What does it take to codrive?

TKowns

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I been into offroad racing since i was 10 years old which i am now 18. I Just recently graduated high school and i think its time to get more into racing. So i was wondering what does it take to be a codriver in the sport? How to prepare,what cost may be for a codriver seat, etc. im not looking to jump into a bigger class right away. I want to work my way up from a smaller class to the bigger class as i get more experience. If anyone could help me out and let me know what the best thing to do for getting into the sport is, i would appreaciate that.
 

Zac Reish

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Good post and great approach. In my experience speak clearly, dont yell, learn how to use a gps, recognizing distances through the gps vs looking at what the driver is looking at. Askng the driver what he wants to hear and how helps as well. Knowing how to prep and repair the vehicle you're racing is a must. I know theres a ton more but that should get things started.
 

Layton

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I have got to ride with some of the best in our sport (Roseller, PAB, Deegan, Childress etc.) and the one thing I can tell you is everyone is diffrent. Listen to your Driver and see what they want to hear.
 

Lord Green

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Don't be prone to carsickness. Now days, the co-dog has his eyes glued to the GPS, it's like reading a book on a very rough, bumpy rollercoaster.
 

Wingman357

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If anyone could help me out and let me know what the best thing to do for getting into the sport is, i would appreaciate that.

Buy a good helmet, Neck thingy, and Driving suit. Show up to as many races as you can. Help anyone and everyone. Be respectfull and have a positive attitude. Make some friends, then start helping those friends with their race prep. Sooner or later someone will stick you in the co-dawg seat. Good Luck!!!
 

Tom_Willis

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Work on as many different skill sets as you can. You might end up having a skill nobody else on the team has, and that will make you valuable. A guy who REALLY knows transmissions, or radios, etc., and has the basic tools on him can be quite an asset to a small team. You don't need a fancy chase truck, either. As long as you have reliable transportation, and YOU are reliable, somebody will pick you up. Good luck.
 

yamaducci

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I was in your shoes a few years ago when I was headed for 40 years old (well 38, then). I had wanted to run the Baja 1000 since I was about 8 years old and finally felt like I wanted to do something about it. After being an Autobody Repair Man/fabricator/Suspension Mechanic for 10 years, building my own Meyers Manx, learing camera skills, welding, first-aid, CPR, learning how to read dirt on my motocross bike and building stock and performance Type 1 VW engines I felt like I had something to offer a team. Since I always lacked the cash to travel to the desert from the East Coast (Maryland) and with no connections to the sport, it has taken the internet and a few $$ to get to the next level for me. I placed a Volunteer ad in the services section of race-dez to offer my skills and pit/chase help for the exchange of learning the business of racing. I never expected to get in the car but it did eventually happen.
Once I was offered a seat in the car I decided to do P90x to get ready for the beat-down a 1600/12 car will give you. I also wanted to be as light as I could be. Every 7 Lb's equals 1 HP they say. you probably won't have to worry about that at your age but be able to lift your own weight if you need to. Then you will have to invest in all your own gear...helmet, suit, shoes gloves etc. Learn the GPS a little and ask what the driver wants out of you. Don't distract him; your there to help, He will give you feedback (if the head set is working) <------An inside joke if "Clogking" reads this.

Unless you are racing with family you will probably be expected to "pay your way" if you are privateer racing. Contribute what you can/when you can. (I.E buy the fuel)
If you are close to the car and can work on it; then get in the shop and learn every nut and bolt . Learn to have an Eagle eye for somthing broken or out of place and how to fix it. Seconds/minutes count in the pits to diagnose and fix a problem. If you are good at it you will be noticed.

I hope this helps a little.
John Cox
 

CaptinCrash

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The ablity to pee your pants and change a 39 in under 2 mins without help a drive shaft in under 8 and the ablity to remeber terrian and if and where the dirt gets sandy or soft in the middle of nowhere but mostly pee your pants i am not from a racing family and i made it too the top so dont ever let anyone tell you that its impossible i did it but i pull of the impossible quite a bit :cool: lol jk
 

hotdogwater

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Here's another good place to start...
 
