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Tire Question

fishd00d

What A Joke
I need your guys thoughts on this.

I have always heard that when you run a radial tire that when you rotate them you must keep the tire on the same side of the truck. For Example: If the tire is on the Right Rear you can only move it to the Right Front. Am I correct on this or can you put tires from the right side on to the left side?



Go Big Or Go Home
 

evan_clanin

Well-Known Member
there are a lot of theories in the radial tire rotation..but normaly you would rotate fron to back...dont worrie about crossing them..
 

poolman

Well-Known Member
Ive heard that that isn't the way to do it anymore.Somebody out there must know.

poolman
 

BIG_FAT_LOSER

Well-Known Member
I beleive if you take a right hand tire, black wall out and remount on the left, whitwall out keeping the same rotation it will be fine. I do it on my cars due to s****y alignment. But I think reversing tire rotation is no longer a big deal anymore.

<font color=red>PAT KAPKO</font color=red>
 

rdc

- users no longer part of the rdc family -
I work for America's Tire Co. and I can tell you for sure that you can and should rotate radial tires from L to R. We do it on every vehicle that comes in...(except directional tires/wheels etc)...not rotating side to side is OLD SCHOOL and outdated. a good rotation pattern is crossing the fronts to the rear, and moving rears straight forward. that way after a couple rotations, each tire will have been at all four corners...this is especially good for lifted trucks which ofcourse don't always have good alignment...and mud terrains, which get all cupped if not rotated and balanced often.

oh yeah, and just my opinion, don't be lame and want your big old mud terrains balanced with no weights on the outside because you don't like the weights to show and then complain that they're not balanced well or wearing funny. okay sorry. I'm done now.
 

John Bitting

Administrator
Jdogg, it has been my bad experiences with bushes and rocks ripping off weights that are mounted on the outside of the rim. I could care about looks but it is no fun driving 2 hours home on the freeway after you lost all the weights after chasing a race. Just a thought, Not everything is done for looks...
 

rdc

- users no longer part of the rdc family -
okay, I agree...that's was more aimed toward the general public than real off-roaders...but when tires are getting chewed up on rocks and such they'll never stay very in balance anyway and a static balance is just groovy...
 

Crayfish

Well-Known Member
As far as the balancing goes don't even worry about it on 32" tires and larger. As the diameter gets bigger the amount of weight needed at the rim to make it balance properly is obnoxious. You start losing those weights at high speed and people driving next to you on the freeway are in danger. I was told from two different tire shops that weights on larger tires are a waste of time. Larger tires also rotate alot slower than smaller tires so balancing isn't that important.

Just what I have heard.
 

Junior

Well-Known Member
I was traveling at highway speed one evening coming back from San Diego with the window down and my arm out the window when the drivers front tire threw the outside weight. That weight smacked my elbow so hard I almost wrecked. My elbow was swollen for a week. No more weights on the outside anymore! I am also of the opinion that if the tire shop must use large weights both inside and out in order to obtain balance they should remove the tire and try another one. Twice I have insisted on this which has solved the problem.


Junior
EJR Racing #244
 

rdc

- users no longer part of the rdc family -
I have 32" on my truck currently and you need to balance them!!! Trust me. I have gone in several times to get them re-balanced and you can feel the difference big time! And it doesn't take tons of wieght unless the tire is bad. I have always had them use stick on wieghts on the inside and have never had problem,

Tony
 

Crayfish

Well-Known Member
Another thing is worth mentioning, there is a system that they use on big rig tires to balance them and I am sure it will work on off-road setups. Someone makes an attachment that goes on the valve stem and allows you to inject a powdered plastic material into the tire. The plastic material self-balances as you drive. The rotational inertia forces the plastic to the inner walls of the tire and for some reason causes it to balance.
I can't remember what the stuff is called but I read an article about it around a year ago. If anyone has any info on this it might be the way to go.
 

rdc

- users no longer part of the rdc family -
I was just curious...how many of you guys that race sipe your tires? I know it works good for wet conditions on pavement and such, but how bout high speed in the dirt??? thanks, Jaron
 

scott

Well-Known Member
Fish-- My pops worked for BFGoodrich for 26 years, and he told me that when you run your tires for a period of time, your tires normally will create a wear pattern, meaning that the tire will scalip somewhat, and thats due to the rotation the tire is going. Thats why they tell you to go from front to back. If you start criss-crossing where basically your left side tires are now on your right, you have a chance of tread seperation, which equals to tire failure, aka,(firestone).... Basically the tire builds up more heat......... due to the uneven wear which it can come apart. He retired in 1979, and he told me with the different compounds today, you can probably get away with it ( criss-crossing). Technology Rules don't it ??????
 
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