Shock Plate thickness

DOG ON

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I recently took this picture in Foddrill's store, Its a class 1.....

I want to fabricate a similar setup for my old class 10 Lothinger. What thickness plate should I use for a setup like the one on the pictures?

Thanks guys
 

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movindirt

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What are you planning to use, 4130 or mild? Looks like they are using .188 on the car pictured but it may be .125. If done properly .125 should work for a lighter car.
 

DOG ON

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I dont have access to anything here, but mild steel ....What do you recommend? It will have an Ecotec on the back with an old SCORE compliant Lothinger chasis class 10
 

partybarge_pilot

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3/16? Building battle ships are we? 1/8 with some .090 overlays in the appropriate sections will be more than sufficient.
 

atomicjoe23

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Nope. . .not building battleships, but you realize that 0.125" w/0.090" overalys is thicker than 3/16". . .not by much, just about 1/32".

If you are going for the bling factor (or are trying to save every ounce of weight that you can) and don't mind spending money on both 0.125" plate and 0.090" plate (or sheet whatever you want to call it. . .doesn't really matter in the big scheme of things) and having to cut extra plate, drill extra holes, and do close to twice as much welding for basically the same thing then yes using 0.125" w/a 0.090" stiffener plate is the way to go, but. . .

if you are looking for what is functional, what is going to work and not break, is equally reliable for less money and you don't mind trading the money you save for a little bit of "man that looks really cool when they double the plates like that". . .which it does and I'm a big fan of it. . .the my personal opinion is to just go with 3/16" and be done with it.

Less time fabbing means more time driving!
 

partybarge_pilot

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Nope. . .not building battleships, but you realize that 0.125" w/0.090" overalys is thicker than 3/16". . .not by much, just about 1/32".
But only in the areas needed like around the shock mount holes. You start throwing 3/16 plate every where and he's going to end up with a 10 car that weights the same as a 1 car.......

1/8 with weld on washers would be more than enough. Or .090 main plate with .090 overlays. Spend a little extra time on the design and you'll end up with a much better part.
 

atomicjoe23

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I agree with you on spending time on the design. . .design is one of the most important parts of any vehicle, especially a desert racing buggy!

You are right. . .you shouldn't go overboard on your materials, I have done it once in the past and the buggy ended up weight about 1.6 times as much as I wanted. I learned my lesson there.

I assumed this was something that wasn't getting made in a full-on fab shop so was trying to give the nod to practical and reliable (without going overboard. . .I don't think using 3/16" mild material for shock mounts is overkill in terms of weight) without being overly complex and expensive.

That being said the weld-on washers is an excellent idea. . .the bolt hole area should be one of your major concerns and should be thick enough to prevent the area of becoming deformed and the washers would be an excellent and low cost way of keeping the weight down, preventing deformation of the bolt holes, and minimizing fab time.

Great suggestion!
 

bigtex

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Just finished building the new front end on my racetruck and I used 3/16 on all my shock plates. I have never seen a racecar broken down on the side of the race track because it was over built. If you use 3/16 verus 1/8 you will save maybe 5ibs on the shock mounts. Now if you used 3/16 on all your plating for your entire car you still may only add 20ibs, not a huge difference.
 

loufish

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For many parts that I would use .125" 4130, I'd use .188" if in mild steel...Of course you should use some good judgement, a tab holding a wire loom doesn't need to be .188", but when it come to highly stressed parts like shock mounts, I'd use my above rule and sleep well...;)
 
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