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Ultimate Tube Notcher

Klaus

Administrator
There are multiple ways to notch a tube. One easy one is with the Ultimate Tube Notcher by Mittler Bros available from Tricktools.com . The machine notches very effortless and we use it at the Wizard School of Fabrication.



 

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KELLENC

Well-Known Member
Klaus, do you know what the retail price is? what kind of angles they can notch? I like end mill notchers but, all of the other ones I have seen are way too much $$.
 

ntsqd

Well-Known Member
Because then you have either of those tools tied up with the notching set-up.

Granted, at $3500 it's not for everyone. After seeing it in use I think I'd rather have a belt sander type notcher anyway.
 

partybarge_pilot

Well-Known Member
The sander ones are nice becuase you can free hand some wierd cuts. I don't think I would try that with an end mill......
 

Curtis Guise

Administrator
if I had the money I would get that or a belt sander type in a second. But for those on a tight budget this is what worked for me http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=42324

$50 and I built my T100 with it. It still works fine but the bushing has some slop in it. I clamped it in a vise instead of on a drill press. It worked 1000 times better than using a grinder like I did 10 years ago building my race truck....
 

ntsqd

Well-Known Member
amrein1743 said:
What's the life span of the end mill and what does it cost to replace it?
A good roughing end mill like that shown in the pic can easily be over $100 and could push $200 pretty hard. With care though it's life span would be nearly unlimited. Buying another would be more a case of needing a different diameter than replacing a worn one.

A qwik search of msc-direct found these in 1-3/4":

http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNSRIT?PMPXNO=2139305&PMT4NO=0 ~$315

http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNSRIT?PMPXNO=1692770&PMT4NO=0 ~$90
 

hoeker

Well-Known Member
when i priced that end mill i found them for 200, mittler sells them for 250. i then went to ebay and paid 20$.

FWIW, if i had the floor space i'd recommend spending 3500 on a used bridgeport first. if the bridgeport get's backed up with work i'd consider a tube notcher but then i'd probably just buy another bridgeport. why buy a dedicated tool when for the same money you can get one of the most flexible tools ever made??

i notch all my tube on my bridgeport with a hole saw and have recently bought everything i need to use my horizontal mill to notch tube with an end mill like that notcher.
 

jesusgatos

Well-Known Member
I liked using Denunzio's MB end-mill notcher and I've worked in a shop where we used vertical mills to notch tubing, but I wouldn't give up my JMR hole-saw notcher. It notches tubing just as quickly and accurately, but its smaller and much less expensive. I abso-freakin-lutely love it. Oh, and for what it's worth, JD2 is also going to be releasing a couple of higher-end hole-saw notchers within the next few weeks.
 

scary fast hummer

Well-Known Member
Curtis_Guise said:
if I had the money I would get that or a belt sander type in a second. But for those on a tight budget this is what worked for me http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=42324

$50 and I built my T100 with it. It still works fine but the bushing has some slop in it. I clamped it in a vise instead of on a drill press. It worked 1000 times better than using a grinder like I did 10 years ago building my race truck....

I used a little higher quaility unit that cost just a little more from M-Tech and built my cage for my H1 Hummer with it. If this knuckle dragger can get it right, anybody can!
 

Superfab

Well-Known Member
Hoeker hit it on the head.. a used bridgeport can be had at auctions for as little as $1300. We notch everything on it. I have a whole rack of holesaws with 1/2" arbors made out of bolts installed into them. For the 5/8" thread holesaws I turn the shank to 1/2" so you never have to change the collet. The nice part is you can easily do an offset cope in a tube and everything is held nice and solid. The mill is handy for making brackets and hole sawing odd parts. Put a wood 4x4 in the vice and you can clamp sheetmetal or plate to it and saw holes without risking your digits. Best multi-use tool a shop can have. Most don't have a budget for a lot of equipment so make the best of it.
 

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ACID_RAIN28

Well-Known Member
For about $3500 you could get a 20" apex, bench grinder, chop saw and band saw, I have found that combo faster and more versital, than especially the holesaw notcher. But if you were doing production fits and stuff it would be such a time saver!!
 

amrein1743

Well-Known Member
We use belt sander type notchers at work and I think they are the best style notcher for production besides a 6 axis laser "notcher" which isn't too cost effective until you start running 1000's of parts.

I also like the belt notchers for custom work because if you need to remove a little more material you can, versus a hole saw notcher where if you don't get the notch perfect, it's a little more challenging to remove more material.

Chris
 

irishprerunner

Well-Known Member
I use one of the endmill notchers on a daily basis. there is no way a holesaw notcher is just as fast. they are expensive but they take up a lot less room than a belt sander type notcher. once you learn to use them and what they are capable of there are endless things you can do with them. they work great as holesaws if you need a big hole in some plate. another anvantage of this type vs. a sander one is the heat, you can notch it then grab it with your bare hand...you can't say that with a sander type. there is not as big of a mess either, sure there is a mess but it is in bigger pcs... no fine metal dust.

all in all i would not trade for any other kind

oh ya. the bits are faster to change than a belt sander
 

wrightracing.net

Well-Known Member
I use one of the endmill notchers on a daily basis. there is no way a holesaw notcher is just as fast. they are expensive but they take up a lot less room than a belt sander type notcher. once you learn to use them and what they are capable of there are endless things you can do with them. they work great as holesaws if you need a big hole in some plate. another anvantage of this type vs. a sander one is the heat, you can notch it then grab it with your bare hand...you can't say that with a sander type. there is not as big of a mess either, sure there is a mess but it is in bigger pcs... no fine metal dust.

all in all i would not trade for any other kind

oh ya. the bits are faster to change than a belt sander
My question is if I buy a vertical mill could it be setup to notch tubing. That way I would get more use out of one tool? I have a hole saw notcher and I want a better way without spending $3500 on a single use tool. I am still on a budget until I start making Trophy trucks Ha ha:D .
 
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