• Forum membership has its advantages....

Parker race report for car 1077

robertharman

Well-Known Member
I am not much of a writer so go easy on me. I also posted this on FB.

Parker race report.

This year I teamed up with a long time racing friend Mike Duenas. We are teaming up for the Parker 425 in Mikes new single seat Jimco and the Mint 400 in my single seat Lothringer(depending on how Mikes car looked after the Parker).

Race day started without any problems. Unfortunately that didn't last for long. The plan was for Mike to start and do the first two laps and I would do the last lap

Mike started at approximately 6:15 am Arizona time. In typical Parker fashion he was soon out of radio range. Let the waiting game begin. The plan was to fuel each lap. I would be suited up at the end of the first lap just in case something happened. I really wasn't looking forward to wearing my driving suit, catheter and nomex underwear for an extra three hours if I didn't have to. Why would Mike want to get out of his new car after only one lap.

And then it happened.
As I am getting my gear bag out and looking for a place to start suiting up, I get the panicked report that Mike is only a couple miles out and doesn't feel good. He is getting out and I am getting in early. Great, time to speed dress and get ready to race. Until this point I have spent all of maybe 30 seconds to a minute in his car.

No problem, let's do this. I have been in this exact situation multiple times before. Unfortunately this time was not as easy as it had been in the past. As soon as I got out of the Python and got up to race speed I just felt like I couldn't get comfortable in the car. As I get into the rollers along Shea Road I start realizing how different the setup is from my car (no big deal, it's not my car), my job is just to drive the best I can.

I start clicking off miles and I'm getting a little more comfortable with the car. Then I feel it, "was that a wiggle"? A mile or so later there is no question. Rear flat, normally I am pretty good with tires and when I get a flat I usually deserve it. But this time I have no idea what I hit. I start watching the mile markers and realize I'm not that far from Cap Canal. Maybe I can make it. Nope. As treads start passing me I start to think I won't make it. Damn, time to change the tire myself.
Normally this wouldn't be such a big deal but I pretty much picked the worst place to stop and change a tire. The side of a hill in the soft sand/powder. First thing I do is get the jack out and start jacking up the car..why does it seem like it isn't going up? Is the jack not working? No, it's burying itself in the sand. Awesome. I look around for something to put under the jack but of course their are no rocks here. Really! I run over to the road and start looking around and find a rock, all right, maybe my luck is changing. Nope.
After forcing the rock into the sand with the jack I realize instead of picking up the car it is just pushing it down the hill. Ok, now it's getting comical, what else can go wrong. Lol. I finally come to the conclusion that I either have to put the lugs nuts back on. The car and load everything back in the car and move it, or start digging. Note to self, breaker bars do not make good shovels. I dig out enough get the flat tire off but not enough to get a tire with air back on. Somewhere around 30 minutes later I am finally putting the jack, lug wrench and flat tire back in the car. That is when I realize I can't tighten the spare down in the rack. This has definitely become the flat tire from hell.

I finally limp into the Checker pit at Cap Canal. The guys rack a new spare and make sure the tire i installed is good to go and send me on my way. I finally start getting in the groove and start knocking out the miles. By the time I get to Mineral Wash i am feeling really comfortable in the car, but not with the car.

After 140 miles of calling out mile markers every five miles I finally am able to talk to the pits. The first question I get is from Jeff Quinn "how is the car working? What do you want to change?" Normally I would not make a change to another persons car but I tell Jeff what it feels like and what I don't like about it. I let them know that it feels like the rear is pushing out too fast. Jeff asks if I want to stiffen up the front to help. I let them know that I would rather slow down the rear of the car because I think it's is a little too stiff for me. I pull into the main pit after what feels like an hour of driving at 25 mph. Jeff makes the adjustment he feels is correct on the rebound. After cleaning my visor, grabbing a drink and getting my fuel I am back on the race course, at 25 mph.

After what seems like another hour of waving, thumbs ups, shakes, and what ever other way people can cheer you on at 25 mph I finally am at the resume race speed sign.

Time to find out if I made the right call on the shocks.

I attack the first whoop section with the confidence I made the right decision (fingers crossed it was). The car soaks them up without the slightest hint of the push over feeling from the lap before. With spending the last 50 miles getting comfortable in the car, it now has the feeling that makes me comfortable with the car also (unfortunately this could also be my demise too).

