Sequential shifting

Big Whitey

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so lately I’ve heard different opinions on proper shifting of a sequential trans, clutch or no clutch on a sequential that is NOT equipped with a no lift shift set up. What’s the opinion on proper shifting technique?
 

ErikIrvine

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I do it with no clutch. Not sure if it wears it out more, but that's FinishLine & Paramounts problem to worry about anyway. Weddle S5 manual that came with my trans says you can shift with no clutch so game on in my eyes
 

turbodon

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Folts says they SHOULD NOT be no-lift shifted if you do not have a baller ecu that is programmed to cut the fuel or spark for the split microsecond during the shift....
 

ErikIrvine

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I think he's asking if you can do it without the clutch but still letting off the gas and unloading the trans
 

swiftracing5

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Uh oh Greg got his first seq rebuild bill...
 

critter81

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From years of racing with these things on pavement, you really need to have either the fuel or ignition cut out for a milli second to shift without the clutch. You can either do that electronically (preferred method) or by taking your foot off the gas (not the best as you only have a few milli seconds to shift before the transmission reloads on the down side of the RPMs.) otherwise use the clutch. Or buy a bunch of transmissions
 

swiftracing5

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I always use clutch, I learned on pre 1970 British car though where shifting into first gear basically required the car to be shut off.

I have had steep rebuild bills still fwiw. I believe you can have “Big Dogs” installed by folts to reduce wear from shifting. I don’t see much upside of not clutching, or a downside to taking the millisecond to clutch? But I’m sure there are so some, so please tell
 

E.Hagle

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Fortin 6 speed on our alumicraft class 10 is equipped with no lift shift and I still use the clutch going between 1st and second at lower speeds or when I’m warming up the blood. When it’s go time and the car is around 70 I’m glad we don’t have to use the clutch though, the car has so much travel and upsetting to balance at high speed through a corner could get interesting. I’d sell a wedding ring and buy the trick computer. Worth it.
 

Viola1685

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I’ll bite too we have the fortin 6 speed sequential it does not have the no lift shift so once we take off I don’t use the clutch unless coming to a stop. I do lift off the gas for a quick second when I shift though. Trans always makes it 3-4 races defending in length
 

Big Whitey

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I’ll bite too we have the fortin 6 speed sequential it does not have the no lift shift so once we take off I don’t use the clutch unless coming to a stop. I do lift off the gas for a quick second when I shift though. Trans always makes it 3-4 races defending in length
I agree with that scenario. That is how I shift. Not trying to no lift shift. Just smooth and clutch to stop
 

E.Hagle

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A good friend of mine growing up was the son of a guy named Mike Jakobson. He would always talk about the mendeola in his 5 car being a glass box. Always referencing the glass box. My dad talks about his 10 car back in the day having a very vulnerable reverse gear, and apparently it’s still somewhat the same way. Why is reverse so prone to shearing? Diameter?
 

Big Whitey

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A good friend of mine growing up was the son of a guy named Mike Jakobson. He would always talk about the mendeola in his 5 car being a glass box. Always referencing the glass box. My dad talks about his 10 car back in the day having a very vulnerable reverse gear, and apparently it’s still somewhat the same way. Why is reverse so prone to shearing? Diameter?
The MD series 4/5 Speeds (H pattern) have a smaller narrower reverse gear that is not designed to be anything more than a tool for backing up gently. I just blew mine out in my prerunner at the B1k after getting buried in sand while pulling ( forward) out one of our razors that blew a clutch. I tried to back up gentlly to get out but it went bye bye anyhow.
The mendeola sequential 4/5 and the newish HV2 4 and 5 speed H pattern trans have a larger reverse gear that is not as easy to break. I have no clue what the Fortin has for reverse gears.
 

partybarge_pilot

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A good friend of mine growing up was the son of a guy named Mike Jakobson. He would always talk about the mendeola in his 5 car being a glass box. Always referencing the glass box. My dad talks about his 10 car back in the day having a very vulnerable reverse gear, and apparently it’s still somewhat the same way. Why is reverse so prone to shearing? Diameter?

Mikey was hard on parts, really hard. We o-ringed that trans because it got rebuilt so much it saved a lot of time. First Fortin to have that LOL. The change to 934's also caused a lot of problems till we went back to axles that were the same diameter as the old 930 axles.

Edit, car never had a Spendiola in it, it was always a Fortin.
 
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