Trigger Welding

MH20

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I've been seeing more and more "Trigger Welding" (series of spot welds) around and was just wondering the professional opinion on it. I've played around with it a little bit and it looks good and I seem to get enough penetration, but are there any advantages or side effects? Should it only be used for certain applications or metal thicknesses?
 

ntsqd

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Where are you seeing it used ?
Control arms ?
Body seams ?
Fab'd dashes ?
 

ESE_DIEZ

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I have been told that its as strong as a continuous bead but others have said the exact opposite. I am a welder and we do production type welds that are continuous beads mainly for speed(as fast as we can weld em and still be within a 10th of an inch), but as far as what is stronger, I would like to know this too.
 

JCampbell

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MH20,I 've been asked this more times than i can count and my true answer is that the welds are plenty strong . I've built alot of cars out of Penhall's and have yet to have a weld crack or break under normal racing conditions ,A few of the cars we've built have been wrecked in the past and never have seen any real failures in the qualitiy of the welds. If you have the welder set on proper heat and wire speed settings the trigger weld will penetrate as good as a continuous pattern weld.Plus trigger welds look PRETTY! I do mig most of our chasiss mainly because of the time and cost it would be to tig a complete chasiss.Usually I tig all steering,susp,and most of the detailed parts of the car
JAMIE CAMPBELL PENHALL FAB
 
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Thanks Jamie, thats the response I was looking for.

Anyone else have opinions on the subject?
 

dezerts10

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isnt is awsome how the person who would know the most about a particular situation can respond to the matter. All thanks to RDC. awsome job klaus john and the other guys who brought us RDC thanks

Gregg

p.s. thanks fish for not banning me cause i for got to put your name in the original post
 

motoxscott

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With the knowledge and experiance that Jamie has I wouldnt question his trigger welds. If he says they will hold, they will. The average garage fab'er I would NOT trust as most wouldn't know if they had a cold weld or had enough penetration. The thing is you don't need to trigger weld to get that same type of bead pattern. Their are times you need to trigger it, but I personally woudn't do it unless the need arises.

Total Chaos and Camburg do some of the best MIG welding I've seen and they never lift.


-Scott
 

Jkrell

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in agreement with what Jamie said about the cars built at penhalls shop, both the 4 seater and the class one car we recently built at Robby Gordons were "trigger welded" chassis. I was skeptical at first but a crash in the class one car at the 1000 made me a believer. The main cage didn't take that hard a hit but the right rear corner took a really hard direct hit pushing the rear trailing arm directly into its inner pivot mount. Rather than ripping the weld off that it was putting a direct load on in mushroomed the tube in and the weld held. I didn't think it would have held...but apparently, like jamie said, if wire speed and heat settings are set correctly "trigger welding" can be as strong as a consistent bead and it does look pretty.

Jon
 

dadomin8r

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anyone have some close-up pictures or a different link than the one above (the link above says that the band width is expired)?
 

1992f150

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I think they are talking about, what some people call "fish scale". Insted of welding a continuous bead, the gun trigger is pressed and a weld pool started, then you let go of the trigger and stop the weld, then repeat. So the result is abunch of start-stop welds all stacked up in a chain.
 

motoxscott

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You don't have to trigger weld to have welds that look like this. It's all how you use the gun. This doesnt look trigger welded because the puddles/ripples are closer together.

allstar-005.jpg


This one looks trigger welded because the dot in each puddle where the wire pulled out when he shut it off.

allstar-007.jpg


Trigger welding should be left with experianced welders, not beginners as if it's not done right it will be junk and fail. The welder who did both of these knows what he's doing.

-Scott
 
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