From all of the down time on the first two laps I am now in the middle of the trophy lite pack. This is good because they are pretty well spread out so this is giving me a lot of clean air and bad because these things kick up a ton of dust and I can reel them in before they even know I'm chasing them down. I catch the first few in the wash next to Shea Road after a few alternate lines I am able to get past them and get into a nice long stretch of clean air.
I catch the next one about 15 miles later before Cap canal. I get past him before Cap and set my sights on the dust in front of him. I catch the next TL just after the pits at Cap. I get past him pretty quickly and see one more just a little bit ahead of me. I catch him right after we get into the single track. I don't know if these guys ever knew I was behind them because they never gave me a wave or made any attempt to give some space to make a pass. I follow these guys all the way to the stop check as close as I can without laying the bumper to them. We get to the stop check at the beginning of the fast graded road with me practically glued to their rear bumper. The course workers bring the TL to a complete stop with me right on top of them. They let him go and bring me to a complete stop also. This give the TL a little time to pull away from me and lay down a huge dust trail that I know have to contend with. I get the green light and the chase is back on.

I jump on the graded road right into a wall of dust. If there is any wind it is doing nothing to help. I start grabbing gears and start attacking, trying to take advantage of any open pocket of clean air I can get. Even though the TL has clean air in front of him I am still making up ground on him. Approximately two miles i am almost back on his bumper. I see a little clean air to the right, so I cheat to the right and start and start closing in on him. Then it happens.

The course has a slight rise with a slight left, but I can't see this. The TL makes the slight left but because I am cheated to the right and trying to look thru the dust and through his cab I do not see the turn until it is too late. My first reaction was to try and follow the course, which turned out to be the wrong decision.

I hit the embankment at the edge of the road with my wheels turned slightly to the left. This pops me out in the desert in a flat slide going sideways. As luck would have it, this is probably the worst situation to be in at this spot (Part way thru this left turn there is cross grain cut for drainage). The last thing I clearly remember at this point is the sensation of sliding sideways and feeling a slight lean into the slide. After this everything is speculation. I didn't lose consciousness but the roll was so fast and violent i still can not say what happened with 100% certainty.

I remember a very forceful push to the side of my head that forced me in the opposite direction of the roll ( I was probably already leaning away from the roll to begin with). After the car stopped rolling I realized I was on my side. Ok, time to my seat belts undone and get out of the car. This is when I realize that something is not right. I can't look around to get my bearings, I can't look around round to find the battery switch. I realize I can't move my head at all, this is when the panic sets in. My head and shoulders are forced over to the left and my helmet is trapped. I get the buckle on the seat belts undone but I can't get completely out of them because I am partially pinned in the seat. Since I am on my side none of the straps I want to find are where they should be. After the seat belt I undo the chest strap of my head and neck restraint. I have to do this to get my helmet skirt open because I tuck it under my HNR. Next I try and find the straps for the HNR but can't find them because nothing is where it should be. I resort to grabbing the rings on my helmet and getting the on the right to disengage but can't get the one on the left because of the way I am balled up in the car. Next thing I try is to get my helmet unbuckled to see if I can get my head out of it since I can't get my helmet to budge.

This is when I really start to panic. What if I still can not get out? At this point I still do not know why I cannot get out of the car and why I can't move my helmet. I hear one of TL's I passed drive by. Really. WTF. I am still trapped in the car and they don't even lift off the throttle for a second as they pass. This bring my panic mode even higher. I get the buckle on the helmet undone and start getting my head out, but then I get stopped by a wire, WTH. I grab it and yank it out, ouch, crap, those were my ear buds. Lol. My ear buds are now forcefully removed from my head and my helmet and now I can get my head completely out of the helmet. Then I hear another car coming, ok. Maybe this guy will stop and check on me, nope, he's motors right on by too.

Once my head is free of my helmet I am able to get my self upright inside the car. I open the right side net and am amble to stand up. I look down and find the battery switch and turn it off. I climb out of the car and a relief that I am no longer trapped washes over me. (I have to admit I was pretty scared there for a bit. Being trapped and unable to get free, not being able to look around and make sure no fluids or fuel are leaking from the car. Hearing cars drive right by while you are trapped and struggling to free you're self, that stuff will get to you). After I get out of the car I look around to get my bearings. Where am? Is the car off the course? Is there any fluids coming out that I need to worry about? I look down the course in the direction I had just come from. I can see the spectator are and the stop check, (i am not injured so if I have to I can hike back to the stop check). The car is off the course so that is good, ( it is on the outside of a turn so that isn't good - although I won't how bad of a spot this is until the unlimited race starts). No fluids are leaking, that is a huge relief after being trapped.

