So who has the time to write an off road protocol manual?

R. Gross

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After doing retrieval at the Mint and having interaction with numerous new teams I realized that there are ALOT of new racers in our sport. To be fair, most were racers that were running in the so popular RZR classes. Not bashing on them, but with the explosion of those classes and the new technology they bring is good for the sport, but also now so many can purchase a car from a dealership and do some upgrades and they are tech ready, but this does not mean they are race ready as drivers.
Where I am going with this is that in talking with them, most did not know protocol or what they were to do next. I was wondering if anyone with some time on their hands has thought about writing a "Off Road Racing Manual" on the basic do's and don'ts with chapters relating to everything from radio use, tech, retrieval, don't hit class 11 cars, etc. Alot of the protocol we have learned over the years comes from experience and I believe some of these new racers are not educated on the subject. Credit Card, helmet and firesuit and we are off to the races.
Here are some of the issues I noticed:
1.Not one of the 15 to 20 cars I retrieved had gone back down course and put their triangles out. When I asked if they needed to go get them, they all said they were still in the car.
For some crazy reason, some would stand on the course right next to their car as other drivers were passing at full speed.
2. Some could not get radio transmission to their pits and when I asked them what their frequency was, some responded "channel 5" or "channel 11". They did not know what their radio 151.XXX was programmed to. At least write it down on the car somewhere if not memorized.
3. Based on some of the questions I was asked it seemed as if they did not read their drivers notes or any of the information BITD had provided them in their packets.
4. Very few knew where they were in relationship to any of the pits or Knight Ranch Rd.
5. When I asked them if they wanted to use their strap so their crew could just hook and go after I get them to Knight Ranch Rd, some did not have one.

Not bashing on any single class or driver, but looking into some of their eyes and how they handled themselves it was obvious that the times are a changing.
 

Zambo

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The best way to make sure you'll never need a strap, jack, triangle, sat phone, water, medical kit, traction mat, etc is to put one in the car.
 

Mxrider99

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"Rescue Robert"... You seemed to have alot of fun. I was Robert at 77. Some guys are new, Learning the sport in a "trial by Fire" type deal. We had a team who literally spoke ZERO ENGLISH. Their radios were broke, didn't know their channel, had no cell phones, and had no phone numbers to call because they didn't have their cell phones... It made for a long day for them. They sat at our check for a good 4 hours before anything happened with them...
 

mike_osborn

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After doing retrieval at the Mint and having interaction with numerous new teams I realized that there are ALOT of new racers in our sport. To be fair, most were racers that were running in the so popular RZR classes. Not bashing on them, but with the explosion of those classes and the new technology they bring is good for the sport, but also now so many can purchase a car from a dealership and do some upgrades and they are tech ready, but this does not mean they are race ready as drivers.
Where I am going with this is that in talking with them, most did not know protocol or what they were to do next. I was wondering if anyone with some time on their hands has thought about writing a "Off Road Racing Manual" on the basic do's and don'ts with chapters relating to everything from radio use, tech, retrieval, don't hit class 11 cars, etc. Alot of the protocol we have learned over the years comes from experience and I believe some of these new racers are not educated on the subject. Credit Card, helmet and firesuit and we are off to the races.
Here are some of the issues I noticed:
1.Not one of the 15 to 20 cars I retrieved had gone back down course and put their triangles out. When I asked if they needed to go get them, they all said they were still in the car.
For some crazy reason, some would stand on the course right next to their car as other drivers were passing at full speed.
2. Some could not get radio transmission to their pits and when I asked them what their frequency was, some responded "channel 5" or "channel 11". They did not know what their radio 151.XXX was programmed to. At least write it down on the car somewhere if not memorized.
3. Based on some of the questions I was asked it seemed as if they did not read their drivers notes or any of the information BITD had provided them in their packets.
4. Very few knew where they were in relationship to any of the pits or Knight Ranch Rd.
5. When I asked them if they wanted to use their strap so their crew could just hook and go after I get them to Knight Ranch Rd, some did not have one.

