Prep Tech

ntsqd

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I thot I'd see if maybe I can start a thread on hints for prepping for races. I see some lack of knowledge that could cost a race and hopefully this thread can become some sort of bible, should it get that far, on hints and pointers to raise the level of prep. There are others with far more experience than I out there, I hope that they think this worthwhile and offer some hints & suggestions.
I'll start it off with a couple things I consider crucial:

Locktite: There are very few instances where I wouldn't use it. Header bolts being one. I keep a bottle of light duty green (penetrates assemblies), blue, and red handy. Get by your local industrial supplier and pick up some of their literature or go see what Locktite has on the net. There is a lot to learn in this area.

Bolts I: My understanding of the aircraft SOP is to secure critical bolts with three methods. I've not had A&P training, but the approach works for race vehicles. The odds of three retention devices all failing on the same bolt are pretty slim. There are 3 common methods: Safety wire, Self Locking fasteners, and Chemical (Locktite and Super Weatherstrip Adhesive b4 it.) When I can't drill the nut or bolt corner for wire for some reason, I drill the end of the threads and tighten some wire just against the threads. That way, even if the nut comes loose, it can't completely un-thread & fall off.

Bolts II: If the service is severe, replace the bolt frequently. There are some cases where you never put the old bolt back in. On reassembly you use a new bolt. Rod bolts are a good example. If the service is severe enough, use an NAS, MS, or similar quality bolt. Grade 8 is far inferior to any of these.

Parts Assembly: Seems simple but if you put something on the race vehicle do not stop until it is tight and ready to go. All too commonly position or a race is lost because something fell off or got loose because the installer allowed him/herself to be interupted. Don't allow it. Finish the job or take the part off so that everyone else doesn't assume it's ready to go.

Safety Wire: Buy yourself a quality set of Safety Wire pliers. The onerous task of safety wiring things become much simpler and you'll be surprised at where you use safety wire that you didn't b4.

TS

"It only seems kinky the first time"
-- Bumpersticker seen in Lost Wages
 

tkr

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Re: "(Locktite and Super Weatherstrip Adhesive b4 it.)"

That's one I haven't heard of before. You're saying to put the Super Weatherstrip Adhesive on the bolt before the locktite? How does it help?

Matt Nelson
Team Kwik Racing
 

BlueCoyote

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Great thead idea!
You have some excellent points here. Being an A&P, figure I will add some more:
1. Have a plan - Create a check list. Just like an aircraft inspector has a detialed inspection check list, do the same thing for the car. Each section (suspension, engine, trans, body, ets) has a section with individaul prep (inspection) lines. One step furhter would be to keep a set of log books detailing construction, parts installed, repairs and inspections - this will allow you to see what was done and when along with tracking trends
2. - Re inspect - two eyes are better that one. My hanger rule was nothing left until someone else did a quick look over of your work. Everyone can make a mistake or overlook something. Better bruised ego that a broken race car.
3. - One thing at a time - do not tear the entire thing apart - develop a system, finish one section or major part before tearing something else apart. If you must stop for parts, detail what has been done, put it aside and then move on,
4. - Cleanliness is next to godliness - enought said.
5 - Saftey wire and cotter pins. Use them when and where ever. You can buy a fixture for drilling cotter pin holes in bolts. Many times it is faster to pull cotter pins that saftey wire.
6 Have spares - it is always the simple stuff that will fail - filters, fuses, hoses, etc.
7. - Locktite - use it correctly and sparingly. It is fine for fastners with nuts, but do I do not reccomend it for blind fastners (such as bolts into a casting). If and when the body or head breaks off, you will play hell try to get that broken part out if it has been locktiteed in. Better to use a drilled head bolt and saftey wire.

Ken

Who are you calling Coyote ugly?
84 Toyota p/u Rokrawlr
86 4rnr
80 Toyota MDR Project
 

ntsqd

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Super Weatherstrip Adhesive was used sort of like Locktite long b4 Locktite became commonly available. Generally it was applied to the exposed threads past the nut. Old dez racer trick.

TS

"It only seems kinky the first time"
-- Bumpersticker seen in Lost Wages
 

ntsqd

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"7. - Locktite - use it correctly and sparingly. It is fine for fastners with nuts, but do I do not reccomend it for blind fastners (such as bolts into a casting). If and when the body or head breaks off, you will play hell try to get that broken part out if it has been locktiteed in. Better to use a drilled head bolt and saftey wire. "

This brings to mind something I do for my own stuff, not sure that it should be done in every case. If the casting that a frequently R&R'd bolt threads into is aluminum or really hard to get to with a drill while assembled, I put a Helicoil in from the start. The small block Ford lower T-stat housing bolt hole is a prime example of this.

A non std application for red Locktite that I was taught is to use it on shim washer stacks. Once you have set the shim stack, put a drop of red Locktite btwn each washer pair. This makes it easier to assemble the stack and keeps the stack consistant.


TS

"It only seems kinky the first time"
-- Bumpersticker seen in Lost Wages
 

MNotary

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A non std application for red Locktite that I was taught is to use it on shim washer stacks. Once you have set the shim stack, put a drop of red Locktite btwn each washer pair. This makes it easier to assemble the stack and keeps the stack consistant.


What "shim washer stack"?
 

Kritter

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Sounds like a neeya rig to me if you have to use shim stacks unless you are talking shocks but then you wouldnt need loctite.

Kris
<A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.dmsrace.com>www.dmsrace.com</A>
"Jesus loves you, everybody else thinks you're an A-hole"
 

ntsqd

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"What "shim washer stack"?"

In some places on road race cars AN washers are used to make an AN bolt come out the right length. This is accepted practice. It is far better to have use a couple of washers on a bolt so that the nut does not bottom out on the shoulder than it is to use a bolt whose shoulder does not protrude thru the assembly far enough. That is one reason why AN washers are supposedly hardened. And you never, ever cut more threads on a bolt with a die. Most of the places I've worked anyone found doing that (cutting more threads) would be fired on the spot.
Or they may be used to set some alignment semi-permanently, i.e. less permanent than a dedicated spacer can be justified for and enough permanent that it may come apart & go back together a couple of times b4 it is changed.

TS

"It only seems kinky the first time"
-- Bumpersticker seen in Lost Wages
 

MNotary

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Yea, right. I knew that, really... Up to two under the head and two under the nut to get the correct grip length. So is the loctite to "stick" them together?
 

ntsqd

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"Yea, right. I knew that, really... Up to two under the head and two under the nut to get the correct grip length. So is the loctite to "stick" them together?"


Yup, makes the bolt just over the top of the trans where you can't see it that much easier to put in.

TS

"It only seems kinky the first time"
-- Bumpersticker seen in Lost Wages
 
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