toyota alternator setup

drtdevil93

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im looking for some more juice in the charging system, and was wondering what other toyota guys were doing to beef it up. the only thing i can think of is to get the high-output one from downey. its 110 amps vs. 60stock. just wondering if anyone had a better idea. different wiring wouldnt be a problem, i already stripped every last wire out of the truck.

erik
 

Eric_M

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i would say get a higher out-put one. im sure that isnt the only way to get the job done but i would say its the simplest and easiest way i know of doing it. let me know how it turns out though, i might be doing the same thing with my truck as soon as i get everything set on it.

sand is for people who lack the skills to navigate objects
 

YotaWhoopRunner

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I remember some toyota guys doing a swap with an alternator from an mr2 a while ago. It'll probably come up on off-road.com if you do a search.
 

rdc

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THERE IS A COMPANY CALLED POWERMASTER THAT SELLS THE I THINK 4 WHEEL PARTS CARRIES THAT BRAND I WOULD CHECK THEM OUT
 

ntsqd

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Powermaster offers a 170 amp unit. They may or may not be a direct swap. Read: "Some fabrication of mounts may be required." I seem to recall the MR2 alt has some mounting issues and not just any MR2 alt is a good candidate for the swap. The ORC Yota list just had a thread on that topic.

TS

I used swerve around my halucinations, now I drive right thru them.
 

michael_loomis

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keep in mind that the higher the output of the alternator , the harder it is on your battery.
 

drtdevil93

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well i think i just had some wiring problems before, cause last time i had the truck out, the voltage was getting really low (10.5-11) with the 2 hellas and electric fan going. but i rewired the entire truck and now it stays right about 13.5-14 volts loaded or not. i might still need to add it later. im afraid of doing any fabrication when belt alignment comes into play. my brother-in-law apparently has an alternator rebuilding business, im gonna see if he can just change the winding ratio without screwing anything else up. thanks for the ideas.

erik
 

michael_loomis

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kevin , its really a combination of things that are hard on the battery , but all that current leaving the alternator goes directly to the battery , which will cause the battery to "boil" . you are literally burning up the plates in the battery. any alternator obviously could do this , just depends on the amp draw on your electrical system .
 

ntsqd

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Maybe I misunderstand things, but if the voltage regulator is doing it's job the battery shouldn't ever 'boil.' As the battery's voltage comes up to the voltage regulator's limit, the alt can no longer 'force' more current into the battery. So the regulator tapers off the excitation voltage until, theoretically, the alt is freewheeling because the battery can do all of the work.
The 'boiled' batteries I've seen were caused by one of two things or the combo of both, voltage regulator malfunction or old battery with low internal resistance (usually shorted plates).
So I see a large charging current capable alternator sort of like having a big fuel tank. You may not always need to use it, but it's handy to have when you do need it.
The general trend in late models is away from big batteries and towards high current capable alternators as one way to save weight. They size the battery just big enough to start the car, plus some Factor of Safety, and size the alternator to handle most of the draws.

TS

I used swerve around my halucinations, now I drive right thru them.
 

michael_loomis

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Thom .... the current (amps) going into the battery varies depending on the load being pulled from the battery , if all my lights , stereo , etc are pulling 60 amps then my alt. is trying to fulfill that requirement. sure the regulator keeps the voltage in the correctly range , but the hi input of amps take their toll.

look at most automotive battery chargers for instance , most have 3 selections, 2amp trickle , 10amp and a 50amp . 50 amp is for jumpstarting only due to the harm caused to the battery.

yacht's use auto switching chargers which usually trickle a small 2 or 3 amp charge , but will cycle every so often and jump up to 40 or 50 amps to intentionally burn the "dirty" surface off the batteries plates . it only remains there for a brief time though because the plates would begin to deteriorate.
 

ntsqd

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The alt's voltage regulator looks at battery voltage and compares that to the preset upper voltage limit. It varies the field's excitation voltage in direct relation to the differential voltage (difference btwn the limit voltage and the present system voltage)(DV). The excitation voltage directly controls the alt's output current. So if the DV is low, the current output is low. If the DV is high, the current output is high.
The battery is in parallel to all of the various loads on a vehicle, not in series with them. The alt's current output does not have to go thru the battery to get anywhere else.
You'll get no argument from me that high current charging will get things like the batttery and the cables/wires warm. However, just because alt is rated for XX Amps does not mean that it always puts out that many Amps. It does mean that at maximum excitation voltage ("Full Field") it can or should put out that much current.

TS

I used swerve around my halucinations, now I drive right thru them.
 
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