Springs Are On!

fishd00d

What A Joke
Posts
15,502
Reaction
5,434
Well I got the 62" Deavers on and I am happy with the results so far....the truck only sits about 2in higher than before so thats good. And it cycles 18" with the 16" shocks being the limiting factor.

I used a 10" shackle mounted through the frame.

Here is the test video so far...when I used to do this the back tires would come off the ground only leaning about half this much:

<A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.pencilart.com/photo/piecesprings.wmv>http://www.pencilart.com/photo/piecesprings.wmv</A>


Look for test Jumping videos later today..

Go Big Or Go Home
United Jumping Truck Society
 

TRDshaunTRD

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,061
Reaction
0
from what i understand jason had the compition from the piece long b4 these 62's went on, now Jason has no hope what so ever! lol

"Those who risk nothing, are nothing."
 

rdc

- users no longer part of the rdc family -
Posts
5,788
Reaction
7
DAMM AUSTIN YOU ARE LIKE ME YOU ARE NEVER FAR FROM YOUR ICE CHEST I SEE I AM GLAD I AM NOT THE ONLY ONE
 

havahockey

Flipper
Posts
3,146
Reaction
724
Looks good Austin, you'll love them out on the dirt, it'll be a huge improvment over those Downey springs!

And Shaun..you're stock...so shhhh! :)

Race-Dezert Anonymous - Step #1:
"Hello, my name is Jason. And I'm a Race-Dezertaholic."
 

drtdevil93

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,769
Reaction
11
you can easily make that shock a 17" shock. right now there are 2-1" spacers inside. brett at king said he could remove one, giving an extra 1" of extension, without having to do anything else. look in to it.

erik
 

Eric_M

Well-Known Member
Posts
189
Reaction
1
austin is pulling 18" when the shocks drop out all the way. well, i never measured it but thats what he said when i was helping him with the final touches.

sand is for people who lack the skills needed to navigate objects
 

drtdevil93

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,769
Reaction
11
ya, removing that internal spacer will make the shock extend another inch. meaning like 19". another inch of droop.

erik
 

orvacian

Well-Known Member
Posts
420
Reaction
1
Those springs are realy helping you take pavement pounding to a new level! The cornering ability of your truck is truly astounding and astonishing, mabye even incredible and unbelievable!
 

Dillon

Well-Known Member
Posts
390
Reaction
0
yeah, those train track crossings shouldn't be a problem anymore lol
 

fishd00d

What A Joke
Posts
15,502
Reaction
5,434
Alright well the first weekend with them on was a learning experiance. The truck works bitchin! So much better then the 9" travel it had before.

I didn't have time to finish the shackles and so I went with just the 2 pieces of 1/4"....They worked great for a while but after the first day I noticed that they had hit the frame on the side and had bent them a little bit....this is caused due to the springs "duck walking"...

This is my question....I tightened the U-Bolts a lot and made sure they were staying tight, is there anything else I can do to keep them from moving side to side so much? Maybe make a upper wishbone or something? I guess Jason;s hit his frame also but they are ok because they are all gusseted.

Also I am going to get Delron bushings for the mount that goes through the frame on the top of the shackle..this should help out the side to side movement right? And I do not want to do both delron on the top and bottom mounts of the shackle right?

I am going to make another set and gusset them and put a brace between them. Will this work?

Thanks for any input.

Go Big Or Go Home
United Jumping Truck Society
 

partybarge_pilot

Well-Known Member
Posts
6,539
Reaction
1,362
Yes, delrin will help with the sway and rubbing problems. Let Me know if you need some made...
I saw you jumping at devils slide, looked a little soft on the compression valving.
 

fishd00d

What A Joke
Posts
15,502
Reaction
5,434
Looked soft in the front or back? I am going to get some tomorrow from Baja Concepts I think....

Go Big Or Go Home
United Jumping Truck Society
 

billymanfroy

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,654
Reaction
22
Austin,

A wishbone is the quickest & easiest way to eliminate the side-to-side with long springs/shackles. I'm in the same boat now and am just getting ready to start fabbing something (it's the off season). Mine cycles about 18" on jack stands, but I have yet to see a picture of it sagged out more than half way. Yours sounds and looks like it's cycling way farther than that, which will obviously make the problem worse. I don't think delrin bushings are going to help you that much, because the force and leverage on your axle sideways is a jillion times more than those things would be able to soak up. Beffier shackles prolly won't help much either, since their job is ONLY to hold the springs in an up/down motion. You shouldn't ever rely on them to locate the axle.

