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Weatherpack relay.

redmist

Well-Known Member
#1
I'm currently running a VF28 relay in my Jimco, however it's discontunued and I'm about to wire a new Tatum. Wondered what everyone was using in terms of a weatherpack or other weather sealed connector relay?
 

mpower

Well-Known Member
#2
ive been using the hella weatherproof relays for some years now. the ends are already terminated so i solder the wires together. But i wish i could find them as a kit, non-terminated so i dont have to solder wires together.
 

mpower

Well-Known Member
#4
nice! thanks for the link . i knew they were around but could never find them..
 
#6
This is a good one to use as they are inexpensive & work great! I used them on my engine rewire job:
sealed relay kit

this is a decent relay, but there is a newer, and better alternative.

first, in thepicture above, it clearly shows "small" connection pins. the newer style uses a larger .25" connection for the power in/out (terminals 30 and 87).

the amperage rating is the same for the older and the newer style. BUT, i am seeing an unacceptible failure rate on the older small terminal style, the connections are melting, even when used well under the rated amperage load.

this is the better alternative, for under $20, and you can clearly see the larger contacts and better silicone seal.


keep in mind, vibration is also a killer of relays, they are simply a set of "points" that open and close via an elctro-magnet. my recomendation for maximum life is to mount them all together on a panel and use rubber isolation mounts
 

mpower

Well-Known Member
#7
ive seen quite a few failures in smaller hella relays over the years as well. so much that i have tried to stay away from using them altogether. this changed the way i wired vehicles and i am now much happier with my wiring jobs.


i started using cooper bussman power relay modules about a year or so ago. Link here: power relay module .
The price isnt bad and they have been used on heavy equipment for some years now. the signal connectors can be purchased at the chevy dealer or online and there are different configurations available like sealed power connectors instead of studs. but the link posted is the best all around unit available. its been a great product for wiring prerunners, play vehicles and adding on circuits to newer vehicles. if theres an issue the terminals can be jumped very quickly and its great for high current loads.

anybody else been using these?
 
#9
this is what happens to the "small" terminal relays.

you can see the socket melted from heat. this was a fuel pump relay. the poor connection caused the pump to run erradic and leaned out an engine.........
you can see on the relay where the pin was black and beinging to melt into the case, all from a single 044 fuel pump that should pull about 7amps of power.
 

Attachments

#10
Im just trying to better understand good wiring technique, do you guys use relays and breakers or if you use a resettable breaker are relays not needed?

thanks
 
#11
Im just trying to better understand good wiring technique, do you guys use relays and breakers or if you use a resettable breaker are relays not needed?

thanks
they serve two entirely different functions.

a "breaker" (no different than a fuse) is a circuit protection and current limiting device. its sole purpose is to protec an electrical circuit from an overload condition. this results in a build up of heat in a circuit, to the point where a fire is a possibility.

a relay is basically a switch. thats it. it used when a switch doesnt have the "capacity" or rated load capability of the circuit design. think of it this way, you want to run 8 high power lights off one switch. if each light pulls 10 amps, thats an 80amp load. "Good" switches are about 20 amps. so you install multiple relays that all connect to one switch. you can run small 20ga wires to the switch, and heavy wire in/out of the relay for the lights. so in a nutshell, a relay is a switching device that uses minute power from a switch to engage a high current load. a switch that turns on a switch.
 

nexrace

Well-Known Member
#15
ive seen quite a few failures in smaller hella relays over the years as well. so much that i have tried to stay away from using them altogether. this changed the way i wired vehicles and i am now much happier with my wiring jobs.


i started using cooper bussman power relay modules about a year or so ago. Link here: power relay module .
The price isnt bad and they have been used on heavy equipment for some years now. the signal connectors can be purchased at the chevy dealer or online and there are different configurations available like sealed power connectors instead of studs. but the link posted is the best all around unit available. its been a great product for wiring prerunners, play vehicles and adding on circuits to newer vehicles. if theres an issue the terminals can be jumped very quickly and its great for high current loads.

anybody else been using these?
I have been using these with good luck. I like how stout they are.
 

burninfuel

Well-Known Member
#16
the amperage rating is the same for the older and the newer style. BUT, i am seeing an unacceptible failure rate on the older small terminal style, the connections are melting, even when used well under the rated amperage load.
I have had spade connectors heat up on high load relays. Per Popular Mechanics mag. add slight amount to spade a copper antisiez and "Don't over do it. fills and makes 300% connection.
I did this on a relay supplying power to a 120v 3/4 hp pump. years later still no sign of damage

]
 
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