Race Suits ......New rules ???

Bajabell

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Can anyone confirm if SCORE has changed the Fire Suit Rules ???
Do the cloth helmet dust surrounds also have to be fireproof ???

We have been told that TWO layers of fire protection is now mandatory ....... IS THIS CORRECT ???
I have heard that single layer suits are no longer good enough unless you have fire proof underwear which then counts as the second layer.

A two layer suit with underwear sound like the safe way to go.
 

retroblazer

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Check score’s website. A two layer suit with fire resistant under wear should be a minimum. It is “safer”, but a small reminder that there is no such word as “safe” in racing.


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Bajabell

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CR 2 PROTECTIVE CLOTHING

Four-wheel Vehicles
Driving suits certified to SFI 3.2A/5 are required to effectively cover the body from the neck to the ankles and wrist. Driving Suits certified to SFI 3.2A/1 or 3.2A/2 may only be worn with a complete layer of underwear certified

to SFI 3.3.

ONE PIECE DRIVING SUITS ARE MANDATORY. Drivers suits must be in good condition and free of damage (i.e. holes, tears, rips, etc.) Driving gloves are recommended and must be made of leather and/or other fire- resistant material containing no holes.

A 2" high by 4" long area on the upper left chest area of the driving suit must remain open for SCORE's use. SCORE will designate at the start of each new season what patches will be placed in this area.
 

retroblazer

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There is no rule covering helmet skirts currently. (Not to worry, the safety equipment pushers will want some FIA standard to be applied)Also note that the same standard for a driver now applies to your refueler as well.


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Chris Tobin

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Can anyone confirm if SCORE has changed the Fire Suit Rules ???
Do the cloth helmet dust surrounds also have to be fireproof ???

We have been told that TWO layers of fire protection is now mandatory ....... IS THIS CORRECT ???
I have heard that single layer suits are no longer good enough unless you have fire proof underwear which then counts as the second layer.

A two layer suit with underwear sound like the safe way to go.
If you are needing a new suit in time for the 1000 check out www.racesuitrental.com, they have nice quality gear at a VERY good price!!! My son and I are renting our gear from them...
 

Oscar Cardona

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Hello, I have a single layer 1 piece Crown suit thIS suits are SFI 3.3/1 approved and wanted to race sf250 this year. are this suit legal???
thanks in advanced
 

TROPHYSEDAN

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Best in the desert you needed a 2 layer suit for years.
 

Big Whitey

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We wear a one layer suit with nomex underwear at SCORE/BITD
I thought BITD required the two layer SFI cert suits. I agree with the fire rated panty sets under a single layer suit equals same and or better and should be acceptable.
 

mxben

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I thought BITD required the two layer SFI cert suits. I agree with the fire rated panty sets under a single layer suit equals same and or better and should be acceptable.

It is a thick single layer that carries the same rating as a two later. Sparco Victory.
 

UPR Racing

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SFI 3.2a/5 can be 1, 2 or 3 layer...it’s about the rating not the layers.

I don’t think there’s a 3.2a/2 Rating as listed in the rule book, not sure what that’s about. 3.2a/3 is a rating, but we’ve never run across it.

The SFI 3.2a/1 is typically a single layer suit which people buy with the illusion that they are cooler and cheaper than a multi-layer suit. An SFI 3.2a/1 rated single layer suit can cost between 120.00 and 250.00 from what we’ve seen, ours are from 120.00 to 150. We don’t sell more expensive SFI 3.2a/1 single layer suits because we don’t feel they are good value beyond our price points.

What’s the difference in SFI 3.2a/1 suits? The main difference is the material and country of origin; the suits that are closer to a 100 are likely chemically treated cotton that makes them fire resistant. The upside is they are cheap and will get you through tech, the downside is the treatment seals the material to the point they don’t breathe and the treatment will wash out over time. The more expensive single layer suits could be made from real Fire Retardant Fabric (FPF) which will breathe better and don't lose protection after washing. The minimum protection requirement for a SFI 3.2a/1 suit is 3 seconds(TPP Rating, explained below) before you get a second degree burn…not much time to escape an off road car laying on its roof or side with zip-tied window nets.

