rod ends

empire231

Well-Known Member
Posts
262
Reaction
0
ok this is a rookie question, but what are the basics to replacing them? when installing the new ones, how do you know how far to thread them on? any other adice is appreciated. it's a 2000 gmc sierra 2wd
 

matt_helton

Racer
Posts
3,876
Reaction
300
uhhhhhhhh............. are you talking about tie rod ends???? loosen the nut and whack the steering nuckle with a hammer to break it loose or use a pickle fork. measure the threads showing before you loosen the jamb nut and install the new end in reverse order so that there is the same number of thread showing. that will get you real close. of course, the "proper" way is to have the front end aligned after a tie rod end replacement, but you can set the toe your self with a tape measure if you know what you are doing.
 

FABRICATOR

Well-Known Member
Posts
5,147
Reaction
107
Look up "setting toe-in" in a service manual.
 

desertracer

Well-Known Member
Posts
2,073
Reaction
31
I have a 96 1500 2wd and I think I might have some worn out steering parts, I not sure. I have a LT kit on it with 33x 12.5's. Every now and then it gets a wierd shake for a few sec., very similar to warped brakes feeling/ a back and forth movement in the steering wheel, and goes away. It happens a various speeds and mainly on rougher roads. It just started doing this a few weeks ago. Things that might be wrong are: tie rods, idler or pitman arms, or steering box. I had the b/j's checked and they appear to be ok.How do I rule out some of the above items from my possible list of problems? I had one of my front tires balanced where the problem seemed to starting and since then it has gotten better but is not gone, might get the other one checked as well. The tires are pro comp at's with about 24k on them, not sure if they could cause the problem if they are getting worn out? Sorry for the scattered info but it should all be there. Thanks for the help.
 

empire231

Well-Known Member
Posts
262
Reaction
0
lift the truck up and pull on the sides of the tire and check to see if there is alot of play at the tie rods; that should be able to tell you if those are bad. also pull on the wheel to see if it has alot of play, could be wheel bearings?
 

FABRICATOR

Well-Known Member
Posts
5,147
Reaction
107
A really effective and easy way is to carefully watch (and feel) the various components while someone rocks the steering back and forth. This needs to be done with the vehicle on the ground (pavement) in park, parking brake set. This puts a good load on all the parts. The only thing this method does not thoroughly check is ball joints or king pins. Keep in mind that all OEM tie rod ends and ball joints have springs in them to keep the ball and socket seated regardless of wear. The correct way to check these is to compress them and see how much they move. New units compress very little or not at all. Worn units will compress anywhere from 1/16" to 1/4" depending on their size. The spring makes finding wear by other means tricky at best. Big tires or other heavy loads can overcome the spring and let the ball briefly slop around in the socket.
 
Top