Racing or joy riding

E.Hagle

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We ran out of fuel at the 250 around 10 miles from our fuel stop. I said a lot of four letter words, wanted to quit, spent four hours in the desert waiting for fuel and basically decided that we were done and finishing didn't matter. My brother was in his race suit ready to go when they showed up and said " we didn't pre run for a week and risk our asses for this many miles to not finish the race" I was impressed with his attitude and now I feel dumb about mine. We finished 10th and will not start last at the 500 because of it. I felt like we should have been in the top 3 with the speed we had through the first half of the race.

Our first baja 1000 was tough. It was our first car race in mexico. We got stuck twice, fully out of the car both driver and co rider. We pushed on. Ethan got in and learned how tough it is to drive SF at night and basically that whole section solo. I had roached the clutch, pissed all over the seat, the car looked like a silt bomb had gone off in it. He came into one pit and said he was so jacked from the rough and worried about the car making it up molina incline that he was considering stopping the race. We bled the clutch, got him some food, looked him in the eye and said haul ass and make it up that hill or die trying. We hit every VCP, no speed penalties, and we ended up on the PODIUM with a 3rd in class 10. That was a win for us.

Each race the goal post is moved. Go to win, adjust expectations with the scenario you are dealt.


Biggest take away. Be grateful you are there in the first place. Don't bitch ( I am still learning this ).

We celebrated at the podium in San Felipe, briefly, and left there knowing we left a better finish on the table with a stupid mistake. I learned a lot that day from my little bro.

Love you too
 

EMS702

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I cover Pit 1 at most races. Nothing breaks my heart more than to see a ton of effort to get to a race, end at mile 50. I have seen many teams work like hell to get fixed and make the pit 1 cutoff time. Knowing full well they will not win. Some are in the points race and just a finish makes them win the class that season.
 

Tom_Willis

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I watched a LOT of racers cross the finish line at SCORE. Saw a lot of different emotions from the racers & teams... from elation to exhaustion and even some tears. Only once did I see a guy act underwhelmed, and that was a Baja Touring Car guy who had done the "arrive and drive " thing. He just wrote a check to be a part of the 1000 and had no tangible investment. IIRC, he said something like "well, there went $50,000".
 

J Prich

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In fairness to the OP he did say that he felt like he was probably in the minority regarding his opinion and the responses here seem to reflect that. I get the mindset that for some folks winning is the only thing that matters but it looks like a lot of people also really value the journey regardless of outcome. All things being equal I think everyone wants to win and even teams that know they aren't super competitive still hold out hope that things will go their way for the "perfect" day. But I'm happy to see that for many this is still obviously a "hobby" sport at the end of the day that many enjoy getting to share with friends and family, win or lose.
 

E.Hagle

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Finishing is great, but it’s not a win. Even a win with less than 5 people in the class in my mind doesn’t seem like much of a win, but nonetheless it was still an adventure and an achievement (Baja 1000). I’m probably biased because my dad two Baja 1000 wins and when I hop in the drivers seat I’m not only there soaking up the experience but I’m there to prove a point. As well as I want to be a guy who other people call to fill an empty drivers seat when they need fast and reliable. Baja racing is such an untouchable sport I still can’t believe I somehow wound up typing out this response at 28 years old. On the death bed it won’t be the trophies that are remembered, it will be the celebrations with your family and close calls cheating death with your corider.
 

Mechlectic

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2nd place is 1st loser.
Just slightly better than third.
 

MTPyle

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If we got a podium we would be celebrating like it was a 1st place. Even a top 5 for us would be huge. So it’s not all about winning for every team.

It’s like on Drive to Survive Netflix show. The middle to back pack teams celebrate finishing above their normal spot or above expectations. It’s a win for them.

if I saw a team really celebrating any finish I would be supportive and give them a cheer. You never know what it took.

for me I am more excited about an under dog doing well than a guy that always wins. You won’t see me run to the finish line to see Bryce win but I went out of my way to be there when Kyle finished his EV at KOH.

Mike
 

Israel Moore

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I guess it's a matter of having fun at the end of the day. We all love winning, but I feel like the adrenaline rush gives us enough satisfaction that we get to experience in every race.
 

HartLessPerf

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Our team is about the journey, not necessarily the outcome - and it shows by the continued growth of friends and family who come to races to support even though I'm 0 for 6 in terms of finishing. I'm not saying that my goal is to just be there and participate - I definitely agree with the mentality of "why show up to race if you're not aiming for first", and at the start line my mind is on pushing as hard as I can when approriate like I'm in a competitive car. My car on the other hand has different thoughts on that haha. We've dusted an engine, transmission, axle housing, multiple fuel issues and driven the wheels/steering off the car. This is due to used parts and inexperience (with a limited budget and being in Canada I have to learn everything and put it into effect myself, including engine tuning, shock tuning, chassis design/fabrication, etc, and we all know those things don't come over night to anyone).

Sure it's been a struggle, but it's going to be that much sweeter when we cross the line and get this monkey off our backs. Now only if Canada would let us race instead of continuing to cancel our events...
 

Old Truck Guy

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I see people celebrating after just finishing a race. Not anywhere near competitive for the class. And they are super excited with just a finish. How does everyone feel about that? I feel if I am not competitive I don't care that I just finished. I feel that I am in the minority in this issues. How does everyone feel about this topic?
I was involved in a couple of start up/grass roots racing efforts in the early to mid '80's. Not to finish was considered a failure and huge disappointment. I remember we finished 4th in 5-1600 our first time out. You'd think we won overall by all the celebrating going on! I was also involved with a "bucket list" racing effort where the proprietor was stoked just to be there and run as long as his shabby challenger car would take him.
 

43mod

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Winning the B main from the rear and second place in the main sucked balls . Finishing at i dont remember the place at Yerrington in a 7s had me doing donuts . Finishing the B1k was amazing , finding out we won our class was almost an after thought .
to each his own .
 
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