I’m not sure why single layer suits are allowed at all, there’s no way to test their effectiveness as it changes with washing.

The SFI 3.2a/5 rated suits are usually 2 or 3 layer, but some of the higher end suits from Sparco and others can be single layer using their proprietary fabrics. Keep in mind that they all have to meet the same minimum requirement associated with the SFI spec. What that means is an SFI 3.2a/5 suit is required to give you 10 seconds before a second degree burn. That said, some exceed the requirement and some will barely pass…but still pass. How can you tell which one exceeds the minimum and which barely passes? Like many things you buy, use advice from a trusted professional combined with common sense. There are lots of good suppliers out there, but there are fortunately many that are just selling “parts” and not safety. Now the infomercial part- We’ve (UPR Division) been in business since 1984, our company has been around since 1960. UPR has always focused on supplying quality safety equipment brands to our customers and most importantly quality advice.

You can buy SFI 3.2s/5 quality entry level Sparco, Alpinestars or RaceQuip racing suits from UPR from 299 to 399. The name brand suits at the lower price points will likely be 2 layer of a thicker material to qualify for the SFI 3.2a/5 rating. If you get into the 500-1000+ price range, you will start to see fabrics that will meet the SFI rating with few layers which makes them lighter weight.

Under-Layers give you one more layer of protection, and a single layer can add up to 6 seconds of protection. A misconception about fire retardant under-layers is that they too hot, the reality is the better brands now breathe way better than the sweaty cotton shirt you’re probably wearing. Approved Under-layers have an SFI 3.3

Thermal Protective Performance (TPP) in the presence of both direct flame and radiant heat. The purpose of the TPP is to measure the length of time the person wearing the garment can be exposed to a heat source before incurring a second degree, or skin blistering, burn.

The TPP rating is the product of exposure heat flux and exposure time. The TPP results can be converted to the time before a second degree burn occurs. The higher the garment rating, the more time before a second degree burn. Here are the SFI ratings with the corresponding TPP values and times to a second degree burn:
 

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UPR Racing

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Hello, I have a single layer 1 piece Crown suit thIS suits are SFI 3.3/1 approved and wanted to race sf250 this year. are this suit legal???
thanks in advanced

Thats not an SFI Spec Oscar, so if the tag says that its not legal. If you're trying to say 3.2a/1, then its legal with approved under-layers that carry the SFI raying of 3.3. Post a picture of the tag if its easier.
 

One-Eyed Peter

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For the life of me, I don't understand why anyone skimps on fire protection. I know I'm stating the obvious, but getting burned is one of the worst things that can happen to you. For minimal cost, you can get significantly more fire protection. To me there isn't much if any difference in being "too hot" between a two-layer with underwear and a single-layer with underwear. Suck it up. Hydrate. Same goes for balaclava or no balaclava. Nomex helmet skirt vs. plain cotton or whatever. No gloves or mechanics gloves instead of nomex also makes no sense to me. Can't believe the rules allow that. Not just for yourself, but imagine trying to help your other driver out in the event of a fire. Or even a fellow competitor you're trying to render aid to. You can't do much with bare hands vs. 2000 degree heat. Flame away. (Pun intended).
 

y2kbaja

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UPR, thoughts on suits truck vs buggy? Trucks, engine up front, coolant, lots of oil & trans lines. Buggy, engine in the back, maybe oil cooler, maybe power steering.
 

