Racingtrax for V2R Bikes

misterktm

Well-Known Member
We caught a bike...for the first time ever! The only bikes we've caught in the past are broken ones sitting on the side of the course. But this guy was still moving. That poor guy was having a LONG day when he gets caught by a Jeepspeed. And we caught him just before race mile 300! I'm guessing he timed out.....Anyhow, we were so shocked to see a bike that we forgot to push the pass button. He was well aware of us coming though, he saw us probably 100 yards before we were on him and he moved over to the side. We joked about that for a while...'he must have been riding on two flat tires from the start to get caught by us...' lol. I suspect they had some sort of mechanical issue in reality, perhaps even a hurt rider and by the time they got the bike back to a teamate to continue they were that for down or something....Wish I would have paid attention to the number to see if they finished.
 

ndvalium

Rescue Director
We caught a bike...for the first time ever! The only bikes we've caught in the past are broken ones sitting on the side of the course. But this guy was still moving. That poor guy was having a LONG day when he gets caught by a Jeepspeed. And we caught him just before race mile 300! I'm guessing he timed out.....Anyhow, we were so shocked to see a bike that we forgot to push the pass button. He was well aware of us coming though, he saw us probably 100 yards before we were on him and he moved over to the side. We joked about that for a while...'he must have been riding on two flat tires from the start to get caught by us...' lol. I suspect they had some sort of mechanical issue in reality, perhaps even a hurt rider and by the time they got the bike back to a teamate to continue they were that for down or something....Wish I would have paid attention to the number to see if they finished.
I am betting it was the 362 bike. They ran out of gas 4 miles from the Tonopah Pit 5. I picked up the rider and as I arrived in the pit with him, I got word of a rider down at 171 with a broken back. I went to that, drove the course all the way to 185 after getting him flown out and went back to the pit 5 and they were still looking for someone to get fuel in the bike so I took them back out there- easily an hour / 90 minutes later. Just as they got gas in it, Rob Mac was about a mile behind leading the train at that point so I told them to park it until all the big cars cleared and it was safer to get out there. They finished the race in just under 19 hours - 4 hours later than the spot in front of them but they finished!
 

cynicwanderer

Well-Known Member
We caught a bike...for the first time ever! The only bikes we've caught in the past are broken ones sitting on the side of the course. But this guy was still moving. That poor guy was having a LONG day when he gets caught by a Jeepspeed. And we caught him just before race mile 300! I'm guessing he timed out.....Anyhow, we were so shocked to see a bike that we forgot to push the pass button. He was well aware of us coming though, he saw us probably 100 yards before we were on him and he moved over to the side. We joked about that for a while...'he must have been riding on two flat tires from the start to get caught by us...' lol. I suspect they had some sort of mechanical issue in reality, perhaps even a hurt rider and by the time they got the bike back to a teamate to continue they were that for down or something....Wish I would have paid attention to the number to see if they finished.
once the big trucks pass you and tear up the coarse, it's a total shitshow for the bikes and very slow going. add to that if you're Iroman'ing it or have any technical difficulties with the bike, or (like you said) got hurt, etc... if you get caught early (like ndvaliam said he ran out of gas early), you have many 100s of miles of that stuff. I'm glad he finished safely.
 

AngryShawn

Well-Known Member
362 was my team, HUGE thanks to Dave and crew for actually helping us salvage two finishes.

Even though the fuel issue was a huge bummer which should not have happened (we're still trying to figure it out), the upside was we were able to help a good friend finish his race, here is the short version:
Waiting at top gun as darkness fell, I got a text saying my buddy Rod (running IM AM) had a lighting failure around RM460 and he was dead in the water with no lights. His crew asked if I would ride in with him and of course there was no question as to the answer.

My teammate Ray arrived and I made my way through Millers and found Rod parked safely off the course, feeling pretty damn dejected. To make matters even more challenging, his e-start had fallen victim to the electrical gremlin that took out his lights.
We had a chat and he decided to try our luck with two bikes and one headlight, D2G style.
It took a bit to find the right groove in terms of who rode where for the best use of available light, but we ended up riding the last 40 miles to the finish almost entirely side by side. Even though he had been on the bike all day solo, Rod was pushing me to go faster in places!

Anyone that has been there knows what that section looks like, so to say it was an adventure is an understatement.
Rod could have called it quits anytime, but he dug deep and pulled it off, truly embodying the perseverance and spirit of not only Ironmanning, but of desert racing as a whole. He is truly a bad@ss!
I'm so lucky and incredibly thankful to have been in the right place at the right time (for once) to make a difference.

Obligatory finish line photo, from left: Rod, Me, Chip (IM AM 2017 winner)
IMG952340.jpg
 

ndvalium

Rescue Director
362 was my team, HUGE thanks to Dave and crew for actually helping us salvage two finishes.

Even though the fuel issue was a huge bummer which should not have happened (we're still trying to figure it out), the upside was we were able to help a good friend finish his race, here is the short version:
Waiting at top gun as darkness fell, I got a text saying my buddy Rod (running IM AM) had a lighting failure around RM460 and he was dead in the water with no lights. His crew asked if I would ride in with him and of course there was no question as to the answer.

My teammate Ray arrived and I made my way through Millers and found Rod parked safely off the course, feeling pretty damn dejected. To make matters even more challenging, his e-start had fallen victim to the electrical gremlin that took out his lights.
We had a chat and he decided to try our luck with two bikes and one headlight, D2G style.
It took a bit to find the right groove in terms of who rode where for the best use of available light, but we ended up riding the last 40 miles to the finish almost entirely side by side. Even though he had been on the bike all day solo, Rod was pushing me to go faster in places!

Anyone that has been there knows what that section looks like, so to say it was an adventure is an understatement.
Rod could have called it quits anytime, but he dug deep and pulled it off, truly embodying the perseverance and spirit of not only Ironmanning, but of desert racing as a whole. He is truly a bad@ss!
I'm so lucky and incredibly thankful to have been in the right place at the right time (for once) to make a difference.

Obligatory finish line photo, from left: Rod, Me, Chip (IM AM 2017 winner)
View attachment 204163

Oh man I saw you guys come in together and didnt even click that was you guys that helped him - I wish I have been a little more alert! it was a long day for us all at that point! great rest of the story!!!
 
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