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shock question

JOSH

Well-Known Member
I was wondering what some of you guys are running on your dual rate coils (lb/in.) and length of each spring? My project is a 96' Sonoma w/ a 4.3l V-6, I'm guessing its not to much heaver than a ranger w/ a 4L V-6.
I plan on using 2.5" SAW Race Runners w/ reservoirs.

Any ideas would really help.

Thanks allot
Josh
 

TRDshaunTRD

Well-Known Member
First, do you have stock a-arms and what kind of travel can get out of those will determin your stroke length of your shock? For example, if you get 12" with stock arms you can prabably use a 10" shock. The spring rate will have to do with the type of driving you do too, and the length of the shock, not just weight of your truck. Do you use it for offroad much? What kind of offroading do you do? Big jumps? Smooth/slightly rocky trails? whoops? The harder you hit it, the more weight you want rated for your coils. people have been running anywhere from 350 over 500 to something like 500 over 600, or even 500 over 500. You should find out from other simular sonoma/s-10 owners what they use.
 

JOSH

Well-Known Member
I'm going to want it pretty stiff (big jumps, big whoops) (I don't care at all if my ride is stiff on the street) I am having custom arms made so I'm not exactly sure how much travel I will end up with. (in the neighborhood of 12-16" hopefully) I am doing allot of cutting and plating to my chassis where my old coil buckets used to be and I'm going to run upper like the ones on the Sean Sessa F-150 (J-Arm???) my lowers are just going to use the stock pivots but they are allot longer (6" wider per side than my Fabtech lowers) and I will be using heims throughout. But I'm doing everything but building the arms my self, so I have allot of questions. Thanks for all your help.

Josh
 

JOSH

Well-Known Member
Oh yeah I would ask other guys with S-10's but..well, we are kida rare. DO you know any one with a S-series truck??

Thanks
Josh
 

V8Ranger

Well-Known Member
Also keep in mind that the spring rates depend on your piviot points ( where you mount your shock in relation to where the arm piviots and where tire is. The closer the shock is to where the arm bolts to the frame the more leverage the tire has on the shock so you are going to need a stiffer spring. How the arms are build is pretty important so I'd wait to determine your spring rate needed after you knew exactly what the arm is going to look like.
 

Dylan

Well-Known Member
MOTION RATIO
MOTION RATIO
MOTION RATIO
MOTION RATIO
You can’t begin to pick spring rates until you know three things!
Weight?
Total travel?
Coil over mounting position? (location on arm and angle)

When you have this info feel free to give me a call @ Sway-A-Way and I will be happy to help you calculate some spring rates.

(818)700-9712 ext.232 or ask for Dylan
 

rdc

- users no longer part of the rdc family -
Check out sway-a-way's web site, go to spring rate calculator, they have a lot of good formulas.
 

Jack

Well-Known Member
It is much easyer for you guys to calculate this with a-arms or beams, try doing it with the straight front axle, you have a variable length lever depending on what the other side is doing. On our J-10, we ended with a stange combonation of 100 ove 300 on the front. That is on a 16" shock and fully crossed it measers over 24" travel at the hub (16" straight up and down)
 

TRDshaunTRD

Well-Known Member
Dylan and V8 rabger called it with, "spring rates depend on your piviot points ( where you mount your shock in relation to where the arm piviots and where tire is)" that also determins the travel. After you get your arms in, and figure out where you mount the shock, that will determin the travel of the shock nesissary. the further away the coil is from the tire is too, you will need a stronger spring like V8ranger said too.
 

JOSH

Well-Known Member
Would it be better for me to mount the shock closer to the wheel? or closer to the pivots?? what are the pros and cons of each?? it seems to me that you could get more use out of your shock if it was closer to the wheel? But hey I'm just some punk kid What do I Know???

Thanks for your help guys..
Josh
 

TRDshaunTRD

Well-Known Member
well, I'm not a pro fab guy but from what I understand, its good to have the lower mount on the lower arm closer to the wheel, and the upper sloping away from the outside and that would give you the best dampning. But you also have to use a longer stroked shock, and have a softer spring rate and there is more work for the shock to do. On the other hand if you mount it closer to the mounting points from the frame to the arms you can use a shorter stroke with a stiffer spring, you get more wheel travel for less shock movement. Typically there is already a geometry set up with bolt on kits for the lower mount and the upper would be fabbed. I have heard that the best way to mount a shock is perpendicular to the arm movement. So when the arm moves up, the pivit point of the lower shock mount also moves in. Jerry from camburg or Kreg from donahoe would be able to give you the best advice for all this. Hopefully they will see this and clarify some.
 

V8Ranger

Well-Known Member
I'd try to keep it more towards the wheel becuse there will be less stress on the lower arm. Consider having a mount that was say 3 inches from the pivot points. Now instead of putting a shock there you used a piece of solid tube. Now you jumped your truck off of a 5 foot cliff. The force exerted from the ground is going to produce a moment (torque) on the lower arm. Now as you move the lower mount further out there is it less of a torque being exerted therefore your lower arm see's less of the force from the tire (in the virtical direction). Just make sure that the lower mount is far enough away from the tire so that it doesn't rub throughout the cycle (obviously!). The thing about the shock being perpendicular to the lower arm at full bump is also a good idea (in my opinion). What ever you do make sure the shock doesn't go past perpendicular, otherwise the shock reaches its most progressive point before full bump and then its gets less progressive as it hits full bump. To clarify things a bit I am not talking about the spring rates getting less progressive, because obviously the more a spring is compressed the stiffer it gets, I am simply talking about the angle of the shock.
 

Waldo

Safehouse
Just to let you know (and not to be a prick) but when you are discussing a shock and its action, the correct term is damping not dampening. There is a difference.

Dampening comes from Dampen = to deaden, dimish activity of, to make damp.

Damping comes from Damper = a valve for regulating, a device designed to bring a mechanism to rest with miminum oscillation, shock absorber.

I learned this many years ago from an old wise man (my old man) becuase I kept saying it wrong when I was talking about the forks on my mx bike.

BRAAAAAAAAP!
 

V8Ranger

Well-Known Member
BajaWaldo,

I couldn't find the word "dampen" or "dampening" anywhere on the page other that where you wrote it. I was just curious where you got it from. Maybe I overlooked it somewhere but I even used the "find in top window" option. Maybe I need to go back to bed and get more rest. But anyways you brought up a good point, I didn't know there was a difference. I guess that's why I'm not an english major.
 

Waldo

Safehouse
V8 - TRDshaunTRD wrote in his first sentence:

"Well, I'm not a pro fab guy but from what I understand, its good to have the lower mount on the lowerarm closer to the wheel, and the upper sloping away from the outside and that would give you the best dampning."

I was assuming when he wrote dampning that he meant dampening. That's probably why you could find it on the search function. The words are so similar and many people just say dampening...I used to.

BRAAAAAAAAP!
 
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