noob looking for insight Baja 1000

Hi All -

So noob here looking for insight. I an turning 50 next year thought it would be interesting to ride the 1000, done lots of MX, Desert MC racing, long distance endurance and Rally stuff.

My concern is / are the Trophy Trucks, we will probably ride this as a 2 man team, and are pretty sure we will be caught by the fast trucks. I am pretty sure we will have no issue finishing as long as the bike hold up.

Does anyone have any insight on not getting run over ? Am I worrying about nothing ? Just never raced in a Race with such a diverse set of vehicles and competitors.

Thanks in advance for the insight.

GO
 

BajaboundMoto

Well-Known Member
Maybe a better post for the "bikes" section.

IMO, you don't need to worry about trucks/buggies passing as long as you're smart about it....
1st goal is to reach sunset before getting caught, then it becomes much easier and less stressful for you and for the driver doing the passing.
Be aware timing wise when you're going to start getting caught.
Anytime you're caught pull off the course, way off the course, like 30+' off, before the car ever is in your dust. Don't re-enter the course until all the dust has cleared and you can see there's nothing coming.
And when you're caught (daytime a big deal) by the 1st truck pretty much figure your next hour+ is totally shot, it's not a race for you at that point, you'll be off the course more than on because there will be MANY battles happening bumper to bumper and you do not want to be in the middle of that.
 

rustyb

Well-Known Member
What Tim said...

Practice looking behind you while riding. Once every 15 seconds for daytime, 30 seconds for night. Seriously, practice, and stretch if necessary. I'm 58 and not as limber as I used to be, can be difficult.
 

Stuck Sucks

Well-Known Member
We have a friend who raced a bike in the 2012 B1000 - a peninsula run. She went like 8 hours until the first TT caught up with her - at that point, she was also very tired. She found a nice bush and curled up for a couple-hour nap. After that, she was rested and most the fast traffic had passed by her. She ironmanned a finish in La Paz. Another interesting strategy.
 

DeRaRa

Well-Known Member
As someone who has driven trucks in the 1000 and caught bikes and quads and have always wanted to race a quad seeing for myself how dangerous it is for the riders the only advice I would give you is always be aware of the race around you.
 

Bro_Gill

Well-Known Member
The nap advice is spot on. Since you are riding for a finish instead of racing for a win, the safety nap when you get caught by the super fast stuff is wise. It also moves you back into the slower, smaller classes of cars. Remember, being really tired while driving/riding is like being drunk when it comes to mental responses. Don't be a statistic after the race!
 

JDDurfey

Well-Known Member
I have raced the 1000 and been caught by the cars and trucks. It isn't that bad if you have a place to pull off the course. When it is bad is south of Loreto in the thick brush where there are just two silty tracks and no where to get away from the trucks. Getting caught at night is the best scenario. The lights coming up behind you let you know they are coming and you can find a place to pull over. Don't stop on the outside of a corner, go to the inside if you have to stop on a corner. Duck your head, because there may be some large rocks flying your way!

What Tim, BajaBoundMoto, said is spot on. Do not under any circumstances jump back on the race course if you cannot see. The cars and trucks will drive blindly through the dust using their GPS, and you will get run over and killed. The new tracker, Stella, may help with that, but I would not put my life in its hands. I would push as hard as you can until you get caught, then ride with eyes in the back of your head.
 
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BANNED4LIFE

Well-Known Member
GREAT info by all of these guys.....remember the term, "with age comes cage"....bajaracingadventures.com....and go watch "driving dirty, the road to the baja 1000"...its on redbulltv.....good info there as well as inspiration to DO IT!!!
 

JayQC

Well-Known Member
We have a friend who raced a bike in the 2012 B1000 - a peninsula run. She went like 8 hours until the first TT caught up with her - at that point, she was also very tired. She found a nice bush and curled up for a couple-hour nap. After that, she was rested and most the fast traffic had passed by her. She ironmanned a finish in La Paz. Another interesting strategy.
God damn I love desert racing
 

MasTacos

Well-Known Member
Tim is spot on and, if you want to run a moto, I would recommend you talk to Tim in more detail.

You can also always pull into pretty much any pit and stay there for a couple of hours. The crews will take care of you (if they don't, share the story here and I'm sure they'll hear about it).

