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Prepping a Wildcat XX for the Mexican 1000 -- noob questions

#1
Hi:
While I've never raced in the desert before, one of my best friends and I decided that we want to enter the Mexican 1000 next year in production UTV class. His brother in law has a lot of experience rally racing and my friend and I have 8 years in road course endurance racing (24 Hours of Lemons). We are going to field a two vehicle team of 2018 Textron Wildcat XX UTVs. We settled on this based on what seems to be a more stable design for the rear suspension vs the RZR 1000. I know that there are rental options AND there are also non-competitive Baja options but this is what we want to do (it helps that my friends BIL already has the RV/trailer and workshop). I'm working through the logistics/planning right now as we plan our modifications (and await the delivery of the second UTV) and I had a few questions that I'm hoping you folks can help us answer since all three of us are new to desert racing.


Our overall philosophy is that we want to race in the stock UTV class because the Mexican 1000 is likely a one and done race for us (we will either resell the UTVs afterwards OR keep them to play in the Idaho area). We don't care if we leave "powah" on the table as the goal is to have fun and that means racing from start to finish (vs wrenching every night and/or the whole time). If some of you folks can answer one/some/all of these questions, we'd really appreciate it.

I know this is a super long list but I appreciate the time you folks might take to answer my questions.
Regards,
-gunn (yes, that's really my name)


Major Qs
Q: Our plan is to go with 32" tires and Method beadlock wheels. I know from open course racing that the increased unsprung weight and tire diameter over stock will effectively reduce acceleration. As I understand it, the solution is to upgrade the clutch (change some weights and springs). What I'm not sure is how the extra diameter and weight affects reliability. Our initial feeling is that if running the stock clutch + 32" tires just hurts acceleration, we are willing to leave "acceleration" on the table if it means we can stay as close to stock as possible. If the added weight reduces the redline (I seem to have read that it might limit max RPM - please confirm) and therefore top speed, we might be OK with that too if it means we can keep the stock clutch (and benefit from the tens of thousands of users using that specific clutch and reporting issues vs. the tens or hundreds who will have upgraded their clutches with our specific combination of parts). I've taken a look at the videos of the clutch job itself and while i'm not worried about doing that in the workshop, I'm not excited about doing that in the desert. I've also read about some people using the stock clutch+32" tires and experiencing premature clutch wear. Can you explain why? Finally, it's not clear in the NORRA notes if clutch upgrades are allowed in Stock UTV class but I plan to check into this before buying anything.

Q: What seats & harnesses do you guys prefer to use? The NORRA rules allow for stock seats but the two parts that scare both the BIL and me are a) the stock seats don't seem to have an allowance for a submarine belt (we want to go with a 6pt setup) and b) they also recline (which I know from open course racing can break in an accident) even if welded into a fixed position). The BIL plans to reuse some of his rally seats but since our lemons car is in SF and we are doing the builds in Idaho, we plan on buying new seats & harnesses for the UTV. Do you folks have any suggestions?
- For my UTV, I was thinking of something like the BIMARCO GRIP Halo seats (FIA rated fiberglass halo seats at a much more affordable price point than anything from SPARCO. I need to confirm the width) or maybe the BIMARCO HAMMER. I've also used Corbeau Forza seats.
- sub Q: Do people even use halo seats in desert racing w/ UTVs?
- sub Q: I've heard of "suspension seats" being mentioned but can you point me to a specific example that you recommend for UTVs?

Q: A-ARM protection. Are these mostly cosmetic or do they have value for desert racing? On one hand, something hitting the UHMW or Aluminum guards means it's not hitting the forward mounted steering rod ends or the ARMs. OTOH, if they get bent (something allegedly more common with aluminum vs UHMW), they could interfere with the front suspension bits and we'll need to stop and remove them. Also, since they seem to be mounted using the same bolts as the suspension, wouldn't they also place extra stress on these mount points in the event of an accident? I'm more OK replacing a steering rod than trying to reweld up the mount point.

