What are the ODDS of Finishing Baja 1000 on your first try?

osborne

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I dont know the exact odds. You can stack them in your favor though. Have a solid vehicle with plenty of spares for everything, a great chase crew, preparation and be smart while racing. You have to keep your vehicle together and keep moving as much as possible. If the goal is finishing and you can keep that in mind for the entire race your chances go up. If you start racing and push to hard you drop your odds. We did our first (and only) in 06 and were blessed with a finish and 6th in class. It was awesome. Hope you do it and have a great experience with friends and family. You wont regret it.
 

Josh 8

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20%

That is with a newbie team. As Osborn said above crew has a lot to do with it. Actually if you go go down with a chase crew that has never “done Baja” I would estimate the odds to be even less that 20%. Probably single digit.

Think of all the mistakes the race car driver can do in the car. Your chase crew can make them too in Baja. And if they don’t know where there going they will most likely get lost or possibly wrecked.

Every one on the team knowing how Baja works is a huge advantage.
 
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Curt LeDuc

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The real deal is you have a 100% chance of having an adventure you will talk about for the rest of your life. Driver, chase crew,co driver, family and friends back home watching the tracker all nite and all the keyboard jockeys! Kit Carson said it best( the cowards never started and the weak died along the way!) Viva Baja


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MasTacos

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Without an experienced crew and leadership, I'd describe your chances as "Negligible with a 100% chance of adventure" as Curt pointed out. With an experienced crew and leadership, I'd describe it as "Minimal with a 100% chance of adventure". If I recall correctly, Mr Acer, with all the $$ in the world, had both trucks break down for exactly the same reason, within a quarter mile of each other.
 

copers

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Ufff that's a good question.

We did our first attempt in 2014 and we couldn't reach the finish line within the time limit; we did 57 hours to reach La Paz. It was an awesome adventure, a lot of problems but a lot of experience learned.

Our second attempt was in las 2017 baja 1000 and we finished third in class, great moments with friends and family.

With the correct driver and pit crew you could finish in your first attemt; always thinking in take care of the car, don't abuse it and respect Baja; the goal always is to beat Baja.

Saludos!!!!
 

GBRACER

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Normally not good however the YOLO team running a 5-1600 went 8 for 9 trys in a row!!! with lots of podiums , possibly one of the best records of all classes
Won the championship in 2012 as well.
 

Zac Reish

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I feel like teams just trying to finish drive too slow in efforts to protect their ill prepared car/team. If the time limits were reasonable/longer the chances would go way up. You really have to be pushing a solid pace to have a chance with all the logjams that occur. Driving like a whimp or an idiot won't get you very far in baja.
 

JDDurfey

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The Baja 2000 was my first Baja race. I was part of a Pro bike team and we finished after much adversity. The finishing percentage was higher in that race than all the Baja 1000's. I attest that to the teams being more cautious and taking care of their equipment.

Finishing the 1000 in your first year is 100% attainable. However, if you don't finish, you still have made many memories and learned a few lessons on how to do it better the next time. And you might not finish on your second try either, but that is just how Baja goes sometimes.
 

motoman29

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Proper Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance

If you don't have anyone on your team with some Baja experience, it will be much more difficult to finish.

There are lots of small details that add up to big things. Knowing how hard to push yourself and the vehicle are paramount.

Having a solid chase plan and crew can make or break your chances of a finish.

Plan. Plan. Plan. Then plan some more. You will need to have a solid plan for as many issues as you can possibly consider (and for the million others).

You will have an adventure of a lifetime no doubt!
 

mgobaja

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2017 Baja 1000, we had a team consisting of some veteran and rookie Baja racers and chasers mixed together. Set out with two main goals, getting all 4 chase trucks and crews down and back, damage free and injury free, and also finishing the race. We knew if we finished, we stood a fair shot at a podium. We had 4 groups of drivers / co-drivers, and the goal for each group was to hand the car off to the next in the best shape possible. 1st group succeeded, 2nd group succeeded, 3rd group had some engine issues the eventually led to our DNF around Race Mile 700. We took every spare we had, planned fuel stops super conservatively, gave each group no more than 300 miles, and sent those doing the last two legs, ahead so they were not exhausted when they got in the car to race their section. WE relied heavily on a few 30+ year veteran racers for logistics ideas and planning, used the best pit crews available, Checkers and BFG for additional support in areas where our crews could not be. We had plans and back up plans and even back up plans for those plans.

The guys that were in the car when it broke had adventures while being towed out by some locals, which i think they will never forget either.

WE accomplished 1 of the two goals, everybody returned home safe. And for the most part, we all had fun and will have those memories for the rest of our lives. A few of us had some travel adventures after the race even as we had planned on spending some time in La Paz after the race. I for one am VERY grateful for the opportunity I had.
 
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partybarge_pilot

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It's all down to the team and a little luck. 2006 we finished the 7S truck and put it on the trailer. Headed to Baja with a couple laps around the shop as a test drive.

We were the second to last finisher on time but won our class. That was the longest 3 days of My life but totally worth it.

Most of the team had plenty of Baja experience though. For a complete team of newb's, I'd give you less than a 50% chance of finishing.
 