I've had plenty of people pull in at Mag7 pits I've run who just need a moment to get out of the dust and out of the way for an hour or two.
 

green787

Well-Known Member
Has anyone racing moto ever been run down by a TT??? Not likely... If you hear a strange sound in your helmet, it's probably someone's horn blaring.....
 

Josh 8

Well-Known Member
Has anyone racing moto ever been run down by a TT??? Not likely... If you hear a strange sound in your helmet, it's probably someone's horn blaring.....
I know of one. David Bills at the SF 250 in about 2003. I cant remember who ran him over. But I do know Dan Smith the driver of the Enduro TT was the next driver through and stopped for the guy in the middle of course but there was nothing he could do but drag him out of the way.

I am sure a few more have happened.

I found the story online...

MARCH 15, 2003 -- 1620 Hours -- The 267X Sportsman Motorcycle team led by Angel Montiel of San Diego, California and the entire off-road racing community suffered a devastating blow during the SCORE Desert Series San Felipe 250 this morning.

With information provided to ORC staffers from multiple sources, some of who were on-scene and team members of the 267X team, the Off-Road.com staff is sad to report the death of David Bills, 33 years-old, of San Diego, California.

The motorcycle racer had just completed a rider change race mile 48. He took the motorcycle from Montiel, who had suffered his own crash at race mile three and was slow in getting to the pit exchange location. It wasn't long before the Trophy Trucks were speeding towards him. As he left the exchange location, team members reported two trophy trucks that passed at "blazing speed" near racemile 48. Team members at the pit location reported the first truck through racemile 48 was the #52 Trophy Truck of Juan Carlos Ibarra quickly followed by the #99 Riviera Trophy Truck of Nick Baldwin.

According to ORC sources, the accident occurred in a narrow section of the racecourse and radio reports were that the #99 Riviera Trophy Truck "clipped" the race bike driven by David Bills. Bob Steinberger, also known as "The Weatherman," broadcasted a "Code Red" as he received word of the accident on the frequency. Emergency operations and rescue were immediately dispatched to the location, however, any hope was short lived as it was reported only a few minutes later that the motorcycle racer was deceased.

Jesse Jones, driver of the PCI Race Radios #7 Trophy Truck, reported to ORC staffers that as he passed the downed motorcycle racer, he saw that the racer was only a few feet off the race course and was being attended to by another racer reportedly to be the #8 Trophy Truck of Dan Smith and Enduro Racing. Jesse Jones reported the racecourse at that area as being very narrow and heading into a blind sweeping turn.

The driver, David Bills, 33 years old, resided in San Diego, California. He was a night manager for the Ralph's grocery store chain in San Diego County. He moved to San Diego from Utah 13 years ago and was not married. This was his first race in Baja and was part of the team of sportsman riders formed and led by Angel Montiel.

ORC staffers were aware of the tragic incident as "The Weatherman" put the frequency on Code Red. It was later discovered that David Bills and Angel Montiel had shared the quiet ORC campfire the evening before the race. ORC staffers remember David Bills as enjoying the campfire with the small group of friends as most of the crowd turned in early for the 5:00 a.m. wake up call in the ORC camp.

After meeting with SCORE-International Director Sal Fish and his team of race staff, Team 267x left immediately for the United States. It has been reported that the Riviera Trophy Truck discontinued the race after the accident. The incident is under investigation.

The entire Off-Road.com staff sends our condolences to the friends and family of David Bills and Team 267x. Off-Road.com will be organizing support in the form of financial donations for the family and friends of David Bills and Team 267x. Check back soon for regular updates.
 
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BajaboundMoto

Well-Known Member
.... and the motorcycle guy (Baja rookie) who pulled back onto the course in the dust of a truck and put himself right in front of Roger Norman. Survived but massive injuries.

Of course the OP @goneorange is worried about TT's, 1's, TTS's passing him, but maybe a bigger worry for a new guy are non-race cars on the course. Plenty of guys have hit non-race cars out there.
I've done maybe 70 SCORE Baja races on motos and tons of other long distance Baja races on motos, have run in the top couple OA plenty of times and have run as a back-marker... And there are ALWAYS vehicles out there that shouldn't be. Hundreds of close calls, a handful of near death experiences, clipped quite a few, and finally at the most recent Baja 500 running 3rd OA I got bit by a civilian car pulling out in front of me breaking both my hands ( and that's after avoiding 15+ non-race cars during my section). It's no joke @goneorange.