Q: Forced Air Belt Cooler. We already plan to add an infrared belt gauge since knowing how hot that gets will allow you to decide to back off or risk having to swap for a belt swap.
Apparently, forcing air down the stock (there seem to be two on the Wildcat XX) intake tracts using a bilge pump like FAN OR cutting a hole in the stock belt cover for a secondary intake is something people will do as a kit or DIY. Others talk about running in the dunes without a cover (not going to do it) or cutting holes and putting frog skin vents on the (also, not going to do it as this seems like a very minimal amount of filtering). One interesting comment I read is that while they improve airflow onto the belt at low speeds, the inline fans become restrictions at high speeds. Finally, I've read comments about putting the fan on the EXHAUST outlet; thereby increasing airflow sometimes AND acting as a vacuum but i have yet to see a specific kit for ANY UTV designed around this exhaust vs intake concept. For Baja racing, what makes sense?

Q: Should we plan for a full windshield or NOT? NORRA says optional. I suspect we'll want one but I'd like confirmation. Also, do people bother with wipers (the $50 manual ones)?

Q: We are debating the personal cooling. I know that a forced air system is all but necessary ($300) but how many people do this desert racing with one of the fancier coolshirt air+water systems (~$1400)? There's room in the UTV for it behind the passenger but I'm also wondering if these systems can be plumbed for 2 users (aka 2 cool shirts and 2 helmets). My friend and I are on the fence here but the BIL is up to spending the cost difference. If so, what systems do you guys use/prefer? Baja is supposed to be in the 80s in April.

Q: Switching filters everyday. In speaking to some folks who rent UTVs for the Mexican 1000, they say to plan to swap the belt and the filter everyday. That's fine. What we are debating internally is whether it makes sense just to use an OE filter (with a pre-filter on it) OR to use a K&N. The BIL swears by them since he's used them for 20+ years rally racing. I'm more skeptical since my understanding of the oiled filter is that a) oil attracts dust and b) part of the reason K&N makes more "powah" is that it inherently filters less to allow more airflow. Neither idea seems appealing to my friend and I in a super dusty environment. For those with Baja/desert experience, what do you guys do? Also, aftermarket pre-filter or just panty hose? I'm OK with either.

Minor Qs
Q: The Mexican 1000 seems to be mostly a day race done in stages. We already plan on buying a light bar JUST IN CASE but what do people do with visors? I suspect that tearoffs are used but what about colored lenses? I already have an SA2015 helmet with air intake capability (ZAMP RZ44c) so I was wondering if I should buy a second lens (dark smoke, iridium, Amber, etc).

Q: What comm systems do you guys prefer for driver to co-driver communication. The BIL plans to leverage his HAM radio setup (baofengs which can be setup to use any frequency specified by NORRA/MAG7) for the RV and UTV and we will likely jump on that bandwagon to keep everything in sync but if you folks have any specific intercom recommendations, I'm all ears.
 
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BigBlue&Goldie

Well-Known Member
#2
So you are using the least developed UTV platform on the market because you think it has a better rear suspension than the most developed UTV platform in desert racing? I'm not saying the Wildcat is bad, but there is virtually no aftermarket for them yet, so you will likely have to fab everything. Your other racing/car building experience won't translate to building desert cars. Your best bet, and cheapest, is to buy a couple of completely built RACE RZR's or CanAm X3's. Don't take this the wrong way, but based on the questions you are asking, you really need somebody that knows what they are doing if you do go through with your plan.
 
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Zambo

Well-Known Member
#3
It would be a lot easier to buy a vehicle as mentioned, but I know that building one is half the fun so.....I don't know much about the wildcat and I have precisely 1 UTV race under my belt (NORRA 18) but I'll try to answer a few of your questions.

1. I'm sure there are Wildcat forums that will have a lot of vehicle specific info that you're not going to find here. This place is probably better for general race questions concerning logistics and such.

