spindles

JOSH

Well-Known Member
i need to build a spindle close to the one H&M built for there new ranger lift, What kind of spindle would be good to start with?

thanks
Josh
 

DougM

Well-Known Member
All the engineering has been done already. Why not just buy the spindles available from either Camburg or H&M?

By the time your done, you could have bought their stuff and been driving..

have fun!
 

JOSH

Well-Known Member
H&M will not sell the spindles alone, i didnt know camburg had spindles like that, ill look into it
 

Kritter

Krittro Campbell
not to discourage you , but if you are asking how thick the plate should be do you really trust yourself to build something that supports your truck?

Your profile says you are a CADD tech so I assume you have access to some good software. Design it first then run some calcs on the critical areas and you will see if your material selection is adequate. If you plan on doing the "lets just weld some [censored] together and hope it works" I would suggest buying some from a place that has already done that because then it's their ass if they fail.

Kris

"A signature always reveals a man's character -- and sometimes even his name. "
 

JOSH

Well-Known Member
i should but i'm lazy,why spend the time doing my on r&d when i can just ask, you tell me and i save myself the time. I could draw my own spindle, test it in millions of situations..the whole nine yards, but why when it has already been done?


but on the other hand my whole truck is "lets just weld some [censored] together and hope it works" so i might as well have the spindles to match.
 

Kritter

Krittro Campbell
"I could draw my own spindle, test it in millions of situations..the whole nine yards, but why when it has already been done?"

Why would somebody who did all the work to make a spindle want to reveal anything about their design? Especially when there are only a few makers of quality Ranger spindles.

As for being too lazy to to do the design work...we've all got our own vices I guess.

Kris

"A signature always reveals a man's character -- and sometimes even his name. "
 

rdc

- users no longer part of the rdc family -
I am assuming if you want those spindles you have an '98+ Ranger. Why not just keep the stock spindles. My brother is using stock ranger spindles on his toyota with a uni ball upper and a Stock Car Products lower ball joint and is getting 20". The spindles are beefy and you would save money and lots of time.
 

Kritter

Krittro Campbell
How wide are your brother's arms and what is the camber change from full droop to full compression?

Kris

"A signature always reveals a man's character -- and sometimes even his name. "
 

BradM

Well-Known Member
If you're that lazy, maybe you should find a new hobby. Something that doesn't require you to think too much.



"The only source of knowledge is experience." - Albert Einstein
 

JOSH

Well-Known Member
Wow, I thought this was the board where someone said there is no such thing as a stupid question, But from the look of your replies, this thread is starting to look like one of those on some import street racing chat (senseless [censored] talking)
Granted my reply about being lazy was not too smart.. but how hard would it be for one of you guys to throw a number up in the air??
 

FABRICATOR

Well-Known Member
.500" minimum, and have someone check the welds...

<font color=orange>The best ideas are the ones that look obvious to the casual observer.</font color=orange>
 

FABRICATOR

Well-Known Member
Josh,
Your questions were OK, although pretty specialized. It's your very lame response later that popped the balloon. A lot of these guys are willing to help out, but you need to show some effort on your part not laziness. You also need to give and get respect before most people will offer any help.

Spindles are a fairly ambitious project and require a lot of thought. Your best off buying them. But if you are determined to make your own, copy some good ones. I doubt anyone will tell you how thick to make them without knowing the design, your capabilities, and now, your determination.

<font color=orange>The best ideas are the ones that look obvious to the casual observer.</font color=orange>
 

JOSH

Well-Known Member
I apologize for my "lame" response. I respect everyone in here a great deal, especially people like you.
 

BradM

Well-Known Member
Keep in mind that the material thickness alone doesn't mean anything unless you also specify the material properties, the heat treatment, and all of the dimensions. If you have you have any kind of engineering background then that will make sense to you. If you don't then you really should buy spindles from someone who has done their "homework".

Keep in mind that not everyone engineers their parts. I have seen spindles produced by a well know and respected automotive aftermarket (off-road) company that were made based on rules of thumb and a best guess approach. In one particular case, they had a draftsman draw up the spindle in solidworks and then they ran it through a FEA (Finite Element Analysis) program for stress analysis. The problem is that no one from the company had an engineering background and therefore no one had a complete understanding of the forces acting on the spindle or the associated stresses. When they compared the FEA results with the material yield strength, they assumed that it would work. Long story short.... the prototypes failed on a truck that was street driven. CAD and FEA are neat tools but their results are meaningless if the operator lacks a thorough understanding of the subject area.

If nothing else, start with a simple design sketch. Then draw some free body diagrams and at least do some simple simple stress calculations based on maximum assumed loads in a static condition. Beyond that, you can start to consider combined loads, fatigue, impact loading, and other dynamic effects. If you take a few minutes to do put your equations into a spreadsheet, you can make the inputs variable (including material thickness). It really isn't that hard if you know what you are doing. What you will find is that everything is based on certain assumptions. Your forces acting on the spindle will all be based on assumptions. You should start by determining what forces are acting on the tire in different circumstances. Then consider how those forces are transferred to the hub, through the bearings, and then to the spindle. Don't overlook how the forces in the spindle are transferred through the ball joints to the a-arms. Also consider the braking forces acting on the spindle from the caliper mount.

If you didn't already realize it, your request was not trivial. I don't think you should expect anyone to give you that information for free. If they did, how do you know if it is true or how they determined their data? I have done it for other applications and I know what is involved. I wouldn't make it public knowledge just because you asked. Maybe you should consider an offer to purchase that information and then you can still have the satisfaction of building them for yourself.
 
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