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Siren/ Horn

Racerinside

Well-Known Member
What is the best reliable horn to get for a race car? Would a siren even be worth running or would an airhorn be better?
 

hotdogwater

Well-Known Member
We have a Hella supertone. It's not enough. Most people don't hear it with their motor running. Use it to get past tech and got one of these:
 

clogking

Well-Known Member
Hay Hotdog have you used one of those air horns at speed? We/I found that at speed the incoming air counters the pressure of the can and they hardly make any noise. Racer if you can afford the money and the weight (we run a 1600) on the front of your car(the good speaker weights almost 10lbs + or so) then get a siren/horn out of a fire truck/police car. You pull/sneak up behind some one and hit the horn they move over right away they thinks its a Mack truck/TT/class1 behind them.They work great !! Good Luck
 
I'm a firefighter, and do a lot of the outfitting on my local department's vehicles. The best companies are Carson, Code 3 and Whelen. Check out www.sirennet.com, the owner is a good dude, they're "own" brand remote siren is a Whelen w/o the decal, and cheap. Air-horns aren't as loud as a "Yelp" or "Hyperyelp" tone, those work MUCH better... I'm speaking from first hand experience
 

GreatWhite

Member
I'm a firefighter, and do a lot of the outfitting on my local department's vehicles. The best companies are Carson, Code 3 and Whelen. Check out www.sirennet.com, the owner is a good dude, they're "own" brand remote siren is a Whelen w/o the decal, and cheap. Air-horns aren't as loud as a "Yelp" or "Hyperyelp" tone, those work MUCH better... I'm speaking from first hand experience
so wait you're saying that the air horns from the sirennet brand AREN'T as loud? and the the yelp hyperyelp ARE as loud or much better?
 

Race8100

Well-Known Member
I was in DC a little while back. The cops there use a super Low frequency 'thump' along with higher pitched sirens. It's really freaky when you first hear it. Anyone heard these? I would think it would pierce though our helmets better and overcome engine noise. Might be better?
 

_

Well-Known Member
Michael,

I believe you are referring to Rumbler Sirens. The concept behind the Rumbler is the significant lower tone level will penetrate through obstructions far more so than the higher pitch alarms. This allows a person to not only hear the siren, but also feel the siren. Kind of like being at a Top-Fuel drag race and feeling the low thump from the exhaust penetrate your body.

The manufacture claims that with so many distractions such as car stereos, personal music devices (with ear buds) and cell phones, pedestrians and drivers have become immune to or can no longer hear the average siren. So, they have developed the Rumbler which now allows persons to feel the siren in addition to hearing it.

The total installation package is quite large and draws approx 12-amps compared to about 7.5-amps for a pair of Hella's, and 9-amps for the average Siren set-up.
 

Power Monkey

Well-Known Member
We installed a siren on our 5U. They add a chunk of weight to a limited car but if your running fast the results are fantastic! The average time to get by slower cars went down quite a bit. Plus it beats bumping which here in Texas where it can be tight with trees one or both cars can be put at risk.
 

DesertGuy1

Well-Known Member
Other than sounding "neat", what is the purpose in having a siren on a race vehicle? Electrical sirens are primarily designed to clear traffic at relatively slow speeds, especially the electronic type. Once you reach higher speeds, you can literally hear the siren behind you. Given the speeds that race vehicles travel and the helmet insulation that will filter some higher frequencies, what benefit do they serve other than, perhaps, the spectators standing along the course?
 

Race8100

Well-Known Member
Cool. It really doesn't come through well via youtube: [video=youtube;NhTF1Cn6gc4]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhTF1Cn6gc4&feature=related[/video]

One video shows the install. The power cables going in look pretty small. It really draws that much?
 

Co-Dog

Well-Known Member
Other than sounding "neat", what is the purpose in having a siren on a race vehicle? Electrical sirens are primarily designed to clear traffic at relatively slow speeds, especially the electronic type. Once you reach higher speeds, you can literally hear the siren behind you. Given the speeds that race vehicles travel and the helmet insulation that will filter some higher frequencies, what benefit do they serve other than, perhaps, the spectators standing along the course?
We race Sportsman Truck in SCORE's Mexico races, which means that we start towards the end of the classes. On many occasions we have had to deal with oncoming traffic (usually drunk) on the course when heading toward Ojos Negros. After getting tangled with one of them, we got a Gall's siren and it has served us well. I let that thing wail, especially before bends and rises in the road. Most of the time, the vehicles will be pulling over by the time I see them, so it is clearly getting their attention.

There were times, before the siren, that we would be stuck behind a slower vehicle and they just could not hear the horn. It can also be pretty dangerous trying to pass someone that isn't aware that you're next to them. That doesn't happen anymore. They either pull over or jackrabbit. I know that I rarely can hear a horn from somebody behind us. There is something about the frequency of the siren that allows you to hear it through the "white noise" of the engine.
 

randy s

Well-Known Member
We race Sportsman Truck in SCORE's Mexico races, which means that we start towards the end of the classes. On many occasions we have had to deal with oncoming traffic (usually drunk) on the course when heading toward Ojos Negros. After getting tangled with one of them, we got a Gall's siren and it has served us well. I let that thing wail, especially before bends and rises in the road. Most of the time, the vehicles will be pulling over by the time I see them, so it is clearly getting their attention.

There were times, before the siren, that we would be stuck behind a slower vehicle and they just could not hear the horn. It can also be pretty dangerous trying to pass someone that isn't aware that you're next to them. That doesn't happen anymore. They either pull over or jackrabbit. I know that I rarely can hear a horn from somebody behind us. There is something about the frequency of the siren that allows you to hear it through the "white noise" of the engine.
gall's sirens might make your teeth bleed they're so loud. when we use ours, it's just like it's someone really fast coming......ja ja ja
 

STRICTLY

Member
Pair of hellas hi/low will be great. They are light unlike the rumbler siren that weighs close to 20 pounds and needs a siren driver module. The hella horns are quite loud and only require a momentary switch to power or ground for operation.

Jimmy
 
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