2. 32" tires are probably the way to go. Look for tires that are light weight for the best handling IMO, such as the Tensor DS. I'd test with the stock clutch and see how it works before worrying about tuning it. If you can buy an entire clutch as a spare that is waaaay better than trying to fix a broken clutch. A lot of times some guy who is upgrading to a billet unobtainium clutch will sell his stocker.

3. I wasn't aware that the Wildcat didn't have a clutch fan. Get that Razorback gauge (its the only IR temp gauge I know of) and see how hot your belt runs before you make all those fan mods.

4. You don't need a windshield or any of that cooling stuff. Just a pumper and some decent helmets with a good intercom and radio. The Wildcat seems to be set up for mounting this stuff better than most UTVs. Wear a clear visor and bring a spare or two for when they get scratched. Most guys wear sunglasses underneath in the daytime. I have bought tinted safety glasses for racing that I can just throw aside if we get into night. PCI, Rugged, Palomar, etc can set you up with a good clear intercom and VHf radio. I'd leave the ham radio at home. Make sure the helmets have good modern comm kits installed....ones that are even a few years old tend to bad mics and low speaker volume.

5. You will probably need some light at least on a day or two. Overhead light bars are of limited use IMO, they just make a lot of glare. Plus the electrical system is busy running radios, pumpers, gps, etc and every electron is important. Get a couple of Baja Designs XL80s or a 20" Onyx bar for the front bumper and you should be fine.

6. No idea how the Wildcat filter is set up but I run stock paper filters on my x3 with an S/B particle separator and it stays nice and clean. I used 3 filters during the 5 day race but probably could have done the whole thing on one. I used to have a TwinAir foam filter and IMO it didn't do a good job getting all the dust and it was a nasty PITA to clean.

7. Definitely don't run a reclining seat. NRG makes a very economical tub seat that I've run in my last two race vehicles with zero issues or discomfort. Not a big fan of suspension seats but some guys love them. Most desert guys use a 5 point harness. I'd also recommend an HNR, even if its one of those cheaper Ztech units. Not only is it safer but it actually helps quite a bit with fatigue IMO. I have a padded harness for when I go out on trail rides but I also have a plain harness with 2" shoulder straps for racing with the HNR.

8. Generally there is a lot of clearance under your A-arms so I wouldn't bother with guards. My trailing arms however hung quite a bit lower and I put UHMW guards on them and I pulled the guards every night to check for cracks. These were stock trailing arms and my front lowers were chromoly.

9. You need spares. Trailing arm, A-arm, tie rod, axles, etc as well as tires and the aforementioned clutch and obviously belts. Keep an eye out of the classifieds (especially on wildcat forums) for take offs such as radiators, fans, carrier bearings, bushings, or anything else than can get damaged, seize up or wear out.

Good luck. The Wildcat that ran last year had some pretty impressive stage times. I think its a good car but obviously not a ton of races on it yet.
 
#4
So you are using the least developed UTV platform on the market because you think it has a better rear suspension than the most developed UTV platform in desert racing? I'm not saying the Wildcat is bad, but there is virtually no aftermarket for them yet, so you will likely have to fab everything. Your other racing/car building experience won't translate to building desert cars. Your best bet, and cheapest, is to buy a couple of completely built RACE RZR's or CanAm X3's. Don't take this the wrong way, but based on the questions you are asking, you really need somebody that knows what they are doing if you do go through with your plan.
These are fair points but it's not 100% my and my friends decision. If we did this alone, we'd probably lean towards renting a UTV.
However, his new BIL is set on the Wildcat XX and he brings to the party a lot more support (and quite frankly offroad experience) that we'd field alone. Also, going with his choice in vehicle allows us to share a LOT when it comes to spares. Since we now have a way to tow the vehicle from home to Baja and back, jumping on his chosen bandwagon is a viable option.
 
