Tim Staab update..again

DougM

Well-Known Member
In todays SD Union Tribune..

Off Road motorcycle champion Tim Staab of San Diego had surgery to remove a subdermal hematoma and releive pressure on the outer edge and the core of his brain. Staab was injured in a fall last December during a Best in the Desert race near Las Vegas.
 

PLS

Well-Known Member
The Union Tribune also had a comment the other day questioning whether Tim's accident and Cambell's earlier accident might be partially due to the lack of pre-running that is becoming more common at races now.
 

Ryno

Well-Known Member
Certainly not to point a finger, but also look at the CRF450 is a relatively new bike...Both Campbell and Staab had raced the XR650 for many years prior. I am sure they are both good with anything on two wheels, however after racing the XR for so many years, I would think the new MX like CRF is a bit of a change.

Ryno

Build it like a Rhino, and Leave it be.
 

AP255

Well-Known Member
Think about what company you are referring to. Honda's testing program is like no other. Their offraod team along with the motocross team have been involved with the development of the that bike for a very long time. They know that bike and have more hours on it that we can imagine. Honda's management wouldn't have it any other way. It is just very unfortunate that Tim and Johnny had bad racing accidents.
 

Waldo

Safehouse
If it is a lack of prerunning, like people are suggesting, then racers need to be more cautious and not take as many chances. It's extremely different when you are in a car/truck. If you Oh I failed spelling! in a car/truck, the consequences are not as detremental to your health as they are if you Oh I failed spelling on a motorcycle (in general, I know there are exceptions).

Also, we werent there...we don't know what happened. I can't say wether the bike was a factor or wasn't a factor in Tim's crash. Honda stated that there were no mechanical malfunctions with the CRF but you never know because the crash wasn't seen by anyone.

Hell, I have crashed tapped out in 5th gear back in the day. I rag-dolled so far I wish someone had a video camera. I got up with a couple of bruises, bruised bike, and not a single scratch on my helmet. On the other hand, I have also crashed prerunning a bomb run before a race and was only in 2nd gear. I thought I was being safe and checkin out my line. I broke my femur, tore ALL FOUR of my knee ligaments, broke two ribs, and had a concussion! I guess it just depends on how you land when you crash.

Godspeed you recovery Tim...hope to see you in the dez soon!!!

BRAAAAAAAAP!
 

Chris

Well-Known Member
I thought he was able to speak and making good time on the road to recovery. Those of you that are in the know what is a subdermal hematoma, what are it's effects, will he ever be able to ride again?
 

Waldo

Safehouse
I got this from a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) website. My stepfather had a TBI last year so I used this site for its information. It has everything you need to know about TBI's.

http://www.headinjury.com/library.htm#learn


Here is some other info:

SUBDURAL HEMATOMA

The brain is enclosed in the skull, which is a rigid, solid bone. Surrounding the brain is a tough, leathery outer covering called the dura (door-a). The dura attaches to the brain, just beneath the skull bone. The dura normally protects the brain and keeps it nourished with blood and spinal fluid. When a person receives a severe blow to the head, the brain bounces within the cavity. This movement of the brain structures may cause shearing or tearing of the blood vessels surrounding the brain. When the blood vessels tear, blood accumulates within the space between the brain and the dura. This is known as a subdural hematoma (sub-door-ul hem-a-to-ma), or blood clot in the brain.

When the blood accumulates between the dura and the brain, swelling of the brain occurs. There is no extra room within the skull to allow for the brain to swell and for the blood to accumulate. The only way the brain can compensate is to shift the delicate structures out of the way. This can cause pressure on vital functions, such as eye opening, speech, level of awakeness (or consciousness) or even breathing. Some subdural hematomas are small and can resolve on their own. Others, which may be larger or more severe, may cause serious problems and must be removed. The procedure of choice for removal of a subdural hematoma is surgery to remove the blood clot.

Causes

A subdural hematoma can happen to anyone, at any age. Some common
causes of subdural hematoma include: A blow to the head, such as in a motor vehicle crash, assault or bicycle accident. Falling down and striking the head

People at particular risk are those who:

Are elderly and have trouble walking or fall often
Take a blood thinner, such as Coumadin

Signs and symptoms

The signs and symptoms of a subdural hematoma include severe headache, dizziness, vomiting, increased size of one pupil or suddenweakness in an arm or leg. As the subdural hematoma swells and the brain structures are pushed together, more visible signs can occur. A more dangerous sign of subdural hematoma is a decreased level of consciousness, such as drowsiness, confusion or inability to awaken from a very deep sleep (often called coma). Because the brain controls all functions of the human body, breathing pattern changes also can occur. Shortness of breath, gasping for air or very slow breathing can be a warning sign that the person needs help. A subdural hematoma can be life-threatening; therefore, if any of these signs or symptoms occur, the person should be taken to a medical facility immediately.

Diagnostic tests

If your health-care provider suspects a subdural hematoma, the following tests may be ordered:

CT scan
This is a special X-ray image of the brain. The test is performed by having the patient lie on a flat X-ray table that slides into a round, open scanner. The X-ray images are taken as the patient is lying still on the X-ray table.

Treatment

The treatment for subdural hematoma depends upon the clinical signs and symptoms, as well as the size of the clot and area of the brain involved. Some hematomas can be watched over time to see if the blood clot will resolve on its own. These patients tend to have minor symptoms, which do not include any change in level of consciousness. For patients who show signs of brain compression (i.e. confusion, drowsiness or change in level of consciousness), the treatment of choice may be surgery to remove the clot. The surgery is performed by a neurosurgeon. The specific procedure, as well as the risks and benefits, should be discussed in detail by the neurosurgeon performing the procedure.

