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SCORE Stock Pro UTV

DRZ_Motorsports_119

Well-Known Member
Hi to all,

What is the difference in SCORE’s new Stock Pro UTV class VS the other UTV classes?

It’s looks like a modern of the shelf new Class 11 class.
 

One-Eyed Peter

Well-Known Member
I was wondering the same thing. I looked on the SCORE website, and the "Pro Stock UTV - NA and FI" rules are very different than Pro UTV NA or Pro UTV FI. For example, NO AFTERMARKET SUSPENSION is allowed except for tie rods and radius rods, but reinforcing material can be added as long as stock dimensions are retained. You must use OEM steering components, except aftermarket ball joints w/ OEM fitment. Surprisingly it states you can use the OEM fuel tank, but must install an "additional rear tubing bar for protection." In my opinion, I'm not sure if this is the best place to save money since a fuel cell is not a performance item. It says you must use OEM radiator in stock location. Must use OEM clutch. And I didn't see it spelled out, but I'm assuming you must retain the OEM frame not just the OEM pivot points. If not, then I'm completely confused about the intent of this class. Overall this class seems like a good idea to me. Hopefully it will help keep costs down and show which UTV manufacturers are stronger out of the box, and not what team can build the best full-blown, purpose-built, tig-welded racecar that "appears" to look like a stock UTV.
 

Bricoop

Well-Known Member
I was wondering the same thing. I looked on the SCORE website, and the "Pro Stock UTV - NA and FI" rules are very different than Pro UTV NA or Pro UTV FI. For example, NO AFTERMARKET SUSPENSION is allowed except for tie rods and radius rods, but reinforcing material can be added as long as stock dimensions are retained. You must use OEM steering components, except aftermarket ball joints w/ OEM fitment. Surprisingly it states you can use the OEM fuel tank, but must install an "additional rear tubing bar for protection." In my opinion, I'm not sure if this is the best place to save money since a fuel cell is not a performance item. It says you must use OEM radiator in stock location. Must use OEM clutch. And I didn't see it spelled out, but I'm assuming you must retain the OEM frame not just the OEM pivot points. If not, then I'm completely confused about the intent of this class. Overall this class seems like a good idea to me. Hopefully it will help keep costs down and show which UTV manufacturers are stronger out of the box, and not what team can build the best full-blown, purpose-built, tig-welded racecar that "appears" to look like a stock UTV.
Some good discussion around fuel safety here: Are UTV’s faster than 10 cars

It'd be great to see a class like this grow. More participants should make racing fees cheaper for other classes.
 

wayne matlock

Well-Known Member
Yes, you do have to retain the stock frame. It should be stated in the rules, if not they need to be updated. This class will grow and bring new people into offroad racing.
 

NIKAL

Well-Known Member
I too think this class could be huge! But the rules are going to have to be very clear on what you Can Do, and what you Cant Do.

It needs to be spelled out very clearly that “You can only change items listed in the rules below. If it does not say you can change or alter, then it must remain stock from the factory.” All non legal alterations will be a DQ.

Also frame repair must be spelled out. Because next thing you know tubes are added, pivots are manipulated & beefed up, because they say; I was just fixing a bent or broken pivot tab.

What about shocks? It says nothing about shocks. So I’d assume you must run factory unaltered shocks?

What about cross pollination parts? High clearance a-arms or radius rods off a rock edition, or better shocks or different brand shock from another edition?

Also I’d assume you Can’t take a 4 seat chassis and make it a 2 seat chassis? If you want to run the 4 seat chassis then your seating must remain in the stock location?

I think there also needs to be a top 5 post race tech, to inspect the cars closely, to insure the rules are being followed without the use of a racer having to file a protest against another racer. To much of the car is covered in plastic panels that manipulation would be fairly easy.
 
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DTA 55

Well-Known Member
The no aftermarket suspension pretty much guaranteed no Can-am cars will be entering, and if they do it is a death sentence.

I understand no long travel, stock geometry and so on, but really? Stock arms and trailing arms....DUMB.

We were looking forward to this class and that just put a huge dent in those hopes.

Congratulations Polaris, you win again.

And yes I see it says reinforcement, but that is bunk.


If I were in on these talks it would be very simple:

OEM fuel tank

OEM clutch

OEM frame

OEM suspension geometry

OEM pivot points

OEM steering box

OEM uprights

OEM brakes

OEM wheelbase

OEM turbo

OEM shock size (lengths and diameter) any manufacturer approved

Ball joints, rod ends or uniballs approved wherever needed

Single shock per wheel / no bumpstops

32" max tire size

2 seat or 4 seat configs approved, but must retain all original seating configuration
 

Zambo

Well-Known Member
I talked to the tech director and he said aftermarket arms were ok they just needed to be stock size in the stock pivot points. Regardless, the CanAm arms would be fine with gussets added. I agree the wording needs to be clearer.
 

