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Rate my garbage weld.

#1
Wouldn't mind some criticism on my welding skills.

Tig setup: scratch start tig setup, DC inverter with tig torch and argon bottle and regulator. Set to 160amps, 3/32 thoriated tungsten. 20cf/hr on the regulator, stubby gas lens and #8 alumina cup.

Obviously I could greatly benefit from a better setup. However I want to make sure my technique is improving first.

The weld: 1/4 hot rolled plate to 1/4 thick angle iron. Non structural just needed about an inch per side to hold it in position.
Was running 1/8 316L filler rod. Also this was overhead. First time attempting overhead.

My training: literally YouTube. Did some mig welding back in high school. Just been a hobby learning how to tig.
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gwizz

Well-Known Member
#2
play with 16g to get a better understanding of tig. your not going to learn any techniques on something that thick with that little amperage. scratch start is meh. not ideal but not a deal breaker, your probably gridging your tungsten all the time anyways.

aka start burning through stuff so you can figure out how not to. also clean metal takes out other variables so keep that in mind.
 

burninfuel

Well-Known Member
#4
try smaller rod, .060 and .093 and get real steady, I usually hold the tungsten and pivot on my little finger. not to move up and down closer and farther from weld
 

gwizz

Well-Known Member
#5
try smaller rod, .060 and .093 and get real steady, I usually hold the tungsten and pivot on my little finger. not to move up and down closer and farther from weld
torch English is torch English, i would suggest he stirs it hard to get an idea of arc shape and direction relative to torch angle. the grind on the tungsten also focus's or broadens this effect.

a practical example being when you feel the heat change at your hand once you strike your tungsten with rod or get a ball on the end when welding DC.

small rod is great for small stuff and caps, but for welding big crap you want big rod (3/32 or larger, even bundles if your doing real crap)and big amps like 250plus minimum. if your not set to nuclear you wont be able to out run your heat and the work will actually be hotter/your welds will be hotter. hard concept to fathom, running the machine hotter to be cooler with your work piece but once you realize amps set your pace it will start to make sense.

oh and always watch your toe lines. in fact i would alsmot go as far as to say the toe lines are the only thing you need to worry about.
 

gwizz

Well-Known Member
#6
remember the pedal is like a gas pedal, your not going to really be going anywhere until you start flooring it, but you cant floor it all the time or else you will crash. that dial on the machine is for how much horse power you want or hors torqs if your a diesel guy. dont be afraid to "turn it up" remember ultimately you control the throttle.
 
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