Pulsed MIG Welding

Brian Mc

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I am not sure if there is a thred on this yet, sorry if there is. Is pulsed mig welding a worth while option for better looking mig welds, and a cleaner product when done? I am looking for a faster and better way. I will be welding cromo and mild steel as well as aluminum.

Another note, I am looking at the Millermatic 350 with the aluminum push-pull gun.
 
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Lance

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I've had good luck with pulsed mig welding. you just have to make sure you turn the heat up more then you would with a continuous bead and turn the speed down just a tick. I don't know about aluminum mig welding because I've never done it but it sure does the trick for steel.

its not faster then a continuous bead but looks way better if done right
 

matt_helton

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ive heard many a wise man say........."if you cant hold the trigger from start to finish then you need to go back and learn to weld."
 

BajaFand

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I really don't mean to offend but I have to go with Helton on this one, pulsed mig=cheating. First off it is definately not faster, in fact it is much slower. Keep practicing your continuous beads and you will be a much better welder than those that don't.

We have a 350p at our shop with the Python push/pull gun. It works good for aluminum but that is all we use it for, for steel we use a 252. You will not but able to pulse weld aluminum as aluminum wire is too soft for constant starting and stopping and it will get bound up constantly. This also happens when you stick the tip, the wire gets bound up and you have to go back to the spool and cut the wire and pull it all out and then reroute the wire back through the push/pull gun, this usually takes around 10 minutes each time it happens. It's not like steel wire that you can just pull it out with pliers and keep welding.

If you get a 350p I can tell you from experience you will have fun dialing it in, it is the most complicated welder we have ever used. It does work great for AL though.
 

ZTFab

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x3 on the pulsed. Weld continuously.

"Pulse" welding in short circuit transfer by manipulating the trigger can cause problems. Especially since it can be easy to make it "look good" it can hide a lot of underlying issues.
 

Brian Mc

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Thanks for the info to just stay away from the pulsed welders!
I am inquiring about a welding class right now. The welder I have now is the Thermal arc 210 I just need to learn how to use the controls better I guess.

There are just not to many guys close to me that have the advanced welding skills.

Thanks again Brian
 

ErikShallbetter

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Hey guys, I'm not sure if this was misunderstood, or if I'm misunderstanding but...

I don't believe he is asking about pulsed mig welding as in "trigger" welding. But in a "pulsed" mig machine.

From lincolns site:

"What is Pulsed MIG?
In simple terms, pulsed MIG is a non-contact transfer method between the electrode and the weld puddle. This means that at no time does the electrode ever touch the puddle. This is accomplished through high-speed manipulation of the electrical output of the welding machine. It is designed to be a spatterless process that will run at a lower heat input than spray or globular transfer methods.

The pulsed MIG process works by forming one droplet of molten metal at the end of the electrode per pulse. Then, just the right amount of current is added to push that one droplet across the arc and into the puddle. The transfer of these droplets occurs through the arc, one droplet per pulse."



http://www.lincolnelectric.com/knowledge/articles/content/pulsedmig.asp

I have heard really good things about them.

(note: not my welding in the pic)
 

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sickrick

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Trigger weld / Booger Tig.

No Bueno!
 

43mod

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maybe i am wrong but the miller pulse welder is a different type of mig welding.not a stop and start stitch deal.we have 2 in our shop and it is a much metter weld than a standard mig.
 

Brian Mc

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The welder is a Millermatic 350P and is used for welding steel and alum. I just do not want to short change myself by cheating on the welding prosess. I have been welding for 23 years but only arc and simple mig welding. I started mig with a hobart 120 and now have a thermal arc 210.
 

BajaFand

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Like I said before, the 350p is a good welder, it is just a serious PIA to figure out how to use. The machine has so many different settings and it is very difficult to work with. So far we have it dialed in for a single type of AL welding that we do and that is all we care to set it up for because we have two other machines in the shop to use for steel and misc. stuff.