NIKAL

Well-Known Member
After looking at the rules as listed on the Score website. It needs a ton of work! They should never have posted rules until it’s complete and clear. There are more rules for the other UTV classes or unlimited classes then what’s shown for the Stock UTV class.

Now Zambo gets confirmation that aftermarket suspension is allowed as long as it’s stock dimensions? So chromolly, thicker bigger tubing is legal, or a full box plated suspension kit is legal? Just fit stock dimensions? I guess if you buy a 72 inch wide UTV you can basically have the same aftermarket suspension as the other Pro UTV classes?

What if anything are they going to do about CPU reflashes? That’s not stock?

So long of the UTV version of class 11 or stock production truck. This class will be easy to exploit, and will be unless they get very detailed in the rules & enforcement.
 

Zambo

Well-Known Member
Well I think if I was going to spend that much money on a car I would just enter the pro class. The stock class, even with the poor wording, still seems like a relatively inexpensive way to enter a SCORE race in a car that's a lot faster than many other classes. FWIW I put over 5000 miles on my stock trailing arms, including many Baja pre-runs and last year's NORRA race. And that was without any gussets, which you can now buy pre-cut from S3 to make the arms a LOT stronger. Honestly I think just gusseting stock arms is a better approach to forming a budget class.
 

NIKAL

Well-Known Member
Well I think if I was going to spend that much money on a car I would just enter the pro class. The stock class, even with the poor wording, still seems like a relatively inexpensive way to enter a SCORE race in a car that's a lot faster than many other classes. FWIW I put over 5000 miles on my stock trailing arms, including many Baja pre-runs and last year's NORRA race. And that was without any gussets, which you can now buy pre-cut from S3 to make the arms a LOT stronger. Honestly I think just gusseting stock arms is a better approach to forming a budget class.
I agree, and that is why I think the rules need to be clear that you must run stock production suspension components, that my be strengthened. This will not only keep the class more on budget as intended, but also teach driving skill, as it will be about not only driving, but making the car last. Most can go fast, but can you be fast & smooth to not distroy the vehicle.

Also the stock fuel tank or fuel cell option needs to be clarified. I think no matter what tank you chose, it needs to be the same gallons as stock. Because the benefits of having a 15-18 gal cell vs. a 10 gal tank is huge.
 

TRAVISD

Well-Known Member
I agree, and that is why I think the rules need to be clear that you must run stock production suspension components, that my be strengthened. This will not only keep the class more on budget as intended, but also teach driving skill, as it will be about not only driving, but making the car last. Most can go fast, but can you be fast & smooth to not distroy the vehicle.

Also the stock fuel tank or fuel cell option needs to be clarified. I think no matter what tank you chose, it needs to be the same gallons as stock. Because the benefits of having a 15-18 gal cell vs. a 10 gal tank is huge.


I agree, i just did 1400 miles down to cabo in mine and it worked great with no issues. Fuel situation will definetly be an issue. Stock tank i was able to stretch it out to 120 miles one day but in a race you would be looking at fueling every 100 miles.

The class should be stock arms only strengthen no aftermarket ones. Shock revalve, tie-rods can be changed thats it.
 

Zambo

Well-Known Member
Disagree, stock trailing arms are junk even with gussets. I bent mine in the first d38 race entered.

Front arms were replaced on my car the first time I saw one bend on the internet. I said I'm not going to let my weekend get ruined by that.

Do you know how much I spent on my front and rear arms which will now not bend? About $4000.

$4000 to take out a huge equation of DNF in a race that could have an entry fee of $4000 (b1k was $4k recently right?). I think this is a no brainer and I really dont think $4000 for suspension components 100x better and stronger than stock or gussets and does not affect the integrity of the stock idea for the class.

I guess it's just personal opinion but there is no way I would invest money into a race where I know I have a preexisting weak point like canam does.

But with new knowledge, what exactly did the race director say?

Why is it not in writing?

I ask this because I had found these rules out before they were published and ththe same thing was told to me. Oem arms only. I laughed and figured I'll go race CODE if I want to go to baja.
And yet, others have raced on them and not broken them.
 

DTA 55

Well-Known Member
Somehow my post got deleted.

Anyway, agree to disagree, I think the oem suspension on a canam is a disadvantage compared to the polaris oem suspension.

