michael.gonzalez

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Before things get misinterpreted let’s clear some things up. Polaris has not paid me, or anyone at Race Dezert to post this article of the release new RZR Pro R. @Klaus and @Curtis Guise can confirm.

We posted it because we knew it would be of interest to our audience and members of RDC. We will most likely post a story on Robby Gordon’s SPEED UTV when a production model is ready.

In an effort to maintain transparency, Matlock racing is a client of mine via my company Dusty Summit not RDC they had paid me to produce content at the Baja 1000, that has nothing to do with this article or thread.

If we ever had paid features we mention in the beginning to maintain transparency such as the features I have written for onX Offroad.

That is all.😁
I appreciate the transparency!


I only hope for the same from Team Matlock with the front shock photos...
 

Jammminjay

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To confirm, Polaris did not pay us for the article @Jammminjay wrote. It should be obvious when we have a paying sponsor on race coverage or any other type of article or feature. Logo on the feature image, and/or banner at the top of the content, etc... Blacklake covered travel costs only as he mentioned. We had no idea what it was going to be before Jason got there...

We literally had no idea what it was. We took a huge chance going out there with a possibility it was vaporware. Turns out it was a really expensive cool truck with some incredible partners involved.
 

JerryB

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Before things get misinterpreted let’s clear some things up. Polaris has not paid me, or anyone at Race Dezert to post this article of the release new RZR Pro R. @Klaus and @Curtis Guise can confirm.

We posted it because we knew it would be of interest to our audience and members of RDC. We will most likely post a story on Robby Gordon’s SPEED UTV when a production model is ready.

In an effort to maintain transparency, Matlock racing is a client of mine via my company Dusty Summit not RDC they had paid me to produce content at the Baja 1000, that has nothing to do with this article or thread.

If we ever had paid features we mention in the beginning to maintain transparency such as the features I have written for onX Offroad.

That is all.😁
You forgot the part about I do/I don't have pictures of the broken shocks!
 

NIKAL

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Like to see them too, but I’ll bet they broke here:👇🏽
Correct me if I’m wrong, but that shock is not really in a double sheer when the shock itself is mounted on both sides of a center tab. It’s more balanced between a tab in the middle? In theory could the shock bolt be trying to rocking like a teeter totter in the middle tab? Also does that lower shock eyelet look like cast steel vs aluminum?
 

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michael.gonzalez

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It's all about column buckling.
That fork is susceptible to failure due to buckling. It really should be a forged piece at minimum with lots of material in the right spots.

Better material choice and better FEA-led design would improve it certainly.
 

Mxrider909

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the brenthals & kibbitech use this type of shock set up on their trailing arms, I can't imagine the forces those see is anything less than this new front terms of it not being in double sheer and what not. It does look like they might need to go back to the drawing board as far as material for that clevis though.. At least if the speculation about where the shock broke is true.
 

michael.gonzalez

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the brenthals & kibbitech use this type of shock set up on their trailing arms
Correct.

The design is not inherently bad. It just REQUIRES proper material choice and material placement.

It's not WHAT they did, it's HOW they did it...
 

10 shot

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the brenthals & kibbitech use this type of shock set up on their trailing arms, I can't imagine the forces those see is anything less than this new front terms of it not being in double sheer and what not. It does look like they might need to go back to the drawing board as far as material for that clevis though.. At least if the speculation about where the shock broke is true.
That's the thing ppl don't really know what part of the shock broke but assuming it was the Clevis that did.
 

10 shot

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Hence why we are asking for pictures so the RDC R&D team can make a full and thorough assessment .
Lol not sure you will get any pictures of that . No way Polaris or a sponsor driver or any sxs company will release a picture of a part failure on a pre production unit. Ask robby to show a pic of the exact parts that are failing on the speed car motor. Not happening and why would you. Pretty sure they will get it handled without the rdc crew! Lol
 

NIKAL

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“IF” the failure was at the lower clevis, I very much doubt Polaris will fix the issue. They will review it and if they have not broke any in the other testing, or if the failure rate is low. They will just move on. They will say it broke due to the abuse from racing and that supersedes what the consumer will use it for.