Questions you may want to ask

Where will the incision be, and how much hair will need to be shaved? Where will the person be after recovery (in the intensive care unit or stepdown unit)? How soon after surgery is the patient likely to wake up? Will the person need to be on a breathing machine (ventilator)? And if so, for how long? What are the complications of this type of surgery?

Recovery after surgery

After the blood clot has been removed, the patient generally is placed in the intensive care unit (ICU), where specially trained nurses can monitor closely the level of consciousness and any signs of complications. Often a ventilator (breathing machine) is needed until the patient wakes up enough to breathe on his or her own. Frequent assessments will be needed to determine the level of consciousness. Special medications may be given to reduce brain swelling and keep the pressure inside the head down to a normal level.

Visiting the patient in the intensive care unit can be frightening at first. The unit often is noisy and filled with machines and monitors. These monitors are used to closely watch the heart, blood pressure and pressure inside the head. The ventilator is used to help the patient breathe. Often the patient has several intravenous lines that deliver fluid and nutrition through veins. A dressing may be on the head to cover the surgical area. A tube may be in the nose or mouth to keep the stomach clear or to feed the patient.

Patients who have had a subdural hematoma often appear confused or combative. Some patients may need their hands restrained to keep from pulling out vital tubes, such as the breathing tube. It is important to ask the ICU nurses any questions to help understand the equipment and condition of the patient. To make sure all questions are answered, some families write down questions while waiting to see their loved one. Don't hesitate to ask - even if the question seems silly or you have asked it before.

Depending on the severity of the injury, some patients will require a rehabilitation program to regain their abilities. A uniquely trained team of rehabilitation specialists often includes nurses, physiatrists (rehabilitation doctors), neuropsychologists, speech therapists, physical therapists and occupational therapists.

It is important to keep in mind that recovery from a traumatic brain injury can be very slow. Sometimes several days can go by without seeing any major visible change. This is not unusual, and it is best to ask the health-care providers if any changes have occurred. It is also important to try to get enough rest and nutrition while waiting for the patient to recover. It is normal to feel frustrated, overwhelmed, lonely and worried. Sometimes a friend, or support group can help. Before your stress gets out of control, tell someone who can help.
BRAAAAAAAAP!<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by BajaWaldo on 04/19/02 10:08 AM (server time).</FONT></P>
 

Kritter

Krittro Campbell
I thought they were on XR 650s not CRFs. I didnt see any CRFs at contingency or tech. Hondas website says Staab was on a 650 and i am pretty sure Campbell was on a 650 also. Honda is pudihng the 450 as an MX bike not a desert bike.

www.honda.com

Kris

"A signature always reveals a man's character -- and sometimes even his name. "
 

Waldo

Safehouse
Staab was on a CRF450 when he crashed, it was their first dez race on that bike. Honda is using this bike for the more "technical" or tight race courses. Campbell and Hedgeveld have aldo raced it recently before Johnny crashed.

BRAAAAAAAAP!
 

Kritter

Krittro Campbell
They need to updaste their site then.

Kris

"A signature always reveals a man's character -- and sometimes even his name. "
 

Waldo

Safehouse
I used to check their site also but they rarley update the "Honda Riders" section.

BRAAAAAAAAP!
 

Vtr_Racing

Well-Known Member
I have to aggree, Honda does it right when they do things. Dont think it was the bikes fault and it seems just an unfortunate coincidence. Pre running is always nice and I think that some sort of pre running should be alowed. Course markings dont always stay where they are supposed to as we all know. Will keep Tim in my prayers and hope for a full recovery..
Marc

Speed Safely
 
I personally agree with Mr. Baja Waldo's first comment concerning the lack of pre-running issue. These guys r some of the best off road racers on 2 wheels. But they are trying just a bit too hard to win. Sure winning is everything to some people but dont go on blaming a promoter for not allowing pre-running.These pro racers have proven to be amongst the best and ultimately they are the ones who decide how fast to go.
We go desert racing and not pavement racing because of the added thrill of the terrain, not knowing whats coming up and so forth, course markings help point out dangerous sections, pre-running is great but not everyone can afford to do so, especially on the longer races. A non-pre-running race format levels the competion just a tad more. True , a know race course allows for safer race by having a better prepared racer/crew but hey, this is the frickin desert.
Best wishes and a speedy recovery to Tim and Johnny

victor fabian
<A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.stuck-throttle.com>www.stuck-throttle.com</A>
CARCO RACING 5-1600
 

Ryno

Well-Known Member
Dave-

Where can I get some of those stickers? I work in Newport Beach, live in Berdoo...let me know.

Waldo-

I definitely agree with you on the R&D issue with Honda, and time in the bike. I think maybe my mind is going towards the timing, and the fact that they were both on the new bike was consequence. All I have owned is Hondas....they never blow up, always run, and haul ass! =) I maintain my bikes well, but don't over do it either.

With Tim and Johnny, Godspeed them both...the red riders will be back! Carmichael is certainly making them proud on the MX track though. Just very unfortuante that two of the best riders I have seen on dirt have gone down within months of each other.

Ryno

Build it like a Rhino, and Leave it be.
 

pjc

Chairman
Johnny was on a 650. I saw him through Crystal and he is on the video we put on the 'net, He crashed a few miles later

Also, look for Andy Grider and Danny "Catus Balls" Cooper to make things happen with Honda.

PJCinLV
 

Waldo

Safehouse
Ryno - Did you see Carmichael Sat. nite with his "Scorpion King" gear and graphics? The black graphics looked alright! Also, did you hear that Nathan Ramsey "NateDog" won the main 4/14 on a CRF 450 after Carmichael did an Evil Kinevil off a double? Notch another one up for Honda.

BRAAAAAAAAP!
 
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