UPR Racing

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For the life of me, I don't understand why anyone skimps on fire protection. I know I'm stating the obvious, but getting burned is one of the worst things that can happen to you. For minimal cost, you can get significantly more fire protection. To me there isn't much if any difference in being "too hot" between a two-layer with underwear and a single-layer with underwear. Suck it up. Hydrate. Same goes for balaclava or no balaclava. Nomex helmet skirt vs. plain cotton or whatever. No gloves or mechanics gloves instead of nomex also makes no sense to me. Can't believe the rules allow that. Not just for yourself, but imagine trying to help your other driver out in the event of a fire. Or even a fellow competitor you're trying to render aid to. You can't do much with bare hands vs. 2000 degree heat. Flame away. (Pun intended).
I think when people have the correct information, they make better decisions. If just search the net looking for a "racing suit" the information isn't necessarily sorted by the best information relative to what you're needs are. If you call UPR or other qualified safety equipment specialists, you will probably get someone that understand your needs for whatever you're racing as well as the rules for most sanctioning bodies. Safety equipment isn't like buying most parts, rules apply and bad decisions can hurt you.

UPR, thoughts on suits truck vs buggy? Trucks, engine up front, coolant, lots of oil & trans lines. Buggy, engine in the back, maybe oil cooler, maybe power steering.
Great question, in drag racing the higher rated suits and shoes are designed for more extreme temperatures and the potential for flammable fluids to spread during an impact which you could wear in an off road car...but it they are super heavy and limit movement which would be tough in an off road car. The best thing to do is pay attention to the potential problems and address them before the crash. Power Steering lines and transmission lines can be covered so if they burst, the fluid is captured in an out layer. I've seen them sealed with drains for a more controlled releases. Fuel Cells should be FIA rated with a flexible bladder so they deform under impact without cracking like injection molded pieces in aluminum that are common.

Oil pressure cut off switch to cut power when oil pressure is lost. There's nothing worse than a fuel pump running with a broken fuel line feeding a fire.
 

Charlietuna

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For the life of me, I don't understand why anyone skimps on fire protection. I know I'm stating the obvious, but getting burned is one of the worst things that can happen to you. For minimal cost, you can get significantly more fire protection. To me there isn't much if any difference in being "too hot" between a two-layer with underwear and a single-layer with underwear. Suck it up. Hydrate. Same goes for balaclava or no balaclava. Nomex helmet skirt vs. plain cotton or whatever. No gloves or mechanics gloves instead of nomex also makes no sense to me. Can't believe the rules allow that. Not just for yourself, but imagine trying to help your other driver out in the event of a fire. Or even a fellow competitor you're trying to render aid to. You can't do much with bare hands vs. 2000 degree heat. Flame away. (Pun intended).

I'm somewhat surprised that there are helmet skirts that AREN'T fire retardant/resistant....What the hell are you wearing it for if it's not?
 

Bro_Gill

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All good stuff Jeff. I would like to again point out like you did that the amount of layers isn't what you are looking at, it is the rating. The rating determines 'burn through time'- The time the suit will prevent 2nd degree burns at a rated temperature. What everyone should know is this- Fluid on the suit really make the rating worthless. The reason is, with exception for certain styles of suits that have a built in vapor barrier, the thermal dynamics of burning liquid or heated water vapor render most suit material unable to prevent the heat transfer that occurs. As far as material used, I have found that the dynamic action seen by off road racers is much harder on suit material then most other forms of racing. There is a lot more abrasion, much more hard scrabble materials affecting the suit while racing, and other activities like digging or changing tires that other racing endeavors do not see. The suits just don't last that long if used on a regular basis. Of course materials play a big part in this and Jeff will have an answer about whether any of the racing suppliers are offering suits in kevlar hybrid fire resistant fabrics like they offer in fire fighting. I haven't seen any but haven't looked. But I think most folks should look at desert racing suits as a replaceable item, like every couple years just because of the abuse the suits take from regular desert racing situations. We have a similar issue with wildland fire fighting gear, it wears and gets thin and the rating becomes worthless once the material begins to degrade.
 

crafty

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I understand replacing a suit when they become damaged or full of grease/fluids but is there an actual expiration date on SFI rated gear?
 
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