If you have not gotten the machine yet, I am just trying to caution you about getting a very expensive machine that you may regret because it is so complicated to use.

If you are looking for a machine to use only for AL there are other machines made especially for AL, but I can't remember the name of the one I am thinking of. It's an older machine that I don't believe they make anymore, I will do some research and find it.
 

tomahawkracefab

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ive heard many a wise man say........."if you cant hold the trigger from start to finish then you need to go back and learn to weld."

I dont agree with that...with mig it's all too easy to have a 'cold' start and a 'hot' finish to the weld...the better welding machines have 3 trigger steps for amps , pull trigger=hotter, release=medium amps, then pull trigger again for a lower amp setting to finish weld

Hey guys, I'm not sure if this was misunderstood, or if I'm misunderstanding but...

I don't believe he is asking about pulsed mig welding as in "trigger" welding. But in a "pulsed" mig machine.

From lincolns site:

"What is Pulsed MIG?
In simple terms, pulsed MIG is a non-contact transfer method between the electrode and the weld puddle. This means that at no time does the electrode ever touch the puddle. This is accomplished through high-speed manipulation of the electrical output of the welding machine. It is designed to be a spatterless process that will run at a lower heat input than spray or globular transfer methods.

The pulsed MIG process works by forming one droplet of molten metal at the end of the electrode per pulse. Then, just the right amount of current is added to push that one droplet across the arc and into the puddle. The transfer of these droplets occurs through the arc, one droplet per pulse."

your right about the pulse mig Eric , anyone that thinks pulse-mig is not a correct process would change thier mind if they knew how to use a machine with adjustable pulse frequency, my fronius welder has the same principal , pulsed mig with trigger held on = no spatter , no ball left on the end of wire, far better control of heat and feed rate and can peel of tig-like welds on ally and stainless...you can pick a pulse mig when its running, a loud buzzing noise depending on the frequency of pulse your running , and you dont have to wave the torch around the puddle like a fairy with a wand....Brian , go with the pulse mig , then take your time to hone your skills with the machine
 

tomahawkracefab

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some pics of 'pulse mig' ( low freqeuncy ) on a kenworth chassis extension, 5/16 thick chassis rail, one pass on each side @ 300 amps, a sample was tested to relevant standards and approved for road use (registration/insurance purposes) and a pic of of some stainless exhaust tube with high frequency pulse..there's actualy two pulses going on...the frequency of molten droplets ( feed material ) and a frequency of high / low amperage
 

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BajaFand

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I dont agree with that...with mig it's all too easy to have a 'cold' start and a 'hot' finish to the weld...the better welding machines have 3 trigger steps for amps , pull trigger=hotter, release=medium amps, then pull trigger again for a lower amp setting to finish weld



your right about the pulse mig Eric , anyone that thinks pulse-mig is not a correct process would change thier mind if they knew how to use a machine with adjustable pulse frequency, my fronius welder has the same principal , pulsed mig with trigger held on = no spatter , no ball left on the end of wire, far better control of heat and feed rate and can peel of tig-like welds on ally and stainless...you can pick a pulse mig when its running, a loud buzzing noise depending on the frequency of pulse your running , and you dont have to wave the torch around the puddle like a fairy with a wand....Brian , go with the pulse mig , then take your time to hone your skills with the machine

You may be correct, but you aren't catching the point of this thread due to the terminology. What we have been shunning is better referred to as "trigger" welding. Just to clear things up. :D
 

tomahawkracefab

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You may be correct, but you aren't catching the point of this thread due to the terminology. What we have been shunning is better referred to as "trigger" welding. Just to clear things up. :D

10-4 on that one! just tryin to explain to Brian the advantages i've seen with my pulse welders, to help him with his machine purchase / tuition....i think some on here dont know there's a difference between pulse and trigger?...good luck with the welder upgrade Mightyjeep, keep us posted with what ya get...
 
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