So, who here raced (bike or car) the 2013 Baja 1000 when the bikes/quads started at 11:30pm?
Any thoughts if that should happen again to double the gap from last quad to first TT?
 

Josh 8

Well-Known Member
The classic case of what your taking about is Danny Hamel. Dan Smith's really good friend.
 

johndjmix

Well-Known Member
Been thinking of maybe doing a rear view cammera that the co dawg can watch. For a slower/car truck that would seem to work well.

--John


Trophylite #6013
Dunarri LLC
WildPowerSports.com
coolermods.com
 

TecateRay

Well-Known Member
I know of one. David Bills at the SF 250 in about 2003. I cant remember who ran him over. But I do know Dan Smith the driver of the Enduro TT was the next driver through and stopped for the guy in the middle of course but there was nothing he could do but drag him out of the way.

I am sure a few more have happened.

I found the story online...

MARCH 15, 2003 -- 1620 Hours -- The 267X Sportsman Motorcycle team led by Angel Montiel of San Diego, California and the entire off-road racing community suffered a devastating blow during the SCORE Desert Series San Felipe 250 this morning.

With information provided to ORC staffers from multiple sources, some of who were on-scene and team members of the 267X team, the Off-Road.com staff is sad to report the death of David Bills, 33 years-old, of San Diego, California.

The motorcycle racer had just completed a rider change race mile 48. He took the motorcycle from Montiel, who had suffered his own crash at race mile three and was slow in getting to the pit exchange location. It wasn't long before the Trophy Trucks were speeding towards him. As he left the exchange location, team members reported two trophy trucks that passed at "blazing speed" near racemile 48. Team members at the pit location reported the first truck through racemile 48 was the #52 Trophy Truck of Juan Carlos Ibarra quickly followed by the #99 Riviera Trophy Truck of Nick Baldwin.

According to ORC sources, the accident occurred in a narrow section of the racecourse and radio reports were that the #99 Riviera Trophy Truck "clipped" the race bike driven by David Bills. Bob Steinberger, also known as "The Weatherman," broadcasted a "Code Red" as he received word of the accident on the frequency. Emergency operations and rescue were immediately dispatched to the location, however, any hope was short lived as it was reported only a few minutes later that the motorcycle racer was deceased.

Jesse Jones, driver of the PCI Race Radios #7 Trophy Truck, reported to ORC staffers that as he passed the downed motorcycle racer, he saw that the racer was only a few feet off the race course and was being attended to by another racer reportedly to be the #8 Trophy Truck of Dan Smith and Enduro Racing. Jesse Jones reported the racecourse at that area as being very narrow and heading into a blind sweeping turn.

The driver, David Bills, 33 years old, resided in San Diego, California. He was a night manager for the Ralph's grocery store chain in San Diego County. He moved to San Diego from Utah 13 years ago and was not married. This was his first race in Baja and was part of the team of sportsman riders formed and led by Angel Montiel.

ORC staffers were aware of the tragic incident as "The Weatherman" put the frequency on Code Red. It was later discovered that David Bills and Angel Montiel had shared the quiet ORC campfire the evening before the race. ORC staffers remember David Bills as enjoying the campfire with the small group of friends as most of the crowd turned in early for the 5:00 a.m. wake up call in the ORC camp.

After meeting with SCORE-International Director Sal Fish and his team of race staff, Team 267x left immediately for the United States. It has been reported that the Riviera Trophy Truck discontinued the race after the accident. The incident is under investigation.

The entire Off-Road.com staff sends our condolences to the friends and family of David Bills and Team 267x. Off-Road.com will be organizing support in the form of financial donations for the family and friends of David Bills and Team 267x. Check back soon for regular updates.
I was at the next Riviera pit that day in 2003. The #99 truck was pulled from the race at that point and did not continue. It was a while after the incident that the driver was informed of the severity of the incident.
 

rustyb

Well-Known Member
So, who here raced (bike or car) the 2013 Baja 1000 when the bikes/quads started at 11:30pm?
Any thoughts if that should happen again to double the gap from last quad to first TT?
I was the last quad off the line that night. I thought it worked well and was a great way to widen the gap. That said I don't think I'd advocate for it next year. 2013 was a loop and we had enough riders and crews so no one had to be up 2 nights in a row. With a peninsula run that could be difficult and I'd be more worried about a chase driver falling asleep than a rider getting run over on the course.
 
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