Not bashing on any single class or driver, but looking into some of their eyes and how they handled themselves it was obvious that the times are a changing.
Great idea. It seems that a Wikipedia page would be awesome. This way it could be compiled by the entire community making it much more thorough an much more likely to get done. It would also be searchable on the web so those new teams could find it more easily.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

R. Gross

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Me and my family had a great time. Had to get out of those spectator areas we have been going to for the last few years so doing retrieval was right up our alley. From the other posts it seemed like it was a good idea. I just posted encase there was some long term racer with some time to compile some notes on protocol to ease the learning curve. I know before almost every Baja race there is the thread Kent post on Baja protocol and I read it as a refresher course every time we go down even if it is just to watch a race.
I am going to start compiling some notes and ideas and see where it goes. Between work, 2 kids running 5-1600 and crew chiefing a new 7200 truck, time is short as most of you know.
 

dirtslinger

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How about if you smash into someone so hard that it spins them around, rolls them over, and destroys their car, maybe you should stop and see if they are OK? This did not happen to me BTW.
 

dezertthing

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My class 11 car was only hit by one car. 19xx , imagine that...
I had moved as far to the left as humanly possible on a road easily wide enough for a Semi truck to pass me. He turned down on me before even clearing his back tire. Maybe he thought I was going to stop for him....?!. Kind of a donkey move in my book.
Looks like he may have cut a tire on my bumper that he tore up.
 

EMS702

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The biggest issue I think was this race. I do not encounter many of those issues as the season goes on. Some of the racers I encountered do not race a BITD or SNORE or SCORE but small UTV series. Or just did the MINT 400 bucket list. The UTV production class are well meaning racers who are just figuring it out. The fact they did not read the information packets I think is a big problem. Those are basic instructions for racing this series. Robert thanks for helping out you were a very busy crew. I am the Rescue that sat with you during qualifying. Great hanging out with you.
 

Dirty Harry

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The fact they did not read the information packets I think is a big problem. Those are basic instructions for racing this series.
I agree. If they don’t even read what they are given now why would we think that they will read an instruction manual?
 
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And videos take too long to watch...
 

J Prich

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Imagine a world in which these sorts of protocols and procedural issues were discussed...at the drivers meeting.
 

dirtslinger

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My class 11 car was only hit by one car. 19xx , imagine that...
I had moved as far to the left as humanly possible on a road easily wide enough for a Semi truck to pass me. He turned down on me before even clearing his back tire. Maybe he thought I was going to stop for him....?!. Kind of a donkey move in my book.
Looks like he may have cut a tire on my bumper that he tore up.
The area you were in, seemed big enough to park a semi sideways. Was a real bummer to see you there. I would have stopped but you were out of the car and waved or gave a thumbs up.
 

J Prich

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The driver meetings cut into their drinking time. Duh...
Plus there's not a lot of time to spare. Have to get everyone hyped up about the race they've already been hyped up about for months...and by the way, the check is already cashed so we're racing regardless of how much you sell us on it at the pep rally, LOL.
 

steve0we

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Good luck. No one is going to write a manual to this sport. And if they did not too many would read it. and if someone happened to read it they'd be scared to death of all the things that happen and wouldn't race.
Maybe the manual needs a pre-manual for just getting to and from the race in one piece! Maybe we can write it out of order like Star Wars.
 

Attachments

Crowd Pleaser

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How about the 2 identical, very bright/fluorescent orange UTV's that were towing their broken rig back to main down the race course in an area where there was no room to pass. We were behind them for a couple of minutes (in a Class 11) with the horn on, but they did not move. Luckily a Class 10 came up on us and had a loud siren so they moved and we were able to jump in behind and make the pass of the vehicles that should not have been on course towing. Lucky for us there was not another 10 car in the passing cars dust. No names, but I know who it was and they should know better.

We did see a lot of carnage, but not nearly as many warning triangles as I would like were used especially in the blind corners. As a racer that has had the unfortunate experience of breaking in a bad area I immediately go into keeping my car, the approaching cars and most of all my co-drivers safety as top priority by placing said triangles before even thinking about making repairs to the car.

Early into lap one we encountered a lot of cars/trucks/UTVs that would be broke and then a few minutes later they would be up our a$$ in a single track area with sirens blaring only to break and repeat.

No sour grapes here, but I for one am for safety and sharing the course. The OP has a good thought and perhaps a portion of all drivers meetings should be dedicated to the basics of off-road. It's tough to do at night especially when it's late, loud and some crews have been indulging in adult beverages all day.
 
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