PROBLEMAS DE AGUA

Tube ride

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michael.gonzalez

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The Wall works where it exists. Typical Liberal response- Folks like you ended the programs that actually worked to solve problems because if the problem gets solved, you can't use it to politic on.
Clearly super effective here in California! Right @joshmx88 ?
 

joshmx88

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I agree with that to a degree, the border situation in this part of the world is less than ideal. I have not walked the border in our area to see how much of a wall actually exists there but from what I have seen in that area is no wall, some pieces of fence, and the landscape. So I would say that no wall is not working well. I think if there was an actual wall in that area it would help with the influx of migrants. There is little to no deterrent to stay there with wide open lands. What do you think?
 

TwistyItch

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I think the California almond industry is ridiculous. It is California's largest crop. It takes 1 gallon of water for ONE almond. California grows 1.59 BILLION almonds a year according to UC Davis Study in 2009. This grew to 2.27 billion almonds in 2017 according to Wikipedia

The 2009 UC Davis article states there are 6000 California growers. There were 6800 growers in 2016 according to Almond Board of Growers

Using 2016 numbers, 2.27 billion of gallons (actually conservative estimate) of gallons are used by 6800 farmers each year. And depending on how you feel about almonds, I have to ask is that worth it at the expense of so many more industries and citizens?

According to this 2015 article by the Almond Growers almonds are 8.75% of irrigated ag lands (<4%). 2.27 billion gallons for <4% of irrigated lands because of almonds. And of all the water used for agriculture fruits and nuts account for 34% of the use. I can't find the data but suspect most of that water use is for almonds given how thirsty that crop is.

CA agriculture uses 80% of California's water according to the Washington Post in 2015. I have seen the search results that claim 40% is agricultural use, so I am not sure who to believe. Regardless almonds use most of that in a one to one comparison. It doesn't take a gallon of water to produce 2 grams of lettuce, tomatoes, etc.

80% of the worlds almonds come from California. But I could do without almonds personally.
Here is other link providing interesting (to me) facts on this.
A 2020 article

TL;DR...F* almonds
Conserve water - use LiquidAider (now I'm making things up).
 

michael.gonzalez

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TL;DR...F* almonds
Conserve water - use LiquidAider (now I'm making things up).

Wait until you find out how much water it takes to make a steak or a carne asada taco! :cool: 👍
I trust you will have the same "F* almonds" attitude.... right?
 

michael.gonzalez

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View attachment 227899

The Resniiks who own wonderful co.
Thank you Resniiks!

thank you for all the employment

thank you for the US-made goods

and MOST OF ALL, THANK YOU FOR ALL THE TRICKLE DOWN!!!!!!!!!!!!

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"So GOD made a farmer"


It's not like we need food, right?! ;)
 

ltr450rider

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The agriculture industry in CA (and other South Western states) is something that I get pretty annoyed at whenever I am driving through them.

We have all obviously been through the desert a time or two, anyone ever look around at some of the farms that are growing some pretty green fields in the middle of summer in the desert? Then maybe get a little annoyed when talk of water rationing starts popping up for us who simply live here? (which is coming again very soon).

There is absolutely no reason to grow crops in an arid region that require a larger amount of irrigation than what is available in local water supply to sustain said crops. (Other than money of course). I get that we have a very fertile growing region in the CA Central Valley. As much as I hate limiting freedoms of anyone to do as they please (within reason), there needs to be some common sense approaches to what is allowed to grow based on how much water is takes to do so. Maybe we need to plant some common sense and feed it to our politicians, probably couldn't grow enough of it to do any good at this point.

The state of CA is quite literally bleeding itself dry (of water) to sustain an unsustainable crop that otherwise would never grow on its own in that region. But money talks, and almonds are a cash crop. (There is season of Goliath on Amazon that takes a dramatic plunge into the CA almond grower industry which is pretty over the top, but hits on some points that are actually occurring)
 

TwistyItch

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Wait until you find out how much water it takes to make a steak or a carne asada taco! :cool: 👍
I trust you will have the same "F* almonds" attitude.... right?
Hi Mike I did not think to compare and contrast because there is no comparison. But that is a pretty good concern to many. Actually my family are cattle ranchers down in the SE desert of NM. But checking in with Brad Buchanan owner of Flying B-Bar Ranch, largest grass fed cattle cattle ranch here in Colorado, and a close friend, it takes 20 gallons in summer here east of Denver a day for grass fed and maybe half that in the rest of the year. According to a study published by ERIC - Defending Beef claims 8 - 20 gallons and totals 122 gallons for a pound of beef (they have the breakdown of hanging weight, etc. which I think is accurate in yield numbers). Let's call it 200 gallons for a pound of grass fed beef to add generous margin for error.

Regardless it takes 400 - 500 gallons for a pound of Almonds.

I have seen and anyone can go look at the Vegan calculations, but here is a great study that explains how at least one vegan study came to such a wild estimate of 20,000 liters for one kg of beef. Below is another link explaining great numbers (inaccurate numbers) used by anti-beef people.

Link, link, link

Regardless, yes beef uses a fair amount of water. I only intend to say we should look at how we use the water, not just focus on how to get more, and not just focus on how to make citizens use less. Mother Jones has an article stating that Almonds in one year uses 3x the amount of water that LA does. I have no idea if that is accurate but that is the sort of point I wanted to make. It seems disproportionate to me.

BTW, link to best grass fed beef I've ever had.
 
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ltr450rider

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That sounds like regulation.....
Without some regulation, you end up with:
  • Unsafe passes on 2 lane highways that run oncoming traffic off the road.
  • Spectators setting up camp within a few feet of hot race courses.
  • Racers running over/damaging spectator camps and personal property to maintain track position/time.
Don't ask me where I pulled those bullet points from, just came to me out of the blue.
 

Bricoop

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More than just Almonds. Other nuts and even things like alfalfa are major consumers of H20. Alfalfa is then put on a boat and shipped out of the country, which drives up the our food costs as Alfalfa is a major feed product.

With the amount of goods we import, ships heading east transport goods for a fraction of the price. It's almost half the cost to put it on a slow boat to China than to ship it from socal to the central valley.
 
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