Ups and Downs of coilover setups

schafer

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Ok this recently was posted to another board, im wondering of some of the pros here can determine if this is correct or if it goes by a different principle..


"Ive heard its best to have a soft coil and a stiff shock makes the best ride for single coilovers. Supposibly the soft coil absorbs the small bumps and road imperfections, and the stiff shock keeps you from bottoming out in the bigger whoops and drop offs. "

Corey Schafer
tmcorey@ttora-socal.com
 

cleartoy

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I think that is someone trying to cover all bases with little cash out lay.

Id rather have a soft spring and stiff shock than the other way around.

However my opinion is its best to have a dual rate coil over setup with soft and stif coils, and the shock valved right.

94 Toyota stdcab 2x4
99 Yamaha YZ250

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curt

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Depends on what your doing I guess, the problem with a stiff shock is it develops heat and loses efficiency. Just like hot oil flows easier than cold oil because it thins out, it will no long resist the valving as well which creates "shock fade" meaning they just don't work anymore or worse hydraulic locks (rancho 9000's) on you becoming one long solid shaft of metal that won't go in or out. The hydraulic locking usually won't be a problem for more than a bump or two as it will self clear along with a piece of frame mount or two.
The purpose of a spring is to create ride height and provide compression resistance, the purpose of a shock is to dampen(control the speed) the action of the suspension. Dual rate coilovers provide what your looking for, a short soft spring for the little bumps and a longer stiffer spring for the medium and "OH MY GOD" bumps. Since its cheaper to change shock valving than springs people have a tendency to stiffen up the shock instead of going the trial and error route of changing springs. I'd call King or Sway-A-Way and get an opinion or 3, be prepared to have overall and corner weights, ride heights, and mounting angles to get a proper starting point for your journey. Curt

VORRA Class 7
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