Novice question re: King triple bypass shocks / bump stops

John.4002

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So I've always run shocks with air bumps or hydraulic bumps, separate from the shock; building a new rig and after a discussion I'm considering a 2.5" King triple bypass shock, since I've been told the third bypass can be configured to serve the purpose of the bump stop.

Basically, shock has its set compression and rebound based on valving / adjustment, but the bypass is configured to firm up at full extension, absorbing the landing. Sounds good in theory, and will help with overall packaging; also sounds strange, and slightly bizarre. Anyone running shocks only, setup this way?
 

scottm

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A triple bypass shock usually has two compression bypass tubes and one rebound. When extended, the first half of travel has the least damping, not the most. The bumpstop effect comes in during the last 2 inches or so of compression travel where the piston goes beyond the compression bypass tubes, meaning all oil flows through the valving on the piston. The bumpstop effect then depends on the stiffness of the valving. IMO separate bumpstops are still necessary. No matter how stiff your shocks are valved, you will always hit something hard enough to bottom out. You have to deliberately design in a point where travel finally stops, and you don't want it to be the shock body going metal-to-metal.
 

EOR1488

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I guess there are some important questions. Most important what are you driving, application, travel, weight, purpose


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swiftracing5

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Agree with above, depends on if you are racing or not and how much weight the vehicle is. To be particular, it’s called a bump zone in the shock.

I’m not sure about kings but fox long compression tubes end before the shock bottoms out, so the tube in reality is not controlling the bump zone. The bump zone is created when the piston goes past that last tube and the oil has nowhere to go besides back down the shock body.

If you do not run bumps on a heavy prerunner or race car you will be changing out more than just seals when you Service the shocks.


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