NUNLEY #10 TT V2R and helo crash update

Tipracer

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Everyone, please visit www.fast-aid.org Although our group is new, none of us are new to desert racing or its dangers. One of our main goals is to train teams in Advanced First Aid / CPR. We want every team to have the tools necessary to treat the immediate needs of an injured driver/crew member. With knowledge comes power. You never want to be in the situation where you are helpless because of lack of training or tools.

We have big plans for our group but we need your help. We need your immediate support through fundraisers, enroll in safety classes and make donations of either money or goods that will go toward outfitting the trauma bags that each team who takes a class will receive.

We are more than safety classes though, God forbid, you or a member of your team is ever involved in a tragic racing accident and need help, we will be there for you. We will, when available offer financial aid to those injured, help you with resources that will aid in your recovery and rehabilitation.

Think of us as a RHR (Riders Helping Riders) or Rider Down but for all of you 4 wheeled friends.

So please check out our website, donate if you are able and please spread the word.

are you still doing the training in primm?...and if so how much are you charging?
 

kim

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My biggest concern is right after the crash no medical response team could get to the site. Two of the passengers were laid down in the back of a Dodge durango and the other laid over the console in the front seat. (no medical backboards). The ambulances had to wait at the highway nearly 5 miles away for the durango to arrive.

As part of a desert rescue team (not BITD), I am curious, 1) why were there no medical teams in the area and 2) why did the ambulances have to wait on the highway? Were they not 4-WD ?

This had to be absolutely heart wrenching to all those involved.
 

kim

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We are working on the details for the classes now. Stay tuned for more info. Will have an answer soon.
 

JB-13

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As part of a desert rescue team (not BITD), I am curious, 1) why were there no medical teams in the area and 2) why did the ambulances have to wait on the highway? Were they not 4-WD ?

This had to be absolutely heart wrenching to all those involved.

They had EMT's at pit 6 that I was at during the time of the crash and I was told that they were also at pit 5 (closest to the crash) but they had no way of getting on the course. Our pit crew that was at pit 5 wanted to get on to the course but the officials had no way of closing that much of it. The heli went down in a pretty rough area, I believe the only way to reach it was on the course. We too wondered why they had to be driven off course and then to the hospital, why no medivac? I was told and im not sure how true it is but to have be airlifted out Nevada requires an EMT to be on site and they have to be the one to call it in, unfortunately the only EMT at the site went down with the heli. And no they had NO 4-WD ambulances in the area, all three were transported with no neck or back support to the highway. I understand that everything that was done was with the best intentions and I am so thankful for all those that were there to help, but how terrible would it have been if more injuries were sustained while being transported.
 

bobylax

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As part of a desert rescue team (not BITD), I am curious, 1) why were there no medical teams in the area and 2) why did the ambulances have to wait on the highway? Were they not 4-WD ?

This had to be absolutely heart wrenching to all those involved.

This is pure speculation on my part, but unless the ambulance had a trail map of that area, there were so many different roads into and out of that area, in and out of canyons, that the BITD officials that knew the area very well thought it best to bring the injued to the ambulance than chase the ambulance all over the mountain, and we did have to cover about 2 miles of race course to get to were BITD could get them down the hill.
 

Chase 2

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Most likely there was at least one GPS at the scene (in the race truck if nothing else) providing a simple lat/lon...but, then the ambulance would need to have a GPS unit also.
 

billy1911

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It was a judgment call the first guys there from rm530 made to move them and get them to the highway. They also went straight to the highway, didnt try to meet the ambulance in the dirt so they didnt move them more then they needed. Its a tough call to make I have been at a seen of another accident were they didn't move the people and they died. From internal injuries.
 