I give the car a quick look over. It is surprisingly in good shape. Besides the obvious aluminum roof that was bent around my head, the only thing I can see that looks off is the toe. I take a quick look at the front end to see why the toe is off, but after a quick look I can't see any thing. Tie rods look good, rack looks good. No obvious broken parts but I am pretty sure something is wrong, just not sure what at this point.

I get the jack and the spare tire out, time to see if I can get this hurt girl flipped back over. I start looking for a place the jack will fit without causing any unnecessary damage. The only place I can get the jack to fit is in the high side of the roof from the ground. Because of the shape of the jack I am only able to use the top of the jack (not sure of the type of jack but it kind of looks like a jack from a pick up truck camper shell) because the arm that is supposed to go under the car is up about 12-16" from the bottom. At first I am only able to get the car to lift an inch or so at a time. So I start with kicking dirt under the cage to get it up as much as I could before the jack slipped out. Pretty soon I am able to get a rock under the cage. Now i am starting to make some progress. Soon I have the spare on its side under the roof. Next I start kicking rocks and dirt under the spare to get it up a little higher each time before the jack slips again.

After about 20 minutes of getting the car to move inches I finally am able to get the foot on the jack under the low part of the roof. Now I am starting to make some really good progress, I am able to get the car up about 4 or 5 inches before I have to move move the jack or the tire to reposition my rocks and dirt mound.

I get the car high enough to get the tire vertical under the roof. At this point I am out of all of the easy ways to get more height out the jack and the tire. As soon as I start looking around for more rocks I start to hear that familiar sound. Helicopters. Crap. The unlimited race is almost on top of me.

I keep trying to get the car a little higher until I can see the first TT coming down the road at me. I move myself and my helmet and gloves away from the car and wait for the truck to pass. As soon as he goes by I figure I have about a minute before the next car/TT comes thru. I go back to work until I hear the next vehicle. I step back and watch them go by, then it's back to work. I hear the third car coming, and he's coming in hot. I back up and he hits the same edge of the course that I hit (only he is going about 30 plus miles per hour faster and his car weighs at least twice the weight). Instead of going out in the desert like I did, he starts flat spinning down the course. Wow, that was crazy. Now I start to realize just how bad of a spot I am in. I keep trying to roll the car back over one minute at a time, until another TT hits the same spot and almost hits the car. I am starting to realize that trying to roll the car over is no longer a good idea, instead I just try and stay visible to the cars coming down the course so they know something is going on up ahead. This seems to be working ok until about the 17th or 18th vehicle starts coming into view, I realize he is not going to make the turn so I start running. He misses the turn going about 115 mph and sends the truck out in the desert to miss the car. That was scary as hell and kind of awesome at the same time. After this I make the decision to just get away from the car and go up the course to a more visible and safer spot and finish watching the second race go by.

A little while after the majority of the second race goes by I get a call from my friend Mike (the car owner), he can see me and is walking out with some waters and to try and help with the car. About this time the BITD medical team races out to check on me. Apparently when you send the generic message to BITD, it is a medical alert (oops, my bad, but nice to finally see someone). I get the medical team to hook on to the car with their tow strap and we get the car back on its wheels. Next we get them to pull the car away from the course to a safer spot. All in all the car is in pretty good shape, except for the smashed in aluminum roof and the one broken a arm. We decide to turn on the batteries and see if she will start. She cranks over a few times and fires right up. We figure since the lower arm is intact and the car runs we will try and limp it out to the trailer. About halfway back to the trailer retrieval finally shows up (better late than never, I guess). We are able to drive the car to the trailer and load her up. And this is how our weekend ends, battered and bruised.

Time to get my car ready for the Mint and try again.
 

robertharman

Well-Known Member
Here are a couple of pics to go with the report.
ImageUploadedByrace-deZert1487131078.903188.jpg
ImageUploadedByrace-deZert1487131096.518822.jpg
ImageUploadedByrace-deZert1487131107.342893.jpg
ImageUploadedByrace-deZert1487131120.523295.jpg
ImageUploadedByrace-deZert1487131130.505999.jpg



Sent from the RDC Mobile App. Get it for your IOS device today
 

Fourstroker

Well-Known Member
Ouch. Glad youre OK
 

Mark Carter 997

Well-Known Member
I am not much of a writer so go easy on me. I also posted this on FB.

