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Prerunners vs. UTV's

Zambo

Well-Known Member
#21
Thanks for the feed back. Mrs. Landers has spoken! Brandon and Zambo how do you feel your UTV's compare to your prerunners performance wise? Have you noticed once you start beating on the UTV's more the prep bills are similar to a prerunner?
Way less than my prerunner truck. An entire OEM axle assembly with both CVs brand new is 180 bucks. So cheap I've never even attempted to rebuild a CV, they are disposable. And I've never broken one, although I do change them out preventatively after 2000 miles or so. Got plenty of spares laying around at this point.

Grease the wheel bearings once in a while, change the brake pads and spark plugs once a year, oil change, front and rear gearbox oil change, just general routine maintenance. Pretty simple. The stock pivot bearings seem to last a long time. You can get beefier radius rods with heims for adjustability, but you can also just sleeve the stock ends into a piece of chromoly for a pretty cheap and bombproof back end. S3 makes an inexpensive weld on gusset kit for the trailing arms and Extreme Performance makes a simple gusset kit for the front lowers. A few other gussets here and there the the car will last a long time without very much prep work or spending many thousands of dollars for aftermarket arms and such.

Of course, you can break ANY car or truck if you drive it hard enough, but for what I consider normal prerunning you should be good to go.
 

Al Swearengen

Well-Known Member
#22
This pretty much answered the question I have.. Can a UTV prerun a full peninsula Baja 1000 down and back without needing a full prep ? There is so much hwy that I'm concerned about the motor and drive train holding up to a 2500-3000 mile down and back pre run.
 

Zambo

Well-Known Member
#23
This pretty much answered the question I have.. Can a UTV prerun a full peninsula Baja 1000 down and back without needing a full prep ? There is so much hwy that I'm concerned about the motor and drive train holding up to a 2500-3000 mile down and back pre run.
First of all, Al was one of the greatest characters on TV!

Second, I remember when I first got my car, the first thing I did with it was go on the Parker pre-run. I was talking to Rob Mac at the midway lunch, and he was prerunning in a RZR. The consensus was that for most races, the UTV was just too convenient to overlook, but a peninsula run was too much for the reasons stated here. I wouldn't do it in my car without a chase trailer. The good news is that you can stack more than one of these things on a single decent sized trailer.
 

loufish

Well-Known Member
#25
The other bad part is telling your friends and family that you're gay.
Now that's funny!

My son and I are looking at the RZR 4S as a Baja fun runner...but of course set up for only 2 using the backseat for storage along with a roof rack...
 

Honda48X

Well-Known Member
#26
I’m neither Brandon or Zambo, but I can confirm my maintenance & prep on my UTV vs my Prerun Baja bug or former buggy is way less. I have yet had to prep or replace a CV on my UTV. Where I was prepping CV’s every season or before a long trip in the prerunners. I can buy a complete replacement axle & CV setup for the UTV for less then one race prepped CV cost. I don’t miss prepping CV’s!
So I have a question. Why is it that a UTV company can make a CV that according to everyone seems to last forever but everyone has to replace a CV on a Prerunner? Confused because wouldn't they be the same thing?
 

cubed

Well-Known Member
#27
Stock VWs go forever on CVs. I would bet that if you ran UTV suspension travel within a 1/4" of their life and then doubled the horsepower like just about everybody does on the buggy prerunners they would probable chew up CVs also.
 
#29
I spent 20K in maintenance on my Alumi-Craft. That was with me running the engine to that guy, the transaxle to this guy, the shocks over to this dude. Personally I like the idea of dropping it off at a dealer, getting a quote and picking it up a couple days later for like a quarter of the price I’d pay a “prep” shop or just buying the parts at my local dealer and doing it myself. This is also why I have a Ford Raptor. It ain’t linked but it’s fun and the dealer the warranty and Baja HQ takes great care of it.

You guys know the saying right? It’s more fun to drive a slow car fast than a fast car slow.
Why do you think the asphalt guys that do track days love miatas so much?
 
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1wayne

Well-Known Member
#30
The main drawback is that UTVs have small fuel tanks and don't go as far as a bigger traditional pre-runner. This can be a headache but there's solutions. The can am has a secondary or bigger replacement tank available. it goes where the pass side dash is. The prep is easier. Spares are lighter. Lotsa stock parts on these that actually last. You can use a smaller, lighter duty tow vehicle and a lighter trailer. The 4wd UTV is handy to be able to cruise and explore lines that may be questionable in a longer heavier 2wd. A trade off is that if you only pre-run in the UTV and then go race a big truck you have to adapt on race day to the new speeds/ride height/etc. The other bad part is telling your friends and family that you're gay.
Nothing wrong with being gay except for the sex!
 

Fourstroker

Well-Known Member
#33
I would say yes. I just did 1400 miles to Cabo a couple of weeks ago with no issues. I would have no problem doing it again with little to no prep.
Even more impressive with the heaviest tires of the bunch. Did you do any clutch work before your trip?
 
#34
Most pre runners that are not UTV get in the way of UTVs. We pre run our Polaris all over and hi dollar cars in a lot of cases cant or wont run a pace a good UTV can
 

TRAVISD

Well-Known Member
#36
Even more impressive with the heaviest tires of the bunch. Did you do any clutch work before your trip?

Zero clutch work. Original belt with 2000 miles on it now. Ran 90 across Diablo, no problem climbing and getting around. The only upgrades I did do was the gussent kits, Shock tower brace and bulk head all on the front end. Plus SDG re-worked the shocks.
 
#37
I took the back seats out of my 4 seat Polaris and mounted a 15 gallon fuel cell that I use as a transfer tank with a facet fuel pump it works terrific
 

McCredie A

Well-Known Member
#38
I have a can am 2 seater and found a fuel cell in australia that goes under the seats so now I have 27 gallons on board,no more roto paks for me.I changed the springs before I picked up the can am and it works great.
Would you mind posting a link to where you purchased the fuel cell?
 

McCredie A

Well-Known Member
#39
Zero clutch work. Original belt with 2000 miles on it now. Ran 90 across Diablo, no problem climbing and getting around. The only upgrades I did do was the gussent kits, Shock tower brace and bulk head all on the front end. Plus SDG re-worked the shocks.
Did you drive your car before having the shocks tuned? What is your thoughts on the car after getting the shocks tuned?
 

TRAVISD

Well-Known Member
#40
Did you drive your car before having the shocks tuned? What is your thoughts on the car after getting the shocks tuned?

Yes, I did the “Fox” tune and for average trail and desert running it is fine. Biggest issue is the stock springs sag quickly. The SDG setup with new springs and there work inside is just that much better. Better ride quality at all speeds, for me definitely worth the investment.
 
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