Tomas

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Well now I am going to post. I am Tom O, the co-driver of the Nunley #10. First I want to thank everyone that was involved in helping us through the entire incident. I did see the chopper the entire time, and I along with Tom Carr removed Michelle and Duley, it is and was traumatic and I WILL NEVER FORGET what happened but I am thankful for all of the desert racers for asking. The ked kit idea is probably the best I have heard of through this whole thing. I did try something similar to the ked by having Michelle trying to slide out with me but it just did not work in this situation, I just kind of pushed the remaining part of the helicopter open and that brave woman got up enough strength to walk out with my help. I performed some simple nerve and body tests to make sure she was able to move her extremities before I moved her.(sp) We cut Duley's seatbelt and got him out after I was able to make sure that everyone was stable. We helped him get out and walk to the wash below along with Michelle. Victor unbelievably walked by himself. We were in a rush because fuel was pouring out behind Michelle and I and would not want to be so close to rescuing our friends and have an explosion happen. Thank God it did not and this is when the kind people in the Durango helped take our people to safety. It was and still is like I am in a dream just trying to wake up and start Day 2 again, but it is real. We at Nunley Racing are thankful again for all of your thoughts prayers and phone calls. I was a Volunteer Fireman for three years and hope that was what helped me through this, and that first responder class would be good for everyone to do. It would be great to have at least one crew member (driver or co-driver) be able to be certified for this and pack the kit in all of the vehicles, or have capable vehicles (4wd plus) at the checkpoints with the kits so we all could help whenever we need. I know that on Day 3 when we saw a 10 car upside down and needing a tow to be turned right side up Tom and I could not pull in fast enough to help. We knew we were blessed the day before and wanted to help whoever we could. Thanks again to everyone.
 

harleys dad

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That had to be one scary situation with the fuel poring out behind her head ready to ignite
 

BoothPacific Films

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the more i think about it the idea that people take a first responder class of some sort should almost be a requirement. you learn much more than just first aid. you learn how to come upon a scene and determine the dangers to the victims and rescuers. dangers like 100LL pouring out of the fuel tank. you also learn how to assess what needs to happen and in what order. the more i hear about all this, the more drivers, co-dawgs, and chase/pit crews need to be more self-sufficient when it comes to emergency situations. there needs to be backboards, splints and neck braces at every pit captain's setup, every checkpoint and every chase truck. these should be as standard as a jack and a tow rope.
 

Cinco-B

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As part of a desert rescue team (not BITD), I am curious, 1) why were there no medical teams in the area and 2) why did the ambulances have to wait on the highway? Were they not 4-WD ?

This had to be absolutely heart wrenching to all those involved.

All, thanks for all the prayers and concerns for my wife Michelle, Dooley, and Victor.
They are now all home resting and recovering.
As to the two questioons above; 1) it is impossible to have a medical team in every area of a race, especially this race 2) the three ambulances were not 4wd so could not drive to the site. By the time I drove back to pit 5 from pit 6 the Durango was driving them all out. Everyone at the crash site did a great job doing what they had to do. My concern is what if Tom hadnt seen the chopper go down and there was no checkpoint close by. How would you find the crash site? Or if Tom did see them go down and there was no one around to help and no radio contact? These scenarios are very realistic and this instance we are very blessed that this happened where it did. It took long enough (2 hours) to get them out with a perfect scenario (remember they were only 4-5 miles if that from the highway). Luckily for the three on board it just wasn't there time to go.
 

Jack

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There was a close call with one of these ambulances as it was passing pit #4 a big rig going the other way had to lock up and smoke all tires as the ambulance was passing.

Glad all worked out in this unfortunate event and all are recovering now.
 

Chase 2

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Here is the preliminary from NTSB. Final determinations usually take some time to compile.

NTSB Identification: WPR09LA411
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 21, 2009 in Tonopah, NV
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44, registration: N19DV
Injuries: 3 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On August 21, 2009, about 1500 Pacific daylight time, a Robinson R44 II, N19DV, collided with terrain near Tonopah, Nevada. Dooley Aviation, Inc., was operating the helicopter under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The certificated private pilot and two passengers sustained serious injuries. The helicopter sustained substantial damage from impact forces. The local personal flight departed Tonopah about 1400. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

One of the passengers reported that the helicopter was providing aerial surveillance of a car that was in an off-road race. He recalled the helicopter being in a bank, and hearing a warning horn. The helicopter then descended rapidly into uneven terrain. It touched down on the skids, but turned as it went downhill, and the helicopter rolled over.
 
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