Parker race report.

This year I teamed up with a long time racing friend Mike Duenas. We are teaming up for the Parker 425 in Mikes new single seat Jimco and the Mint 400 in my single seat Lothringer(depending on how Mikes car looked after the Parker).

Race day started without any problems. Unfortunately that didn't last for long. The plan was for Mike to start and do the first two laps and I would do the last lap

Mike started at approximately 6:15 am Arizona time. In typical Parker fashion he was soon out of radio range. Let the waiting game begin. The plan was to fuel each lap. I would be suited up at the end of the first lap just in case something happened. I really wasn't looking forward to wearing my driving suit, catheter and nomex underwear for an extra three hours if I didn't have to. Why would Mike want to get out of his new car after only one lap.

And then it happened.
As I am getting my gear bag out and looking for a place to start suiting up, I get the panicked report that Mike is only a couple miles out and doesn't feel good. He is getting out and I am getting in early. Great, time to speed dress and get ready to race. Until this point I have spent all of maybe 30 seconds to a minute in his car.

No problem, let's do this. I have been in this exact situation multiple times before. Unfortunately this time was not as easy as it had been in the past. As soon as I got out of the Python and got up to race speed I just felt like I couldn't get comfortable in the car. As I get into the rollers along Shea Road I start realizing how different the setup is from my car (no big deal, it's not my car), my job is just to drive the best I can.

I start clicking off miles and I'm getting a little more comfortable with the car. Then I feel it, "was that a wiggle"? A mile or so later there is no question. Rear flat, normally I am pretty good with tires and when I get a flat I usually deserve it. But this time I have no idea what I hit. I start watching the mile markers and realize I'm not that far from Cap Canal. Maybe I can make it. Nope. As treads start passing me I start to think I won't make it. Damn, time to change the tire myself.
Normally this wouldn't be such a big deal but I pretty much picked the worst place to stop and change a tire. The side of a hill in the soft sand/powder. First thing I do is get the jack out and start jacking up the car..why does it seem like it isn't going up? Is the jack not working? No, it's burying itself in the sand. Awesome. I look around for something to put under the jack but of course their are no rocks here. Really! I run over to the road and start looking around and find a rock, all right, maybe my luck is changing. Nope.
After forcing the rock into the sand with the jack I realize instead of picking up the car it is just pushing it down the hill. Ok, now it's getting comical, what else can go wrong. Lol. I finally come to the conclusion that I either have to put the lugs nuts back on. The car and load everything back in the car and move it, or start digging. Note to self, breaker bars do not make good shovels. I dig out enough get the flat tire off but not enough to get a tire with air back on. Somewhere around 30 minutes later I am finally putting the jack, lug wrench and flat tire back in the car. That is when I realize I can't tighten the spare down in the rack. This has definitely become the flat tire from hell.

I finally limp into the Checker pit at Cap Canal. The guys rack a new spare and make sure the tire i installed is good to go and send me on my way. I finally start getting in the groove and start knocking out the miles. By the time I get to Mineral Wash i am feeling really comfortable in the car, but not with the car.

After 140 miles of calling out mile markers every five miles I finally am able to talk to the pits. The first question I get is from Jeff Quinn "how is the car working? What do you want to change?" Normally I would not make a change to another persons car but I tell Jeff what it feels like and what I don't like about it. I let them know that it feels like the rear is pushing out too fast. Jeff asks if I want to stiffen up the front to help. I let them know that I would rather slow down the rear of the car because I think it's is a little too stiff for me. I pull into the main pit after what feels like an hour of driving at 25 mph. Jeff makes the adjustment he feels is correct on the rebound. After cleaning my visor, grabbing a drink and getting my fuel I am back on the race course, at 25 mph.

After what seems like another hour of waving, thumbs ups, shakes, and what ever other way people can cheer you on at 25 mph I finally am at the resume race speed sign.

Time to find out if I made the right call on the shocks.

I attack the first whoop section with the confidence I made the right decision (fingers crossed it was). The car soaks them up without the slightest hint of the push over feeling from the lap before. With spending the last 50 miles getting comfortable in the car, it now has the feeling that makes me comfortable with the car also (unfortunately this could also be my demise too).