The reason I say this is Polaris, along with Fox have probably already produced 1000’s of this part. With the cost factor, and it’s been said Polaris really micro manages costs. With the cost to retool and re-manufacture, with lead times out 6 months or longer in some industries. With the Asia transit times, and port log jams. Polaris is not going to push out delivery of these vehicles anymore then they already have.

I was told they were originally going to release the Pro R last Oct, which got pushed into early 2021, which is now early 2022 for the R and Spring for the Turbo. Pressure to get these models out has caused Polaris to publicly announce them with an official release date. Polaris has never done this before. In the past, vehicles are on dealership floors and available within a few weeks of the release.

What Polaris will do is release it, and if enough failures come back, they will issue a recall. Once the stock is depleted or when the new model comes out and they will release a new part and claim 25% stronger suspension parts.

Meenwhile Fox & Shock Therapy will release an aftermarket part that fixes the problem.
 

EasyE

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IMO .. Best case it's the cast clevis that broke.. easy fix and the clevis is just weak link and the most unproven part of THIS particular set up.
Worst case, something else on the shock broke and it's due to the suspension design being flawed and putting stress on the shock somewhere else. Shocks don't just break 3x in a race so something would be really really off.
 

Total Loss

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“IF” the failure was at the lower clevis, I very much doubt Polaris will fix the issue. They will review it and if they have not broke any in the other testing, or if the failure rate is low. They will just move on. They will say it broke due to the abuse from racing and that supersedes what the consumer will use it for.

The reason I say this is Polaris, along with Fox have probably already produced 1000’s of this part. With the cost factor, and it’s been said Polaris really micro manages costs. With the cost to retool and re-manufacture, with lead times out 6 months or longer in some industries. With the Asia transit times, and port log jams. Polaris is not going to push out delivery of these vehicles anymore then they already have.

I was told they were originally going to release the Pro R last Oct, which got pushed into early 2021, which is now early 2022 for the R and Spring for the Turbo. Pressure to get these models out has caused Polaris to publicly announce them with an official release date. Polaris has never done this before. In the past, vehicles are on dealership floors and available within a few weeks of the release.

What Polaris will do is release it, and if enough failures come back, they will issue a recall. Once the stock is depleted or when the new model comes out and they will release a new part and claim 25% stronger suspension parts.

Meenwhile Fox & Shock Therapy will release an aftermarket part that fixes the problem.
Why I love engineers...cuz most here with any kind of hard off road or dezert race car experience would point at that as a weak link immediately....then the " engineer" would tell us we know nothing about this and they are the expert.
Speaking of experts....some arrogant high govt healthcare official comes to mind.

And Bert's has them right now for sale...probably already in Glamis.
 

Total Loss

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the brenthals & kibbitech use this type of shock set up on their trailing arms, I can't imagine the forces those see is anything less than this new front terms of it not being in double sheer and what not. It does look like they might need to go back to the drawing board as far as material for that clevis though.. At least if the speculation about where the shock broke is true.
Load on a rear trailing arm is mostly vertical on the spring/shock...front sees a lot of horizontal leverage load as it travels. No doubt not the right engineering tech term...but I'm winging it.
Agree with Nikal though...probably the connection point to the shock body...not the part...we will see as folks start hucking these things...
 

michael.gonzalez

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Load on a rear trailing arm is mostly vertical on the spring/shock...front sees a lot of horizontal leverage load as it travels. No doubt not the right engineering tech term...but I'm winging it.
Agree with Nikal though...probably the connection point to the shock body...not the part...we will see as folks start hucking these things...
The shock load directions are similar front to rear.

TBH, There aren't really any "horizontal loads".
The shock is a "2-force member". Meaning it can only be loaded at 2 points, (the two rod ends) and usually in compression.

Compression between the two points can lead to buckling. (imagine squeezing a plastic straw from two ends, it wants to bend in the middle, this is called buckling)

That's why thicker shock shafts are required: to avoid buckling under load (vertical load since the load can only be transferred between the 2 points)
 
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