Kiwiflyer

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I was lucky enough to not only finish but to podium in my first Baja 1000, not only that but I Solo drove it without a break 40 odd hours, this would not of happened without an amazing crew and an amazing truck. Although I have 20 years of racing experience nothing and I mean nothing could of prepared us for such a physically and mentally demanding assault on the body that raced was. Love him or gate him Pete Sohren does put together a pretty amazing package for the complete rookie but it ain’t for the faint hearted but I would throughly recommend it. Unfortunately the Baja bug bit hard and I now
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drive in the Pilgrim Trophy Truck Spec Team. Looking forward to driving 1/2 of this years 1000 in a lot more powerful machine


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Rory

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My first Baja 1000 in my own vehicle was in 2009. I had only co-rode in one other Baja 1000 and that was in 1995 in a class 5 unlimited. I've had a lot of Baja experience as a chaser, spectator and even some preruns but 2009 was the first time I was in charge of everything. I raced the TT Killer in sportsman, had a plan to stay in the car the entire race and hoped I wouldn't have to get out except to pee. That plan was mostly successful besides getting stuck in the silt near Laguna Salada. After that it was just regularly scheduled pit stops at BFG and a great supporting cast from my crew. 23 hours and 22 minutes later I was back in Ensenada with only a few hallucinations to slow me down in the last 60 miles. Our team ended up winning our class on our first try! Sportsman or not, a win is a win baby. Most of my crew are members of RDC to this day and I couldn't have done it without them.

Keys for success for first timers:
*PREP YOUR STUFF! Race car, chase trucks, trailers.
*No Drama team members, leave the bad seeds at home no matter how much you THINK you need them.
*Try and get some guys on the team with any Baja experience.
*If you can't prerun go up to a well known racer and pick his brain for a few minutes. He can give you mile-markers to stay alert of (that's what I did in 2009).
*Make sure your crew understands how dangerous the HWY's are and not to take risks.
*Have a plan and stick to it....easier said than done when the green flag drops.

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Fourstroker

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It’s possible if you listen to the advice of others and do your homework. Please dont think you already know it all and be open to suggestion. My first effort with a bunch of first timers resulted in a drama-free finish in class 12 in '05.
 

J Burleson

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2017 50th was my first attempt. I spent 2.5 months straight prepping the car by myself, (newer alumicraft 10) and had to move shops 1 week before the race, by myself. The only prerunning I did was the first 11 miles in my 98 Trooper. We used Baja pits for fuel, and were running BFG's, so we had their pits available. Our team consisted of 7 people, 4 of which were mostly just along for the ride. We had 1 truck, 1 trailer, and my Trooper. Limited spares, because a limited budget. The only time we turned a wrench was when the eventual 2nd place in cl10 decided to drive through us at rm53, and wiped out the return line on the power steering. I drove it for 80 miles with no ps to BFG pits at Mikes road where they got us going again(I just hung out and flirted with the TV announcer girl that was there!) 32 hours later we pulled it into La Paz. You need some luck, but you need to drive your own race. Drive it to finish. And prep your junk!! I am always blown away at some of the truly half assed prep jobs you see in Ensenada! You DONT need a huge team and 16 fancy chase trucks. One of the best Baja 1000 stories Ive heard was from Ramsey, when he did a peninsula run, solo in a 1600 car, with only his wife and friend in a truck as his chase crew. He got the finish in like 53 hours!
 

Zac Reish

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Something I realized about myself after a few baja 1000's is I have a hard time staying awake past (or approaching) 24 hours. I don't know how people pull all nighters driving or racing. I'd be a liability in a chase or race car. What do people do in a race car to stay alert and running a winning pace after 10 to 15 hours? Drugs are the only thing I haven't tried? I try to rest/sleep as much as possible leading up, hydrate, and pound a ton of food to have the energy but At 10 hours straight my pace drops off big time.. And no i am not out of shape. I'm In my 30's fit, and healthy. What should most people expect to do outside of ivan the iron man and ramsey to run competitive beyond 10 to 15 hours? Or is this just like anything force and push until it gets easier?
 

J Burleson

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Maybe chew on a ginseng root at the beginning of your stint?! or just go organic and pound a few adderall. cause a little meth never hurt anyone lol
 

retroblazer

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I don't like to give up too many speed secrets( cause I don't have any), but chewing on a piece of Nicorette gum, will jump me out of my shorts. I don't smoke, but nicotine will crank you up. I learned this trick from a college buddy who studied accounting. Not a good long term habit, but holy JC, just part of a piece of gum will do it, any more, and I want to gag.
 

mgobaja

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Something I realized about myself after a few baja 1000's is I have a hard time staying awake past (or approaching) 24 hours. I don't know how people pull all nighters driving or racing. I'd be a liability in a chase or race car. What do people do in a race car to stay alert and running a winning pace after 10 to 15 hours? Drugs are the only thing I haven't tried? I try to rest/sleep as much as possible leading up, hydrate, and pound a ton of food to have the energy but At 10 hours straight my pace drops off big time.. And no i am not out of shape. I'm In my 30's fit, and healthy. What should most people expect to do outside of ivan the iron man and ramsey to run competitive beyond 10 to 15 hours? Or is this just like anything force and push until it gets easier?
Knowing I was going to get in between 6 and 8 PM at the 2017 Baja 1000, then be in the car for about 9 to 10 hours I did a few things. got to the pit where I was getting in several hours early, took my contact lenses out, let my eyes rest, took a few 30 minute naps, drank lots of water, and about an hour before we got in, I ate half sandwich and a banana. Other than the water we had in the car, and a few asprin, that was it until a few hours after I got out of the car. I was up for almost 36 hours straight, with those two 30 minute naps early in that 36 hour stint, and once out of the car and riding in the chase truck I drank 2 of the 5 hour energy drinks, over a 12 hour period.
 
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