#5
It would be a lot easier to buy a vehicle as mentioned, but I know that building one is half the fun so.....I don't know much about the wildcat and I have precisely 1 UTV race under my belt (NORRA 18) but I'll try to answer a few of your questions.

1. I'm sure there are Wildcat forums that will have a lot of vehicle specific info that you're not going to find here. This place is probably better for general race questions concerning logistics and such.

2. 32" tires are probably the way to go. Look for tires that are light weight for the best handling IMO, such as the Tensor DS. I'd test with the stock clutch and see how it works before worrying about tuning it. If you can buy an entire clutch as a spare that is waaaay better than trying to fix a broken clutch. A lot of times some guy who is upgrading to a billet unobtainium clutch will sell his stocker.

3. I wasn't aware that the Wildcat didn't have a clutch fan. Get that Razorback gauge (its the only IR temp gauge I know of) and see how hot your belt runs before you make all those fan mods.

4. You don't need a windshield or any of that cooling stuff. Just a pumper and some decent helmets with a good intercom and radio. The Wildcat seems to be set up for mounting this stuff better than most UTVs. Wear a clear visor and bring a spare or two for when they get scratched. Most guys wear sunglasses underneath in the daytime. I have bought tinted safety glasses for racing that I can just throw aside if we get into night. PCI, Rugged, Palomar, etc can set you up with a good clear intercom and VHf radio. I'd leave the ham radio at home. Make sure the helmets have good modern comm kits installed....ones that are even a few years old tend to bad mics and low speaker volume.

5. You will probably need some light at least on a day or two. Overhead light bars are of limited use IMO, they just make a lot of glare. Plus the electrical system is busy running radios, pumpers, gps, etc and every electron is important. Get a couple of Baja Designs XL80s or a 20" Onyx bar for the front bumper and you should be fine.

6. No idea how the Wildcat filter is set up but I run stock paper filters on my x3 with an S/B particle separator and it stays nice and clean. I used 3 filters during the 5 day race but probably could have done the whole thing on one. I used to have a TwinAir foam filter and IMO it didn't do a good job getting all the dust and it was a nasty PITA to clean.

7. Definitely don't run a reclining seat. NRG makes a very economical tub seat that I've run in my last two race vehicles with zero issues or discomfort. Not a big fan of suspension seats but some guys love them. Most desert guys use a 5 point harness. I'd also recommend an HNR, even if its one of those cheaper Ztech units. Not only is it safer but it actually helps quite a bit with fatigue IMO. I have a padded harness for when I go out on trail rides but I also have a plain harness with 2" shoulder straps for racing with the HNR.

8. Generally there is a lot of clearance under your A-arms so I wouldn't bother with guards. My trailing arms however hung quite a bit lower and I put UHMW guards on them and I pulled the guards every night to check for cracks. These were stock trailing arms and my front lowers were chromoly.

9. You need spares. Trailing arm, A-arm, tie rod, axles, etc as well as tires and the aforementioned clutch and obviously belts. Keep an eye out of the classifieds (especially on wildcat forums) for take offs such as radiators, fans, carrier bearings, bushings, or anything else than can get damaged, seize up or wear out.

Good luck. The Wildcat that ran last year had some pretty impressive stage times. I think its a good car but obviously not a ton of races on it yet.
There's a ton of guidance here on tires, windshields, light recommendations, filters, guard feedback, etc. This is EXACTLY what I was hoping for so THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

As far as spares are concerned, yup, I'm already on it. You should see the # of spares we drag out for a $500 tbird when we go race for the weekend; I've learned from 8+ years that a surprising # of things can break that you should prepare for and that just on a road course (vs in the desert). For the Wildcat I've broken down the spares and come up with a fairly comprehensive list that covers everything you have mentioned plus a few more; the one I wasn't sure about was the clutch(es). I have both a reasonable list that totals ~$4500 MSRP and a EVERYTHING+KITCHENSINK list that totals ~$15K (probably not bring that much crap to the party).

