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Wayne Lugo's Mark Newhan built Trophy Truck feature

T.martin

Active Member
#2
Good looking truck. It appears that the discriminator valve is not in the correct orientation. That looks like the Harmon -12 version. There is no way that thing will flow enough air to fast fill a TT tank. I wouldn't mention it, but it is a safety problem.

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Mark Newhan

Well-Known Member
#3
Good eye. This truck will have an even smaller dicriminator valve shortly. We actually use either a -8 or -6 inline style. They are omnidirectional. This truck uses a dual red head fueling probe. On any Trophy Truck I’m involved with, we send the fuel vapor away from the vehicle and back to the supply tank, so the small inline discriminator valve is only to allow air into the tank to keep in from imploding as the fuel is used.
 

bullnerd

Well-Known Member
#4
Beautiful racecar and great pics and video too!

I have a question. What's the advantage of this style rear sway bar versus the more common style we've been seeing?
 

Mark Newhan

Well-Known Member
#5
Beautiful racecar and great pics and video too!

I have a question. What's the advantage of this style rear sway bar versus the more common style we've been seeing?
No advantage in particular. It’s really about packaging on some vehicles. These types of sway bars are fabricated from 4130. As such they are good for about a season on a race truck (the bad). I like how they apply the sway control to the chassis. The energy is distributed through the trailing arms at a low center of gravity (the good)
 

Anger Issues

Well-Known Member
#9
I always admire (from afar, and with lots of jealousy) Mark's amazing work and his efforts with Steve "O"'s rigs. This one is almost too beautiful to take off road!
Coincidentally I'm wearing my Lugo/Olliges Racing hat. Time to check those lotto tickets (again). Great rig.
 
#11
i mite have to look into this style of sway bar on my truck, due to package constraints. Great work mark looks killer
I have the same setup on my T100. Mark bent the tubes for it and a couple friends prerunners years ago. It's a simple and clean setup that works great but it does sway a little more than it did on the street than when I had a traditional sway bar with long arms before. The other problem I've had is stress cracks on the stitch welds where the tube goes into the arm at the ends. Mark has tig welded it twice and another friend did once or twice also. Seems to happen every couple thousand miles or so depending on how many hard miles in the dirt. For some reason my truck has had the problem allot more than the other trucks. I was thinking maybe because mine is a 4 link and theirs is a 3 link. Maybe the articulation of the 4 link is harder on it. Just a thought I had and maybe @Mark Newhan would agree or disagree on that.
 

McCredie A

Well-Known Member
#12
I had the same set up on a 4 link truck. It cracked once over 8K miles. Mostly dirt. I never had the traditional set up to compare it to. Great job Mark. Your vehicles always come out nice.
 
#14
I was thinking maybe because mine is a 4 link and theirs is a 3 link. Maybe the articulation of the 4 link is harder on it.
3 links due articulate clearer than 4 links. Are your lower links mounted off the front of the axle or strait down?

If it comes down to having the sway bar be sprung or unsprung weight, I would choose sprung every time.
 
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