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Psi for air bumps????

rdc

- users no longer part of the rdc family -
#1
I have never messed with air bumps and was wondering what is the nitrogen pressure to run in them. I have 2" by 4" stroke stops. I assume that they are like air shocks and the air pressure affects the spring rate. Is this correct?

Tony
 

Bomber52

Well-Known Member
#2
Tigger

You are correct in thinking that the gas pressure alters the spring rate of the bump stop, but you must remeber, that these units usually have shim packs inside to assist in slowing the suspension down, and they do finally hydraulic lock, to avoid the harsh metal to metal contact.

I would suggest running the gas pressures at 14 bar or 200 psi.

When in doubt, it is always best to contact the manufacturer direct.

Glenn
 

rdc

- users no longer part of the rdc family -
#3
Is that correct? Only 200 psi???? That seems low to me but I have no clue. I will call Bilstien and find out what they recommend. I just posted here thinking others might want to know... I would like to hear more from the people who run them and what psi has worked for them and for what application they are using the bumps for.

Tony
 

Mike_HKmtrsprts

Well-Known Member
#4
I run the ones in my sandrail at 300psi I have heard of some people running 350psi...

You must be Fast cuz I was HAULIN ASS when I passed you...
 

JasonHutter

Well-Known Member
#5
We run SAW air bumps, and we charge them to 200psi, per SAW. It gives the truck a real nice ride, and when racing I want to know when I am really pounding the truck. At this psi with the triple bypasses, if we are bottoming the truck, we need to slow down to save the truck for the rest of the race. I would suppose if you were out at the jumps for an IP meeting I would charge them a little higher for the one time hit. I suppose it just depends on the application. Our Toyota doesn't weigh a hole lot either. We need to be 3000#s for 7s and we have brought it real close to that weight. I agree with Tigger, I would call the manufacturer of which ever bumps you are using and tell them your application and see what they say.

Later,
Jason
 
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