From all of the down time on the first two laps I am now in the middle of the trophy lite pack. This is good because they are pretty well spread out so this is giving me a lot of clean air and bad because these things kick up a ton of dust and I can reel them in before they even know I'm chasing them down. I catch the first few in the wash next to Shea Road after a few alternate lines I am able to get past them and get into a nice long stretch of clean air.
I catch the next one about 15 miles later before Cap canal. I get past him before Cap and set my sights on the dust in front of him. I catch the next TL just after the pits at Cap. I get past him pretty quickly and see one more just a little bit ahead of me. I catch him right after we get into the single track. I don't know if these guys ever knew I was behind them because they never gave me a wave or made any attempt to give some space to make a pass. I follow these guys all the way to the stop check as close as I can without laying the bumper to them. We get to the stop check at the beginning of the fast graded road with me practically glued to their rear bumper. The course workers bring the TL to a complete stop with me right on top of them. They let him go and bring me to a complete stop also. This give the TL a little time to pull away from me and lay down a huge dust trail that I know have to contend with. I get the green light and the chase is back on.

I jump on the graded road right into a wall of dust. If there is any wind it is doing nothing to help. I start grabbing gears and start attacking, trying to take advantage of any open pocket of clean air I can get. Even though the TL has clean air in front of him I am still making up ground on him. Approximately two miles i am almost back on his bumper. I see a little clean air to the right, so I cheat to the right and start and start closing in on him. Then it happens.

The course has a slight rise with a slight left, but I can't see this. The TL makes the slight left but because I am cheated to the right and trying to look thru the dust and through his cab I do not see the turn until it is too late. My first reaction was to try and follow the course, which turned out to be the wrong decision.

I hit the embankment at the edge of the road with my wheels turned slightly to the left. This pops me out in the desert in a flat slide going sideways. As luck would have it, this is probably the worst situation to be in at this spot (Part way thru this left turn there is cross grain cut for drainage). The last thing I clearly remember at this point is the sensation of sliding sideways and feeling a slight lean into the slide. After this everything is speculation. I didn't lose consciousness but the roll was so fast and violent i still can not say what happened with 100% certainty.

I remember a very forceful push to the side of my head that forced me in the opposite direction of the roll ( I was probably already leaning away from the roll to begin with). After the car stopped rolling I realized I was on my side. Ok, time to my seat belts undone and get out of the car. This is when I realize that something is not right. I can't look around to get my bearings, I can't look around round to find the battery switch. I realize I can't move my head at all, this is when the panic sets in. My head and shoulders are forced over to the left and my helmet is trapped. I get the buckle on the seat belts undone but I can't get completely out of them because I am partially pinned in the seat. Since I am on my side none of the straps I want to find are where they should be. After the seat belt I undo the chest strap of my head and neck restraint. I have to do this to get my helmet skirt open because I tuck it under my HNR. Next I try and find the straps for the HNR but can't find them because nothing is where it should be. I resort to grabbing the rings on my helmet and getting the on the right to disengage but can't get the one on the left because of the way I am balled up in the car. Next thing I try is to get my helmet unbuckled to see if I can get my head out of it since I can't get my helmet to budge.

This is when I really start to panic. What if I still can not get out? At this point I still do not know why I cannot get out of the car and why I can't move my helmet. I hear one of TL's I passed drive by. Really. WTF. I am still trapped in the car and they don't even lift off the throttle for a second as they pass. This bring my panic mode even higher. I get the buckle on the helmet undone and start getting my head out, but then I get stopped by a wire, WTH. I grab it and yank it out, ouch, crap, those were my ear buds. Lol. My ear buds are now forcefully removed from my head and my helmet and now I can get my head completely out of the helmet. Then I hear another car coming, ok. Maybe this guy will stop and check on me, nope, he's motors right on by too.

Once my head is free of my helmet I am able to get my self upright inside the car. I open the right side net and am amble to stand up. I look down and find the battery switch and turn it off. I climb out of the car and a relief that I am no longer trapped washes over me. (I have to admit I was pretty scared there for a bit. Being trapped and unable to get free, not being able to look around and make sure no fluids or fuel are leaking from the car. Hearing cars drive right by while you are trapped and struggling to free you're self, that stuff will get to you). After I get out of the car I look around to get my bearings. Where am? Is the car off the course? Is there any fluids coming out that I need to worry about? I look down the course in the direction I had just come from. I can see the spectator are and the stop check, (i am not injured so if I have to I can hike back to the stop check). The car is off the course so that is good, ( it is on the outside of a turn so that isn't good - although I won't how bad of a spot this is until the unlimited race starts). No fluids are leaking, that is a huge relief after being trapped.

