect. So when your physicallly changing direction and move to do something you can get out of wack. Could be as simple as that.

Congrats on your 2nd. That’s a huge accomplishment in V2R


Mike
 

43mod

Well-Known Member
Johnny Johnny :) you forgot to tell them about you being a strange dude with ever evolving habits and sleep/eat (or no sleep/eat) patterns. Lots of fun to hang with for sure but pretty hard to troubleshoot . I also forgot to give you mad props for being the 2nd TL truck but also running the old narrow version suspension !
 

johndjmix

Well-Known Member
We will be keeping it narrow! Helpsin the rutts like you said russ!

Wasn't the heat for me, happened at night... Ill give the suggestions a try!

TrophyLite 6013
Wild Power Sports
 
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Christian Sourapas

Well-Known Member
I get really bad motion sickness, believe it or not. I have definitely thrown up in a couple of races, and many on the verge. What makes Vegas to Reno a special case is it's usually hot as balls, there is change of elevation throughout the race, and the twisty, windy, "roller coaster" roads all contribute to a feeling of unease.

There are two effective remedies, at least in my experiences. It's either the Scopolamine patch or the Bonine pills. The "wristband", ginger pills, and potassium are all BS. The patch is effective (never puked wearing one), but the side effects are terrible (blurry vision 25 miles in, EXTREMELY dry throat to where it hurts to swallow, and fatigue). I opted to go with the Bonine pills and have had great luck with it. Get similar side effects, but not nearly as severe.

And Pro tip: Once you start feeling woozy, lift open your shield slightly, you'll thank me later.
 

Dirty Harry

Well-Known Member
The first time I navigated I puked all over the place, which gave me a healthy respect for getting motion sick. I try to be well hydrated before the race and get as good of a night sleep as possible. Dramamine just puts me to sleep personally. I use the Scopolamine patch the night before the race, and take Bonine and eat a banana on race day.
 

geno760

Well-Known Member
Last year at V2R, i wound up losing my lunch around pit 6 and having to swap out of the truck. This year i was careful what I ate, but still got feeling weird after that "Roller Coaster" section with the tall hills and drops, and had to get out of the drivers seat after.

We still pulled off 2nd place (Trophylite) thanks to Gary Hull!

After talking to a few teams at the Reno Hotel, i found out im not the only one with this issue. On top of that I hear a lot of racers only have this problem at V2R. I personally have never had that issue at any other race, just at V2R.

The great guys/girls from the PRP team told me the trick was to take dramamene ginger before the race on V2R.....going to try this.

Who else has this issue?

--John
Last year, Josh found out about some of that by Pit 1! lol
 

geno760

Well-Known Member
I get really bad motion sickness, believe it or not. I have definitely thrown up in a couple of races, and many on the verge. What makes Vegas to Reno a special case is it's usually hot as balls, there is change of elevation throughout the race, and the twisty, windy, "roller coaster" roads all contribute to a feeling of unease.

There are two effective remedies, at least in my experiences. It's either the Scopolamine patch or the Bonine pills. The "wristband", ginger pills, and potassium are all BS. The patch is effective (never puked wearing one), but the side effects are terrible (blurry vision 25 miles in, EXTREMELY dry throat to where it hurts to swallow, and fatigue). I opted to go with the Bonine pills and have had great luck with it. Get similar side effects, but not nearly as severe.

And Pro tip: Once you start feeling woozy, lift open your shield slightly, you'll thank me later.
Great advice! Thanks Christian!!
 

cjohnson

Well-Known Member
I only get motion sickness occasionally. I think its triggered by a combination of the things mentioned already. Heat, dehydration, over exertion and thinner air from altitude. Altitude changes can also mess with your inner ear. Sometimes it's easy to neglect yourself so if I've been out thrashing in the sun the day or two before a race I'll take a half a dramamine tablet before the race. For me it's enough to keep the motion sickness away but it doesn't make me drowsy.
 

michael_loomis

Well-Known Member
For me it’s looking down at the nav so much... even trippier with these newer higher refresh rate screens.

I usually take the non drowsy Dramamine (ginger based) and they work great for me. I forgot to take them for V2R and was pretty woozy most of my stint.
 

EMS702

Rescue 1
I have to think from a medical standpoint it is like CJ said. All of those things mixed with change in altitude and thinner air. In some parts of the race especially as you go north and in a faster vehicle the altitude change can be faster than say if you were in a car on the highway.
 

y2kbaja

Well-Known Member
When I was doing rally nav I wore the patch prescribed by my dr. While I didn't get sick the blurred vision and dry throat like Christian said are for sure a bad thing.
Any drug just puts me to sleep or doesn't have any affect.
It was suggested to me and has WORKED and easy to do. Wear an ear plug in 1 ear. It throws your equilibrium off with no other side affects that I've experienced. I get motion sickness while driving and keep a box in the center console of my prerunner and pop one in as needed. Usually needs to be done before it gets past the point of no return (tossing the cookies).
When prerunning with my wife we sometimes both get motion sickness. We found it was usually after lunch with a soda. We cut the soda and sugars from our prerun diet and stick to proteins (nuts, jerky) and plenty of water, works like a champ.
 

AZFR8TRAIN

Well-Known Member
They had Dramamine on the titanic. Ha yes it has been around for ever and it will make you drowsy I say stay away from it. I used Bonnie on a scuba trip. Rough water in small boat it kinda worked still felt it. But diesel fumes also rolled back onto boat. For my self. And I get motion sick VERY easy. Can’t read in a car. I use ginger pills. Get at health food store. Saw an episode of myth busters they used astronaut test machine to get them. Puking all over but the ginger pills worked best. I’m just saying it’s not as much chemicals in your body and it for sure works for me. I start taking day or two before activity to get in system so far Works great
 

cjohnson

Well-Known Member
Dramamine has different effects on individuals. Some people get drowsy, some get wired. No matter what a person takes they should try it a couple times beforehand so they know what their reaction will be. Especially if they are going to be in the driver seat.
 

Rlovell

Member
Lots of different information here, and I'd expect everyone reacts differently to different methods. At V2R in the co-driver seat (6100) I felt a bit off at one point. I had the orientation set wrong on the big GPS and it was jumping around and rotating in circles. Very difficult to nav with so I spent more time, head down on GPS than head up than I normally do. For me, a crack of the visor, drink of water and push myself harder to focus cleared it up. Fixed the GPS and the first pit and took on a water.

Several years ago I made the switch to ear buds in hopes it would help me hear better. It worked, but several hours in the B1K my co driver asked me "what the hell is wrong with you!?" While I didn't realize until a heated conversation I realized the ear buds threw off my equilibrium and I was getting motion sickness and driving like crap. Pulled the buds out and I was fine. My brother loves the ear buds but they are no go for me.

I'd second staying hydrated, before and during the race. I pee ALOT in the truck. Under the stress of a race it's very easy to miss signs of heat exhaustion and dehydration.
 
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