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Havasubud

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Get with a team and volunteer to help out with the truck or buggy. Get to know it inside out, how to change a tire, a brake caliper or power steering servo. You need to know how to do all of that so if the need arises, you can jump out and get to work. The last thing you want is to have your driver smash a finger trying to fix something. Know how to use the gps and listen to your driver. You need to have thick skin as well, because if things aren't going well, sometimes they may take it out on you. Don't take it personal. I am no expert here though, I have only had 2 opportunities to co-drive, but thats what I did. Good luck.
 

WickedGravityVideo

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The ablity to pee your pants and change a 39 in under 2 mins without help a drive shaft in under 8 and the ablity to remeber terrian and if and where the dirt gets sandy or soft in the middle of nowhere but mostly pee your pants i am not from a racing family and i made it too the top so dont ever let anyone tell you that its impossible i did it but i pull of the impossible quite a bit :cool: lol jk

This just reminds me to tell you that you are my hero..... you are a superhero! WHen can we make a feature-length video all about you?
Shouldn't we change your name from Cap'n Crash ...to... Captain Impossible?
 

Tipracer

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For starters hook up with a team, anyteam...learn what offroad racing is really about at the bottom level, get to know the car you wish to copilot for and the driver as well. Its a good start and if you stay comitted you will eventually get the chance. Prerunning in the car with your team will give you and your driver a good idea of what to expect. Good luck..
 

mrmatt

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Testicular fortitude. Co-dawging is not for sissies!

Knowing what your driver needs is important. My co-drivers know what to say, how to say it and when to say it. Every driver is different in what they need.
 

Bryan J

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everyone is right so far, know what the driver needs to here, and what he doesnt need to know. knowing and reading the terrain is vital IMHO. me personally im not a very good mechanic and thats something that im trying to work on. I feel its my biggest weakness. However i think the most important thing is to have a good chemistry with your driver. you guys are a team in the car together, and both team-mates have to understand and relate to the other.
 

tedq732

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i have only been a co dog for one team, didn´t know anything about racing, so here is what a think
1.- be willing
2.- be available
3.- be humble
be willing to do anything you are asked to do as far as racing and the vehicle is concerned
be available when the car owner calls on you to work on the car,
be humble, don´t act or try to know more than the car owner.
the worse thing you cand do, coming into racing is when the owner calls a day for working on the car, is you saying, ooohhh man, i have something else going. and then, start to learn about the car you will be co dogging for, and be upfront, tell him what you can and connot do. because at least he knows if somthing happens, he wont be as pissed off if he is depending on you to do something you cannot do. and come to an agreement on how much you can pitch in for every race.
i think that is good start, the rest comes as time goes by and you become more knowledgeable. i was fortunate to have two good drivers and enjoyed my time in the truck. good luck to you
 

Endo242@link

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Know the & repair the vehicle, communicate well with the driver & team (speak slowly & clearly), & know how to calm the driver down is a must.
 

Polarcub

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Just my two cents....and it has already been said but chemistry with the driver helps for sure....outside of that your co-dawg has to have the fortitude to say something and not just wuss out. I made that mistake once and the results ended up in the car getting wadded up. I knew we were going faster than we should have been and failed to slow the driver down...lesson learned.
Generically speaking a good co-dawg needs to be able to give the driver what they need...every driver is different. Sometimes its the ability to call traffic, fix the car,keep the driver focused, or even navigate the driver to the good lines.
This weekend I was invited to co-drve in the MORE 500 for a couple of laps with a team I have never driven with. The first question I asked once in the car was what do you need out of me? It took me about 20 miles to get a good feel of what the driver wanted from me. I already knew the basics but every driver is different.
Ah good co-dawg can be tough to find but when one is found its a very good thing. The best way to get the invite is volunteering for a team and build the relationship....Letting someone just hop into the car to co-dawg for a race is not a normal thing and not taken lightly by most drivers/owners there is a bond of trust that must be developed. Good luck with your journey I love this sport and even though it comes with a price it is well worth .
 
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