What exactly did the race director say about aftermarket suspension and why is it not spelled out in the rules?
 

Zambo

Well-Known Member
Somehow my post got deleted.

Anyway, agree to disagree, I think the oem suspension on a canam is a disadvantage compared to the polaris oem suspension.

What exactly did the race director say about aftermarket suspension and why is it not spelled out in the rules?
I thought I already said what he said. This was a phone call so I can't copy and paste anything, but I asked him if I had to use the stock CanAm trailing arms or if I could buy a set of aftermarket arms that bolt into the stock location and he said that was fine. I don't think they make any distinction between the trailing arm, which is just a linkage, and any other linkages in the suspension. Just stock size and pivot. Someone who plans on racing this class definitely needs to follow up.

FWIW I now have aftermarket trailing arms and have run aftermarket lower A arms for a while. However my stock trailing arms lasted over 5000 hard miles and although I'm starting to get a few cracks, if I had to run a new set of arms they are about 200 bucks apiece. The gusset kit from S3 would make these arms a ton stronger and I know they would finish a race unless you drive like a caveman. On top of that the FUTV bash guard that you can put on the trailing arm greatly reduces the chance of breaking it by smacking it on a rock. The upper A arms are plenty strong. The lower A arms have a bend that will fold if you take a big lateral hit, but you can buy a very nice gusset kit to fix that for 70 bucks.

The class isn't going to be as fast as the pro class simply because the cars are more stock than their full-race counterparts. This is true of every stock vs open class.
 

NIKAL

Well-Known Member
Each brand will have its advantages and disadvantages. The Can Am has a much longer wheelbase, which you can’t duplicate. No matter how much suspension tuning you do, you can’t make up for wheelbase.

The idea is to drive your vehicle to its limit, not yours. If your faster then your car, then you have the ability to step up and race in one of the other Pro UTV classes. Think class 11 or when BITD has the stock production classes, that is what this UTV class is. It’s a budget entry class, that allows you to race the big Score races.

I think off the production floor, the WildcatXX in the N/A class is going to be a great choice, as it’s got a ton of race durable parts vs the other brands in the N/A class.
 
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DTA 55

Well-Known Member
I thought I already said what he said. This was a phone call so I can't copy and paste anything, but I asked him if I had to use the stock CanAm trailing arms or if I could buy a set of aftermarket arms that bolt into the stock location and he said that was fine. I don't think they make any distinction between the trailing arm, which is just a linkage, and any other linkages in the suspension. Just stock size and pivot. Someone who plans on racing this class definitely needs to follow up.
Interesting, I guess that puts it to rest, now to get it in writing and I guess get a SCORE tag?

Thanks for the info.
 

wayne matlock

Well-Known Member
I have been involved with helping score create this class for the last year-and-a-half. The whole point of the class is to keep it as inexpensive as possible. If someone told you that they can replace the stock arms with aftermarket manufacture arms that was a complete misunderstanding. The only thing you will be able to replace on the suspension is the radius rods and tie rods. If you start switching out the arms then this class becomes the same as the other UTV classes already in existence. We're not trying to favor one brand over the other. Both Can-Am and Polaris have there disadvantages or advantages. And don't forget that Yamaha and Honda can also be major players in this class as well. The whole intent on this class is the keep as much stock as possible, there for keeping the cost down to be competitive. If you go and put on a set of Cognito replacement arms you just spent $4,000 and that is a direct advantage over the guy that has stock arms. Because now you can push and drive your car harder then the other guy.

The rules definitely need a little help tightening up Loose Ends and what ifs. If you have any comments or suggestions please reach out to Dan Cornwell The Tech director. He really wants to get it right and help this class grow.
 

jon coleman

Well-Known Member
is it possible some worker at a sxs factory might ' accidently ' slap cro- moly plate in the press& that certain part makes it into a pro stock team 's suspension, frame or whatever? jus' wundern?,,,
 

Zambo

Well-Known Member
Thanks Wayne. I'm pretty sure that Dan is the guy I called as his number is the one listed on the SCORE site. Just relaying the convo that we had. Again, I agree with the decision to keep the arms stock.
 

Total Loss

Well-Known Member
Stock should be as close to STOCK as possible.

Safety stuff only.
Nets, welded cage, secondary latches. Stock fuel tank and cap
I agree on 32's though and any wheel you choose.
Stock suspension and shocks. (internals and springs allowed for tuning)
Clutch kit for stock unit and tune (stock fuel system) for the 32's allowed...stock exhaust.
Stock suspension and hub width.
Stock frame with gusseting allowed.

Basically stock with a tune for various systems.
 
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