I give the car a quick look over. It is surprisingly in good shape. Besides the obvious aluminum roof that was bent around my head, the only thing I can see that looks off is the toe. I take a quick look at the front end to see why the toe is off, but after a quick look I can't see any thing. Tie rods look good, rack looks good. No obvious broken parts but I am pretty sure something is wrong, just not sure what at this point.

I get the jack and the spare tire out, time to see if I can get this hurt girl flipped back over. I start looking for a place the jack will fit without causing any unnecessary damage. The only place I can get the jack to fit is in the high side of the roof from the ground. Because of the shape of the jack I am only able to use the top of the jack (not sure of the type of jack but it kind of looks like a jack from a pick up truck camper shell) because the arm that is supposed to go under the car is up about 12-16" from the bottom. At first I am only able to get the car to lift an inch or so at a time. So I start with kicking dirt under the cage to get it up as much as I could before the jack slipped out. Pretty soon I am able to get a rock under the cage. Now i am starting to make some progress. Soon I have the spare on its side under the roof. Next I start kicking rocks and dirt under the spare to get it up a little higher each time before the jack slips again.

After about 20 minutes of getting the car to move inches I finally am able to get the foot on the jack under the low part of the roof. Now I am starting to make some really good progress, I am able to get the car up about 4 or 5 inches before I have to move move the jack or the tire to reposition my rocks and dirt mound.

I get the car high enough to get the tire vertical under the roof. At this point I am out of all of the easy ways to get more height out the jack and the tire. As soon as I start looking around for more rocks I start to hear that familiar sound. Helicopters. Crap. The unlimited race is almost on top of me.

I keep trying to get the car a little higher until I can see the first TT coming down the road at me. I move myself and my helmet and gloves away from the car and wait for the truck to pass. As soon as he goes by I figure I have about a minute before the next car/TT comes thru. I go back to work until I hear the next vehicle. I step back and watch them go by, then it's back to work. I hear the third car coming, and he's coming in hot. I back up and he hits the same edge of the course that I hit (only he is going about 30 plus miles per hour faster and his car weighs at least twice the weight). Instead of going out in the desert like I did, he starts flat spinning down the course. Wow, that was crazy. Now I start to realize just how bad of a spot I am in. I keep trying to roll the car back over one minute at a time, until another TT hits the same spot and almost hits the car. I am starting to realize that trying to roll the car over is no longer a good idea, instead I just try and stay visible to the cars coming down the course so they know something is going on up ahead. This seems to be working ok until about the 17th or 18th vehicle starts coming into view, I realize he is not going to make the turn so I start running. He misses the turn going about 115 mph and sends the truck out in the desert to miss the car. That was scary as hell and kind of awesome at the same time. After this I make the decision to just get away from the car and go up the course to a more visible and safer spot and finish watching the second race go by.

A little while after the majority of the second race goes by I get a call from my friend Mike (the car owner), he can see me and is walking out with some waters and to try and help with the car. About this time the BITD medical team races out to check on me. Apparently when you send the generic message to BITD, it is a medical alert (oops, my bad, but nice to finally see someone). I get the medical team to hook on to the car with their tow strap and we get the car back on its wheels. Next we get them to pull the car away from the course to a safer spot. All in all the car is in pretty good shape, except for the smashed in aluminum roof and the one broken a arm. We decide to turn on the batteries and see if she will start. She cranks over a few times and fires right up. We figure since the lower arm is intact and the car runs we will try and limp it out to the trailer. About halfway back to the trailer retrieval finally shows up (better late than never, I guess). We are able to drive the car to the trailer and load her up. And this is how our weekend ends, battered and bruised.

Time to get my car ready for the Mint and try again.
Sorry to hear y'all had a rough day of racing. Glad everyone ended up safe with minimum damage to the car. Your write-up was great. You were very detail oriented which makes for an easier visual imagery when reading. I could almost feel your struggle. Not fun I'm sure. I wish other racers would do write-ups like this (with good & not so good outcomes). Thanks for taking the time to write it. Reading longer stories like yours makes the work day go faster (not productive....but faster). Looking forward to future stories (hopefully with better endings).

Sent from my VS987 using Tapatalk
 
Top