Safety wiring on Off-road vehicals

J Sanchez

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I recently went to the SCORE race in Laughlin. I noticed only a few cars and trucks with safety wiring. Is there a better method now a days? What are the + and - of safety wiring?
 
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We break stuff off more than having it rattle loose?
 

gawdodirt

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Loc-tite or ny-lock nuts.

Safety wire looks cool, but takes time. I was instructed by an aircraft mechanic to do it without the pliers since that stresses and weakens the wire.

GD
 

MH20

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In my opinion it is not optional on brake, hub, and steering components. That new Alpha car is taking it to the next level with safety wire on the battery boxes. It takes a lot of extra time, but shows that the person doing the prep is not taking any shortcuts.
 

Chris_Wilson

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Good idea to use safety wire on critical bolts that experience extreme heat cycles. different types of metals expand and contract differently and lock tite can fail to secure the fastener. And nylocks melt out when they get hot. Consider safety wire on brake and hub componets, headers, etc. For fasteners that don't get that hot, a stover style interference nut is adequate. Avoid lock washers (they can split apart leaving a loose bolt behind). And I never use nylocks on anything critical regardless of temperatures. Just another free internet opinion.
 

baja stu

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I'm with the rest of the guys. Safety wire any thing that is important. It's time consuming but well worth it. Also use loctite. Call Aircraft Spruce in Corona , CA and pickup your self these tools to make it easy.

www.aircraftspurce.com
 

la2baja

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Good idea to use safety wire on critical bolts that experience extreme heat cycles. different types of metals expand and contract differently and lock tite can fail to secure the fastener. And nylocks melt out when they get hot. Consider safety wire on brake and hub componets, headers, etc. For fasteners that don't get that hot, a stover style interference nut is adequate. Avoid lock washers (they can split apart leaving a loose bolt behind). And I never use nylocks on anything critical regardless of temperatures. Just another free internet opinion.

Exactly what Chris said. We use safety wire on any critical bolt especially those exposed to drastic heat changes. Takes longer to tow a broken car off the course, than to safety wire during your prep!

As Carl said earlier if you are going to use the pliers, use an extra bit of wire and I like a loose twist. If you twist the wire to tight is more likely to fracture.
 

loufish

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For many items safety wire(or also know as "lockwireing") is the best way to insure critical fasteners don't come undone...Any application where heat would kill the nylon rules out a Nylock set up.
If you've never lock wired before, have somebody give you a quick lesson or maybe there's a vid on the 'net. It's important to make sure the wire is really pulling the fastener in the correct direction...I know this sounds self evident, but many beginners get this wrong.
As a FAA licensed A&P mechanic, I've done my share and make it look easy, but it kind of like welding, it takes practice to get it right...Spruce Aircraft has real good prices on lock wire, start with .032" it's the most common size...
 

TrademarkTim

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im glad i came across this thread. im going to be installing some bolt on snouts to my truck and i was thinking of doing this since they are hard to access for prep once the brakes and everything else are installed. i have some questions.

1. can you just drill into any bolt or will some become weakened be doing so?
2. what size hole do you drill?
3. whats the basic technique?
4. i plan to still use lock tite on the threads...ok?
5. once done is it done forever or do i need to remove the wire and re check the bolts?
 

la2baja

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im glad i came across this thread. im going to be installing some bolt on snouts to my truck and i was thinking of doing this since they are hard to access for prep once the brakes and everything else are installed. i have some questions.

1. can you just drill into any bolt or will some become weakened be doing so?
2. what size hole do you drill?
3. whats the basic technique?
4. i plan to still use lock tite on the threads...ok?
5. once done is it done forever or do i need to remove the wire and re check the bolts?

1. I would not suggest trrying to drill your own holes. Bolts should be at least grade 8 so you will likely kill a ton of bits. Also you don't want to heat the head of the bolt once it has already been tempered.

2. just buy them

4. lock tite and wire is fine. Can't hurt to be redundant on critical hardware.

5. You should recheck the bolts. You should also recheck the wire after each race. Wire is cheap so never hurts to redo it and be sure.

If you aren't racing but prerunning. or out for fun on weekends, give it a couple hundred miles and then check it again. Adjust the frequency of mtce. according to the conditions you find the wire and bolts in.

Good luck.
 

mebuildit

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I work in the Aerospace/ Missile defense programs and everything that is not lockwired is self locking. There are only a few fasteners that get locktite, but from what I have seen over the years are lockwire everything you can, use the correct thread lubricant especially in high heat applications, and torque break loose and torque again. Doing this helps "seat" the fastener in.
This is a spec. that we use where I work and if you look hard enough I'm sure anyone can find it too. Ours are company owned so I can't post the actual requirement but this should help you get started.
 

MH20

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im glad i came across this thread. im going to be installing some bolt on snouts to my truck and i was thinking of doing this since they are hard to access for prep once the brakes and everything else are installed. i have some questions.

1. can you just drill into any bolt or will some become weakened be doing so?
2. what size hole do you drill?
3. whats the basic technique?
4. i plan to still use lock tite on the threads...ok?
5. once done is it done forever or do i need to remove the wire and re check the bolts?

1. You can drill your own fasteners, there is relatively low stress in the head of the bolt. If you can find the fastener you need with the heads pre-drilled, buy them, they save a lot of time.
2. 1/16"
3. Use the jig i posted a link to above, it makes life very easy and you rarely brake drill bits.
4. Yes, using locktite will not hurt anything. Its a very good idea to do so on critical parts as long.
5. Its done until you need to remove the bolts, until the wire needs replacement. It kind of depends on how intensive your prep schedule is. But as long as the wire is still in good shape (and installed in the correct direction as mentioned above), you have a visual indicator that the fastener is still tight.
 

DSRacing

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Can someone post a picture of a correctly wired bolt? I'm not visualizing it completely.
Thanks in advance

Here you go, this is from the Wilwood brake site.

wired3.jpg


wired1.jpg


wired7.jpg
 
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