Again, the value of running two of the same vehicle is to share the spares (outside of the tires/wheels, belts, and filter consumables). The BIL used to be in the motorcycle biz so he has some contacts w/ UTV dealers; I'm hoping we can work something out here.

Our plan is to do a shakedown runs and the BIL plans to run the Idaho rally. Your advice about setting up the temp gauge and testing first before trying to setup addtl cooling has merit. If I understand the design correctly, the clutch itself acts like a fan to draw air in across the belts.

Q: BTW. On the wildcat, there are two clutches -- the drive clutch and the driven one. Which one is the one most likely to break or is it a crapshoot that either could die?
Arctic Cat, Inc. » Parts

Thanks again for your suggestions.
-g
 

Zambo

Well-Known Member
#6
My experience is all with the x3. The drive clutch is the one that will most likely have problems. I didn't have to change mine during the race, but it did start to drag the belt toward the end, making it hard to shift in and out of gear. Another day or two and we would have had to change it or pull it apart to lube the center bearing. I had a spare drive clutch and driven clutch set that I bought from a guy for a grand.

Having an entire spare car is a good approach. Several teams down there had another UTV on a trailer that they could pull spare parts from or use as a second chase vehicle if they needed it in a tough section. However IMO you still need to have on the car a rear axle, tie rod, and other stuff to keep from getting stuck in the middle of nowhere. We came upon another x3 on the side of the trail during the race with his rear suspension all apart and he had a broken bolt (metric of course). Imagine his surprise when I pulled the exact bolt he needed out of my parts bag and handed it to him.

The x3 clutch has cooling fins on it that suck air in through a filtered inlet. I rarely, very rarely see 200 degrees on the belt. Usually closer to 150.
 
#7
Zambo:
Thanks for the comments about what we should load on the vehicle (vs just on the trailer)

You also brought up a product I wasn't aware about: the S/B particle separator. Their promo video seems very compelling but I'm still trying to understand how it works. I'm going to have to research this product further so thanks for that.


-g
 

BigBlue&Goldie

Well-Known Member
#8
These are fair points but it's not 100% my and my friends decision. If we did this alone, we'd probably lean towards renting a UTV.
However, his new BIL is set on the Wildcat XX and he brings to the party a lot more support (and quite frankly offroad experience) that we'd field alone. Also, going with his choice in vehicle allows us to share a LOT when it comes to spares. Since we now have a way to tow the vehicle from home to Baja and back, jumping on his chosen bandwagon is a viable option.
Take it from someone who has experience with that race and UTV racing; you are much better off having the same vehicle as everyone else out there (RZR or X3). I would rather have 20 other race experienced teams to fall back on for plan B if you dont have a spare part vs. your brother in law that has no race/baja experience. Nobody will have spares for a Wildcat down there, so you better be 100% confident that you have a complete spare package (hard to know what you need with zero experience). It would suck to break on day 1 of a 5 day race and have to turn around and go back to Idaho over a simple part. If you're just going to turn around and sell the UTV after the race and you have no sponsorship obligations, why not bring a proven machine with abundant support? Once again, don't take this as me being negative, as I'm trying to increase your odds of making it to Cabo. I'm also not bashing the Wildcat as I think it has a lot of great features, but from a racing perspective you're essentially your own R&D at this point.
 

Total Loss

Well-Known Member
#10
Nearly stock Wildcat XX with an RG 72" kit and stock shocks finished 4th in the NA class at the 500.
Probably would have podiumed if they did'nt lose a fuel pump- most likely an A/M one for the mandatory cell.

Also check out Shock Therapy's You tube page. They have 2 great vids.

I am most likely buying this car soon. The platform is stellar. Teething problems with the rear axles that will get sorted.
You have 10 months. There will be more TOR cars around me thinks.

