Welders

dezerts10

BANG!! BANG!!
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I am going to be starting some welding classes at the JC in a little while and i was thinking about buying a mig welder. Does anyone recomend any specific welder that i might want to lookin to buying. I am planning on using it for things like roll cages and bumpers and stuff like that. Also, i dont want to have to run any new wiring cause i would like to use regular house voltages. I know i could but is that recamended? Or, should i get a 220 volt welder? thanks for the help.

Gregg
 

singlehanded

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I took two classes at fullertonjc, teacher was Bob Sadler. He is a real cool teacher. I bought a lincoln 200 mig about a year ago and it runs off 220/230so we had to get a plug wired to our garage. I bought a big one just because I didnt want to have something that was to small in the future making equal length beams ect. and have to get a bigger one . I can now buy a 110 flux core mig at harbor freight for about $150 -$250 when they are onsale and use it on small jobs annd bring it to glamis and races. I think camcurg uses the 200 lincoln and if it big enough for them I sure it big enough for home fab. I think I paid aroud $1200-$1300 for it. Really all depends on the amout of cash you can invest in a welder.

local
 

1992f150

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Warning, Shameless plug:
I would strongly recomend taking welding classes at Mt San Antonio College (in Walnut) if its in your area. They have one of the best welding programs in California, with several state titles won by their welders at the Skills VICA competition. This year the 5 students who competed received four 1st places and one third place in their own categories out of the entire state of california.
The actual welding lab has many different tools and welding machines. Roughly, Id say they have about 14 tig, +20 stick, 4 fluxcore, and 10 mig machines. They also have at least 30 oxy acetylene setups, 2 track burners, 2 plasma cutters, an ironworker, 2 hydraulic metal shears, grinders, a sheet metal brake, and most importantly a tube bender ;)
If your going to take classes, try to get either Ben Eisley, Junior Hernandez, or John Rigehti. They are all great instructors. (get Junior to tig weld something for you he is like a robot)

Azusa: shame of the foothills
 

motoxscott

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I've got the 220v Lincoln SP-175+ and a 110v Lincoln Weldpak 100. If I had the money I would have liked to go with the Lincoln Power Mig 200 when I got the 175, but at the time I didnt. Where I work we have tons of Mig & TIG Lincolns, Millers, etc welders. From what I've heard, the guys like the Lincoln stuff a little better. It seems to work a little better for what they're using it for. It's mostly thin wall stuff though.

Get the most for your buck. Go big or at least as big as you can. The things hold their value, so you could always sell it down the road to upgrade.

Just my thoughts,

-Scott
 

cleartoy

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I use Millers at the shop i work at, so naturally i bought a Miller 175 with 220\230 input. It does everything i need it to do. Ive never needed to use full power yet!

When considering a Lincolin the clerk mentioned that Linconlins have plastic parts internally. He SAID Millers have 100% steel internals.

That was enough right there.

I can use as big as 11 lbs spool of wire. I like the 210 Millers at work that use 30lbs spools i believe.

Id say for full production work, look for something over 200amps.

For home, its not really necessary for light fabrication.

Ive used welders with 110 input, only to blow the circuit breaker many times.

85 Toyota xtracab 4x4(for sale)
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Got Sand??
 

BlueCoyote

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Another shameless plug.
Got my Hobart Handler 135 from cyberweld.com for $439 delivered to my door step. Has got to be the nicest 100 welder I have ever used.
For big stuff I have a Miller 225 AC/DC arc (220v)- they can be found used for about $225.

Who are you calling Coyote ugly?
 

singlehanded

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It will weld 22 guage up to 3/16 inch single pass. But only has a 20% duty cycle, so you cant weld for long period of time straight. Thats what you pay for a higher duty cycle-thats why one welder is more than another and they have about the same amps. Find out about replace part cost I know that there are generic parts that are cheaper for lincolns but I think you have to buy miller parts that cost a little more for miller welders. Go to 3-4 welding shops and start picking their brains till you know what you want.

local
 

ntsqd

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Hobart is now owned by Miller, since both are good brands, I expect that the quality of each won't change. The Lincolns I've used seemed to be a little better about their adjustments. They are more intuitive, if after using one for a short while you think that 'about there' on the knob is where you want the setting to be, that is very often where it needs to be. The Millers I've used seemed to be a little, but not much, more finicky about their settings. Even after some time on the machine you may not hit the exact setting you need the first time. HAven't used a Hobart in a long time so my experiences with them probably aren't valid. Find a welding suppy shop that will let you 'test drive' all of the machines you are interested in.

I would get a 220V machine if you can swing it. They will run on the 220V clothes dryer circuit you may already have. The duty cycle will be better. You won't be stopping to wait for the welder to cool down nearly as much or as long on a big job as you will with a 110V machine.

Lincoln offers a welding school that has a national reputation for turning out knowledgable and capable welders. I've wanted to go for many years. The only problem is that it's in Ohio or someplace in about that part of the country.

TS

"It only seems kinky the first time"
-- Bumpersticker seen in Lost Wages
 

BlueCoyote

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Got the Hobart for sheetmetal and cage work. Wanted 110 so it could be portable - take it along with a generator for remote use. Yes, a 220 would be nice but only had so much to spend.
For frame / diff / heavier work I got the ac/dc arc machine.

Who are you calling Coyote ugly?
 

1992f150

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One thing when you buy a mig machine, and you look at the maximum thickness they arent telling you the whole story. Mainly what they do is say, oh this 110 miller mig can weld up to 3/16th single pass. What they dont tell you is thats when you run fluxcore wire only. With mig wire its closer to 1/8th max and thats still kinda pushing it. Also apparently different 110 volt outlets are capable of providing more power than others, and they always say "welds X thickness" because they use the most powerful 110v outlet they can get.
Get a mig machine that can weld say 1/4", then buy a cheap lincoln tombstone arc welder on the recycler for all the plate thats thicker. I would prefer arc welding +1/4" and up anyway over mig.

Azusa: shame of the foothills
 

Kritter

Krittro Campbell
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put a larger breaker in if you plan on using a 110 volt welder. People giv ethe 110 migs a bad name but it is because they are too cheap to put in the right breaker...10 amp or 15 amp breaker isnt gonna cut it.

Kris
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"Jesus loves you, everybody else thinks you're an A-hole"
 

1992f150

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110 just will not put out enough juice for anything substantial when your trying to run on DC Negitive.

Azusa: shame of the foothills
 

punkassslacker

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Right now I have the lincoln 175+ and that little thing has some balls, I was making a stand for my tubing notcher, which is 1/4" and it had no problem welding it. It's 220, I wired the garage for it, it's not to hard to do. I plan on using it to weld my roll cage when I get my steel next week.
 

DougM

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We just bought the Hobart 175. Its a great welder for almost anything. We've welded 1/4" no problem. I run it off my dryer 220v circuit. its a nice welder, made by Miller and has a good warranty. we use it with a 15# tank of CO2 or Argon mix.

we got ours with a cart, and FREE SHIPPING thru this company

http://www.brwelder.com/home.html
 
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