I've seen a lot of different setups, but as far as I can tell, you want to try and aim for a system that starts from the center of the hosing and spreads out to each frame rail. You'll get a lot of different opinions here, but I'd say you should make it the same length as your leafs from the axle to the forward spring eye. That is what determines your axles arc, so longer or shorter would theoretically make it bind up. On a coil-over setup, you'd ideally want it to swing on or near the same arc as your driveshaft. Of course, I've never done any of this yet, it's just what I THINK will work best for you. Anyone else have any thoughts?

Billy
 

motoxscott

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,240
Reaction
299
Austin,

Jason's Truck:

We used 3/16" delrin plates on either side of the frame so when the upper bushing does flex the shackles slide on the delrin rather than flexing even more and hitting the frame. So far that has seemed to work pretty good.

I was also thinking about going with a delrin upper bushing but I was concerned that would put more force on the actual mount and shackle. The poly bushing will flex a little to relieve that pressure rather than being so solid.

We'll see how this setup goes over the next 6 months to a year. I think he's had it on 3-4 runs so far including the D-Day event and so far so good.

-Scott
 

partybarge_pilot

Well-Known Member
Posts
6,539
Reaction
1,362
Rear.

A Y type top arm mentioned above would be the best solution. This also helps with axle wrap.
 

fishd00d

What A Joke
Posts
15,502
Reaction
5,434
Well thanks for the help guys...I think I will be making a wishbone Y type upper arm for it. This seems that it will solve and prevent a couple problems at one time.

Go Big Or Go Home
United Jumping Truck Society
 

JasonHutter

Well-Known Member
Posts
3,752
Reaction
266
Fish, I will see if I can get some pictures to you of ours on the race truck. We had some problems at first, but it is built pretty strong now and isn't breaking. You would be amazed how much force is put on those things when the truck duck walks. Ours on jack stands wanted to move the top of the diff about an inch and a half side to side if not more when it was articulated. All the mounts need to be strong also.

Jason
 

Curtis Guise

Administrator
Posts
12,453
Reaction
3,200
When a Nor Cal class 8 racer / Fabricator looked at the rear suspension on my race truck he said for leaf springs you don't want to use a Y type upper arm. The reason he told me is supposedly it will limit your travel and make it stiffer. The only thing about what he said that I kind of agree with is that it might make it stiffer when the suspension tries to articulate. For straight up and down travel with both wheels moving the same it should not make a difference. When only one wheel wants to go up or down the top of the axle housing will want to move to the side to allow the other wheel to go in the opposite direction (with leaf springs). But with an upper arm like that attached to one point of the housing and then to both frame rails it will not allow the top of the axle housing to move at all. So when one wheel hits a bump it will try to lift the other wheel up with it. So that could stiffen the ride because its compressing both springs instead of just one side. He said is the correct thing to use is one tube that connects to the top of the housing and the straight forward to a cross member on the frame. But then the only thing it limits is the axle wrap, not the duck walking you guys are talking about.
I guess what that fabricator was trying to say is that the duck walking needs to happen or it will make the suspension extremely stiffer. I don't know if I agree because my truck seems to work pretty good. But it makes some sense.

Are there any experienced fabricators that know how it should be done?
 

drtdevil93

Well-Known Member
Posts
1,769
Reaction
11
leaf springs dont travel in a perfect arc. an bar equal in length to the front of the spring will bind very quickly.
fish- i wouldnt do delrin in the upper mount. too much stress on the rear of the frame. a properly designed wishbone will not hinder travel and will not make it ride stiffer. it will eliminate wrap-up, side-side motion, increase rear bushing life, and reduce shackle stress. theres a trick on the toyotas. mine cycles 19.5 inches with the wishbone not being the limiting factor. after install i noticed a dramatic increase in cornering capability. the only question should be which direction to mount the heim: vertical or horizontal. there are arguments for both, i did mine vertical. why? i was brain-farting on a good method of mounting it horizontally. ive seen trucks done both ways, i dont believe there is much of a difference. a little bit stronger horizontal, but i havent seen a vertical one break. make sure you use a big heim. i used a 1 1/4". id love to post pics, but there are no driver combinations for my camera and my old computer (my newer one broke). if i can find a way i will post the pics. if you have time, bring it by the shop, id like to see how you did everything.

erik
 
Top