 
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NIKAL

Well-Known Member
#12
I think the WildcatXX is a great choice. In another year the Wildcat will be as common as the Can Am. And if it’s not so what! And why follow the comments and run a RZR because it’s the most common? It’s also most common to catch fire and have another dozen recalls too! There are tones of weak points on the RZR that need addressing to make it durable. Heck, you can’t race a stock RZR cage, you can with the Wildcat. I think you will find much less needs to be upgraded with the WildcatXX.

The engine in the Wildcat is probably one of the best. It’s the Yamaha YZX engine, which has been very proven, and when speaking to the guys at Alba Racing they say it’s the best UTV engine & design on the market.

From what I’ve seen & read the stock parts on the WildcatXX are way more durable then what’s on the RZR or Can Am. So you will be less likely to need to carry some stock parts that the other brands need to carry in the car or stock in the Chase Truck. Also the Wildcat uses the same hub assembly on all 4 corners. The rear trailing arms are the same right to left. So that will save you from having to buy multiple parts to carry.

Zambo clearly has the most knowledge of racing NORRA & in a UTV. I would listen to his advice.

As far as clutching and a 32 inch tire. I would test the stock clutching first. The Wildcat is the only UTV to come stock with 30 inch tires and all the same size. So making the jump to 32’s might not be that big of a deal. I would carry a spare primary & secondary clutch for each car and maybe parts to rebuilt one if necessary. The WildcatXX clutching has a built in fan on the primary which pulls the air in. The secondary unit also has fins on it. I’m not sold on the blower fan, unless it has its own dedicated ducting. Those inline fans can cause more restrictions then good.

I would carry two spare cvt belts in the car, with a spare rear axle. Misc hardware and maybe a tie rod.

I would watch over the next year and see what other people are finding as weak points and what might need to be carried. I would also call Robby Gordon Motorsports and ask them for spare parts advise. They are in the WildcatXX business and it’s important for them to see success with the WildcatXX.

And regarding the rear axle & front dif issues. From what I have read, those problems stem more from production assembly and not a part or design flaw. I would suspect those issues will be fixed pretty quick. Textron contracted Team Associated to build the whole driveline system. They are the same company who built the clutch and also build the clutches for Polaris, not sure for Can Am? But they know what they are doing and will fix what issues they have.
 
#13
I think the WildcatXX is a great choice. In another year the Wildcat will be as common as the Can Am. And if it’s not so what! And why follow the comments and run a RZR because it’s the most common? It’s also most common to catch fire and have another dozen recalls too! There are tones of weak points on the RZR that need addressing to make it durable. Heck, you can’t race a stock RZR cage, you can with the Wildcat. I think you will find much less needs to be upgraded with the WildcatXX.
It's also the most common to win in Baja, KOH, or any other race for that matter. Recommending an unproven platform based on internet predictions seems kind of ridiculous. How many races has Robby already DNF'd or won for that matter........and he has 40yrs of desert racing experience and factory support. Let's be real, this guy was asking about HAM radio equipment and body cooling suits; he doesn't need to also contend with trying to figure out a spare parts package for a brand new platform. I have no skin in Polaris or CanAm, I think they are all pieces of ****, but if I was going to start out in racing it would be in a known car with hundreds of thousands of race miles.
 

scottm

Well-Known Member
#14
#15
I raced Norra in a stock utv in 2017 and had similar questions, Zambo's advise is all very good. I wanted to add a few things based on my experience.
Bringing sat phones, one for each race car and chase truck. There are some places on the course where the race cars will be well out of radio range of the chase trucks.
Have 2 gps units, our Lowrance went out on the last day and although we had the road book, it got confusing. I will always have a small handheld as a backup. As for spare parts, we brought a bunch, spare arms, axles etc. but didn't use anything. We only had 1 flat tire.
From my experience the thing to remember is don't push a stock utv like a race car, drive the rally, have fun and enjoy all the sites of Baja. It truly is the funnest race. Also book your rooms early.
 

