• Forum membership has its advantages....

Sway Away Big Bore shocks?

Stan

Well-Known Member
Just found out about them. Wondering if anyone around knows more about them.

"Rehabilitation begins at autopsy."
 

Jerry Zaiden

Well-Known Member
These shocks are going to be Truck / SUV specific like a Rancho. But kind of like a Bilstein or FOX 2.0 in quality. They will be around $100 each and so far they look like they will be the next big craze in the shock war. They have there own design with a really nice shaft. Maybe Goat 1 or 2 will coment on these shocks??
 

DougM

Well-Known Member
I think I'd take a Bilstein 5100 over those SAWs..
I saw one up close and they appear to be just like any other discount Monroe made (Rancho, Pro -Comp, etc.)
Except for the shiny anodized machined oil cover on top, I see no difference?
I will wait and see though before judgement
 

Attachments

Jerry Zaiden

Well-Known Member
Doug they are way nicer than that. These shocks will be awesome. I agree the Bilsteins are nice but these will have better quality parts; more billet.
 

Jack

Well-Known Member
If nothing else, they should be mono tube so you have a full 2" piston rather then a 1"5/8 like you have in rancho, procomp, monroe, and Bilstien 5100.
From what is sounds, it will be in the catagory of a Bilstien 7100 and I think there is a market for that, I would like to see it with a resivor just for ease of rebuild. (you don't have to be nearly as preciss on the amount of oil as w/o it)
 

Dylan

Well-Known Member
The typical Rancho, Monroe, ect shock is a twin tube shock. Twin tube shocks are prone to aeration because they are not under high pressure. They also have a much smaller piston because of the space taken up by the twin tube construction. Twin tube shocks are also less efficient at dissipating heat because the area between the tubes acts as insulation to hold heat in. They sometimes have the advantage of a shorter compressed length for a given stroke.
A mono tube shock is a more sophisticated, higher load capacity shock design. The mono tube design allows for a larger piston that can generate more force for a given pressure. Because the larger piston displaces more oil the shock can be tuned more accurately. A mono tube shock uses either a remote reservior or an internal floating piston. Bilstein 5100’s, Edelbrock IAS and Fox’s use an internal floating piston.
The knew Big Bore shock’s are mono tube internal floating piston shocks. So what’s the difference? ---

Piston size: full 2.000” bore, all others are actually 1.810” bore. 22% more piston area!

Shaft: 5/8” (nitro steel) shock shaft compared to ½” or .410”

Valving: they are not just built to fit a certain application they are also tuned for that application. Bilstein also does this but Big Bore shocks are aiming at the person who is a little more aggressive with there vehicle
 

Stan

Well-Known Member
So what it sounds like is a good quality, almost race-type shock that's an OEM replacment. Sounds like they may of hit on something. Maybe when I can afford it, what am I talking about, I need new front shocks now. Maybe I'll buy some and see how they are. Thanks for the info guys.

"Rehabilitation begins at autopsy."
 

Jimmy8

Well-Known Member
I also heard Sway a Way is coming out with a 4 inch to compete with the king kongs. Can anyone confirm?

"We've done so much with so little for so long, we can do anything with nothing!"
 

Donahoe

Well-Known Member
Sway-a-way has had 4" shocks for some time. It has been under development for a few years now. We had the protoype set on our class 8 truck in 1999.

NEVER LIFT!!!!!
 

Jack

Well-Known Member
Why don't we see some one develop for the desert what was on Mccacrens SODA truck with a full hydraulic suspension and not sping, Kinda taking the prencapal of the bumpstop and adding that roll to the shock and elemenating the spring. (also infenetly adjustable)
 

JasonHutter

Well-Known Member
It seems to me that you would have a huge problem with over heating the shocks if you were to develop something that would do both jobs of the shock and the spring. They are being used for a lot longer durations in the desert than in a short course race. I don't know exactly how they work, but I would think they would create a lot more friction inside while moving the fluid around. Just my .02!

Jason
 

martininsocal

Well-Known Member
jack-those are air over hydraulic shocks. not hydaulic. a hydraulic shock has no spring capacity and coannot support weight. fox has been building air shocks for years and some have attempted to apply them to racing. while they were somewhat succesful in short course circles, they were sporadic in the desert due to the expansion of the gas charge at different teperatures in an enclosed area. as the shock would heat up. the pressure would increase and the spring rate changes. made finding the right pressure for good handling hard at best. folks now use heater blankets and water jackets to try to maintain a constant temperature of the shock body to keep the spring the same. good ideas, just hard to implement in the field. martin

If your gonna go, go BIG
 

JoeB

Well-Known Member
I don't know exactly how MacCachren's shocks work, but whatever he's got, they work great!! That truck handles awesome. I know they are built by Nye Frank and cost a fortune. If you haven't seen them...try to find a look if at all possible. (attend a CORR race or something) I took pictures, but they are at the shop while I'm off to college. I'll email my friend and see if he can dig them out and email them to me. Very impressive.

JoeB
 

Mike_HKmtrsprts

Well-Known Member
Martin is right we used those shocks on our class 10 car they worked really well for playing around in the desert, but at about lap 3 it felt like your kidneys were trying to jump out of the car because the shocks would heat up and make the ride really stiff. we were going to run an onboard setup to ajust the shocks as we raced but the car got sold.
 

Donahoe

Well-Known Member
Nye Frank has been doing those shocks for years as well... THe problem with an (air spring) in the desert is heat... You tend to gain ride hight the hotter the shock gets.

NEVER LIFT!!!!!
 

JoeB

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the clarification Kreg. I understand the problems with them, but for short-course, they are a pretty neat setup. I'm still working on gathering pictures so everybody can see what we're talking about. It might be a few days though....if i can get them at all.

JoeB
 

Dylan

Well-Known Member
I don’t like air shocks regardless of the heat problem. They have way to much rising rate and very low rates in the majority of the travel that makes for terrible ride frequencies and response.

Maybe we should take this thread over to the shop??
 

Tim

Well-Known Member
Not that its totally related, but I had considered these shocks as one possiblity.
I was wondering what a good choice would be for am oem replacement shock. I currently have sway a way coilovers up front on my toyota tacoma and the front end is now plush relative to stock, but my back end kicks up on me when i hit the bumps.
Does anyone have any suggestions of an aftermarket shock that will be a little more plush and soke up the bumps without killing my broke student sized wallet?
(keep in mind I dont want to spend much over a bill)
 

RacerX

Well-Known Member
Air shocks must have a res. that comes off the bottom part of the can in order to work properly. The emulsion set up does not cut it. If air shocks are so terrible why does Rob McCachren beat everybody in CORR, and why do all the stadium buggies run air shocks over coil-overs. Yes granted air shocks create to much heat to be used in the desert. The trick set up is to have the air shocks water cooled. Thats just my opinion
 

martininsocal

Well-Known Member
wrong. the principle behind the air shock is that a gas can be compressed, a fluid cannot. by placing the resevoir at the bottom of the body, the increased air charge is at a less efficient position to react to the piston and shaft that are displacing the fluid and compressing the gas. it is like putting a spring horizontal to the plane of movement rather than vertically above it. gas pressure pushing downward against the piston/shaft is the most efficient use of the air spring concept.

If your gonna go, go BIG
 
Top