"Motorsports" Wire Color Coding

Co-Dog

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Here's a post-shrink example of my ghetto labeling. All you need is a 99 cent fine point Sharpie.

That's better than the labeler. You can make the labels any length necessary. Good penmanship is a must.:D
 

DesertGuy1

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One concern regarding a Sharpie is how well it withstands fluids, grease and dirt. I have noticed that a Sharpie will quickly fade in the sunlight... Have used the "write-on" labels in the past with the clear wrap-over. They look good initially but turn yellow and opaque from the sun making the label unreadable.
 

F.A.S.T.clothing

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is their a good kit or parts list to order to prepare for doing a full race wire... we went through and removed all the useless stuff out of our stock harness, but besides having to rewire that have to wire all our new things in (3 coolers, pumps, pumpers, lights, radios, intercom, gps, gauges, and the list goes on)

My dad is going to do most of the work and he is very picky about clean looking and done correctly wiring. I am sure he wil tell me things i need to get as we are going. However if you can refer me where to order for best price and what to order ahead of time it will help with our short time limit. For instance what wire spec and size and the same with breakers, what kind of switches or idiot lights to use or stay away from. If their are good starter kits or if I need to buy everything individually.

I also just want to say, I use to only go on DR but the last 4 days I have gone in every shop section on here and look at all post that related to my project up to the 15th page in each section. The knowledge in here is so much better and no bickering and drama and trash talking. I have learmed so much on what products to use or not use and motor upgrades. I am going to frequent this site daily and after a year of racing will return the favor with the knowledge I gain. On a fabrication sidepoint my dad brother and I have been designing a lot of cool unique things on our truck, which we had to rebuild cause previous shop (who was a professional baricator at least said he was) screwed uo.

Anyways next month we will be plumbing fuel and coolers and doing electrical in order to get truck ready for BAP in mid february I want to thank anyone who helps us out now.
 

Pauly 303

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Buy all your switches triple sealed, the one's from Mckenzies that they have been selling for ever. When it comes to dummy lights, the bigger the better. And since your at Mckenzies ask "Bird" what needs a relay, he might be helpful if he's in good mood! Then go down the street to Orvac and buy all the wire and terminals you need. Pretty much anything labled Noble is good and you can also find it at most electronic stores and Macfadden Dale Harware. I have the best luck soldiering Noble terminals. And here's an interesting bit of info I just learned recently. Since you asked what size wire to use were. Home Depot has a pretty good auto primary wire that on the back of the package says what that particular gauge wire is good for, whether it be brake lights, gauge cluster or dome light. Good luck and have fun!
 

philofab

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Trailers use white for ground due to following UL standards.

Most aftermarket wiring stuff I've ever seen use GM color coding as a basis. I tend to loosely follow the GM stuff when wiring accessories or whole cars.
 

78crew

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I think I have seen small machines that actually print on the wire every few feet. I personally like to use a label maker & some clear, heat shrink over it, the kind with the glued inside, they seem to hold up, but what I notice is that having a label at each end is helpful but only if you are dealing with the end of the wire. Scenario: you are in BFE, & some unforseen situation damages a bundle of wires in an unlabeled area. Now what...

Just a thaught...
 

Co-Dog

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I think I have seen small machines that actually print on the wire every few feet. I personally like to use a label maker & some clear, heat shrink over it, the kind with the glued inside, they seem to hold up, but what I notice is that having a label at each end is helpful but only if you are dealing with the end of the wire. Scenario: you are in BFE, & some unforseen situation damages a bundle of wires in an unlabeled area. Now what...

Just a thaught...
Oh those, "What if . . .?" thoughts.:confused:

I've seen it happen 3 times. Two of those were such a mess and scorched that there just wasn't anything left to work with. The harness' became one multicolored cable. Both of those linked to undersized wire and/or incorrect circuit protection.

The third was pretty simple. Eliminated the obvious by matching wire size/color (this particular harness had at least 4 different sizes of wire). Then used an ohmmeter to identify the remainder. The wires were labeled at each end which definitely helped, because I only spent time testing wires with a matching label on the other end.

Keep this in mind when wiring: The first two would not have occurred if wired correctly. The third was from damage to the vehicle, and the harness was routed in a location that was vulnerable. Overall, I would consider this scenario rare and mostly avoidable.

That's what I've experienced on the subject.
 

WannaBendItLV

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A company called Allen-Bradley aka Rockwell makes a sick lil machine that prints your custom labels in black ink on little plastic snap-offs. You stuff the lil tab in a small plastic holder then squeeze over the wire then shrink then term. Ive had tons of time troubleshooting large control cabs from deep shaft/mining automated man hoists to water treatment plants to pump stations etc etc etc. and i gotta say that the permanent and legible marking on each end has always been the biggest help when hunting down gremlins in wiring, ahhh scratch that.... A GOOD DRAWING of your system comes first, then the labels in close second. The drawing is the yellow brick road thru your system. Also, having all the labels correspond EXACTLY to the drawing helps too. Typos can be a pain!

Color coding can help in some cases. The largest and by far most confusing system I have ever had to deal with had all wiring coded by voltage, on a car that makes no sense. If I was going to wire a car I think coloring would be real nice to have, only my personal opinion though. Maybe like all cooling is blue, signals purple, lights yellow and so on. You could even bust out striped or whatever, I would use the simplest way that seems to make the best sense to you.

Now as far as being able to ID wiring in the middle of damaged loom while out in BFE....

It's the coolest wiring technique I have ever seen, was on a machine from Germany. About 40 miles of wiring jammed onto a tractor about 40 feet long. Every inch of wiring passes thru the labeler before being installed and gets printed with some sort of tough **
¡Ay, caramba!****
¡Ay, caramba!****
¡Ay, caramba!****
¡Ay, caramba!****
¡Ay, caramba!** super ink, they used a labeling system where if one end was called ATC-01 and the other was ATC-02, thats what was on the wire itself, ATC-01/ATC-02.... every 3 inches! It came in big help when the hydraulics crushed the loom way out on one of the drill booms. Its the only technique I have ever seen that can actually keep your Fluke in the bag.

just my opinion though, grain of salt an all that stuff. BTW.... awesome buggy you are building DG1. Update please!!!!
 
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