Total Loss

Well-Known Member
#16
Speedwerx has a clutch setup for 32's.

As Pistol says, be careful with wider offset wheels. You may be able to get away with a 4/3 on a 32" with the added height. Will only change the scrub angles by a little bit and your handling should still be good.
Stock offset is 5/2

Bring spares. KISS (Keep it simple stoopid) and make it a nice fast cruise down. Don't try to break the sound barrier and you should be good.
As C Harvey stated- bring at least 2 radios. Especially if you connect to an intercom with no car speaker. You will need at least one handheld when you leave the car.
 

Nessy

Well-Known Member
#17
It's also the most common to win in Baja, KOH, or any other race for that matter. Recommending an unproven platform based on internet predictions seems kind of ridiculous. How many races has Robby already DNF'd or won for that matter........and he has 40yrs of desert racing experience and factory support. Let's be real, this guy was asking about HAM radio equipment and body cooling suits; he doesn't need to also contend with trying to figure out a spare parts package for a brand new platform. I have no skin in Polaris or CanAm, I think they are all pieces of ****, but if I was going to start out in racing it would be in a known car with hundreds of thousands of race miles.
Go look at the XX in person and watch Shock Therapys Youtube video on prerunning Baja with this car. It is far and away the best built UTV. And they race a RZR but I suspect that might change.
 
#18
Go look at the XX in person and watch Shock Therapys Youtube video on prerunning Baja with this car. It is far and away the best built UTV. And they race a RZR but I suspect that might change.
You seem to think that I'm against the XX, which is 100% not true. Like I said before, it has a ton of great features and represents a "next generation" of UTV's. The Shock Therapy video series is clearly got something behind it, it's obvious Textron has their hand in it. That video also supports why I say a RZR or X3 would be the better choice right now; blown boots and pulled out axles is kinda a problem when it comes to racing 5 days and 1000 miles. How many boots does it take to get a car 1000 miles when they only last 40 miles? Is duct tape boots the way to go? We don't know yet because there is very little real life racing R&D done at this point. Read up, axles and boots are a HUGE issue on the XX right now; it's clearly a design flaw. Hopefully they figure it out as the rest of the machine looks pretty nice. Go looks at Simms Baja 500 winning car and you will see just how surprisingly stock his is.
 

Nessy

Well-Known Member
#19
You seem to think that I'm against the XX, which is 100% not true. Like I said before, it has a ton of great features and represents a "next generation" of UTV's. The Shock Therapy video series is clearly got something behind it, it's obvious Textron has their hand in it. That video also supports why I say a RZR or X3 would be the better choice right now; blown boots and pulled out axles is kinda a problem when it comes to racing 5 days and 1000 miles. How many boots does it take to get a car 1000 miles when they only last 40 miles? Is duct tape boots the way to go? We don't know yet because there is very little real life racing R&D done at this point. Read up, axles and boots are a HUGE issue on the XX right now; it's clearly a design flaw. Hopefully they figure it out as the rest of the machine looks pretty nice. Go looks at Simms Baja 500 winning car and you will see just how surprisingly stock his is.
Surprisingly stock with all aftermarket suspension components and very expensive axles on all 4 corners that still have issues. Do you really think a cv boot issue is going to be hard to fix on cv's that run very cool? How do you know Textron is involved in the video?
 
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#20
Surprisingly stock with all aftermarket suspension components and very expensive axles on all 4 corners that still have issues. Do you really think a cv boot issue is going to be hard to fix on cv's that run very cool? How do you know Textron is involved in the video?

How competitive is any race car that has to replace CV boots every 40mi......even if they are ice cold?

Once again, the XX might be the next hot ticket in UTV racing, but that is a long ways out when they can't keep them alive on their prerun. If that prerun was a race they would not have been competitive with those problems, so it sounds like the XX needs heavy duty axles also.
 
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