What does it take to codrive?

Sparky

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Having been co-dawging since the late 80's, here's what I can come up with...

Know your driver. Know when he is tired. Know when he is thirsty. Know how to keep his head in the game. Our driver is faster with me than anyone else because I know how to talk to him.

Know your vehicle. Know when you are going too slow. Know when you are going too fast. Know how to tell the driver to speed up or slow down (important tip - they do NOT like to be told either of those things). I did once ask a driver if he wanted me to save him money and just shut the car off now, or do we want to wait until he breaks it before we stop.

Make McGuyver your role model. Know how to fix stuff with whatever you find in the car. I stopped a leaking oil pressure line with a zip tie and a band-aid. I stick-welded our front end back together in the gravel pit at Parker.

Know how to keep cool and keep calm and react quickly to any situation. An exploding transmission and fire at night will test that. Sit in the car fully suited up, blindfolded, strapped in, and know how to shut everything off and get out of the car without being able to see. Added bonus if you can find and operate the fire extinguisher while still blindfolded.

Know how to pee while being shaken violently. Because there are no rest areas in racing. Personally I use a catheter because I hate being wet.

Never, EVER, let the driver know that you are scared.

Know where the switches are for everything. You won't be able to read labels, so know where they are. Most important know where the horn button is.

Watch your mirrors. Extremely important in the slower classes. Do not wait for the faster car to be right on your tail before you tell the driver he needs to move over. Even worse, do not let the driver be surprised by a faster car blasting past.

Grow a couple extra sets of eyes. You need to watch the course, the gauges, the GPS, the mirrors, find differents switches and buttons, and watch the car itself all at the same time. Co-driving is NOT about going for a ride. Co-driving is WORK.

Know the smoother line. Guide the driver to the smoother line.

Do not be afraid to get your nice new fire suit dirty. At some point you will be rolling around in rocks, dirt, cactus, bugs, and snakes while being up to your elbows in oil and grease. Be OK with that.

And have fun.
 

Jacob7672

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Having been co-dawging since the late 80's, here's what I can come up with...

Know your driver. Know when he is tired. Know when he is thirsty. Know how to keep his head in the game. Our driver is faster with me than anyone else because I know how to talk to him.

Know your vehicle. Know when you are going too slow. Know when you are going too fast. Know how to tell the driver to speed up or slow down (important tip - they do NOT like to be told either of those things). I did once ask a driver if he wanted me to save him money and just shut the car off now, or do we want to wait until he breaks it before we stop.

Make McGuyver your role model. Know how to fix stuff with whatever you find in the car. I stopped a leaking oil pressure line with a zip tie and a band-aid. I stick-welded our front end back together in the gravel pit at Parker.

Know how to keep cool and keep calm and react quickly to any situation. An exploding transmission and fire at night will test that. Sit in the car fully suited up, blindfolded, strapped in, and know how to shut everything off and get out of the car without being able to see. Added bonus if you can find and operate the fire extinguisher while still blindfolded.

Know how to pee while being shaken violently. Because there are no rest areas in racing. Personally I use a catheter because I hate being wet.

Never, EVER, let the driver know that you are scared.

Know where the switches are for everything. You won't be able to read labels, so know where they are. Most important know where the horn button is.

Watch your mirrors. Extremely important in the slower classes. Do not wait for the faster car to be right on your tail before you tell the driver he needs to move over. Even worse, do not let the driver be surprised by a faster car blasting past.

Grow a couple extra sets of eyes. You need to watch the course, the gauges, the GPS, the mirrors, find differents switches and buttons, and watch the car itself all at the same time. Co-driving is NOT about going for a ride. Co-driving is WORK.

Know the smoother line. Guide the driver to the smoother line.

Do not be afraid to get your nice new fire suit dirty. At some point you will be rolling around in rocks, dirt, cactus, bugs, and snakes while being up to your elbows in oil and grease. Be OK with that.

And have fun.

This pretty much sums it up
 

e_lunatic

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one of the best pieces of advice i ever got was if you can hear yourself talk with your helmet on then you're talking too loud. too many codawgs yell into the mic and it just causes headaches
 

papajon14

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I started helping a local friend in a 16 car for starts..
Then before trophylite even started I helped Matt Scaroni and Justin Mamer (a good friend) change a transmission at 1 in the morning.. Before trophylites dirtsports cover shoot.. Then they called me the next day to codrive the budlight dash.. Then I started working for trophylite/Smd doing grunt work and working my way up.. Now I have a great feel in plenty of different racecars and have helped plenty of people for free to build up my expierence. Now I allways bring your suit and helmet to a race.. You just never know! Haha
Just stay positive.
 

Sheaco

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Last edited by a moderator:

Tom_Willis

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Never, EVER, let the driver know that you are scared.

Know where the switches are for everything. You won't be able to read labels, so know where they are. Most important know where the horn button is.

Co-driving is NOT about going for a ride. Co-driving is WORK.


^^^^^
Dude knows of what he speaks
 

NoThrottle

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Watch your mirrors. Extremely important in the slower classes. Do not wait for the faster car to be right on your tail before you tell the driver he needs to move over. Even worse, do not let the driver be surprised by a faster car blasting past.

If I may add to that:
Every right angle or tighter turn you need to look back along the track.
With your sissy GPS you have it easy remembering the places where it's safe to let people pass without stopping. Move off the track to the downwind side and know how much speed you can carry and exactly when the chasing car will pass you. get your driver gunning it to get back on the track just before they pass you so you are accelerating back to race speed as you return to the track - AND ALWAYS KNOW IF THERE IS A SECOND FASTER CAR IN THEIR DUST! if that is the case it is safer to stop altogether on the upwind side of the track. the fast guys are in a different race to you and how you deal with them saves both teams time in their own respective races. Passing is very important when you are in a slow car.

Good sleep trackside is a significant performance advantage. Bring earplugs because some jerk will put a generator near your tent guaranteed. No alcohol or sweet food and drink before bed time helps you sleep better too. Driving tired is as bad as driving drunk.
 

randy s

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first off you need to find someone who will give you the chance. then you have to have a large sack. then you have to not be prone to getting motion sickness. then you have to know the functions of everything on the car or truck and where they are. then you have to have a working knowledge of them. then you have to be able to keep tabs on your mirrors, gps, and gauges continuously for long periods of time. then you have to let the driver know what's happening with the truck, where to go, know when someone's behind you and what to look out for. and massaging their ego when he/she does well helps alot. you have to be able to slow the driver down if they're too hot or speed them up when they're laggin'. you have to act calm and not looze it. then the most important thing to know is that all co-drivers have to buy drinks and dinner for the whole crew followed by a night of frolicking at the paris for everyone on your dime as well...win or looze...pm me if you're willing to do all this chit and i'll find a spot for you.
 
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wrightracing.net

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BRINGTHERUCKUS

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Having a good personal relationship with the driver is a huge plus, riding with my cousins and Eric Tolbert has been a breeze, know how the driving likes information given to them, do they like chatter or just pure information only when they need to know it. As a co-driver i just like to stay as calm as possible. its in my nature (to a point) a calm voice talking to a pissed off driver works wonders. same for calling in on the radio. Knowing how to set up a GPS is a plus too. my first race i had the zoom really messed up... calling corners 3/4 of a mile before we got there haha
but, now Im getting the itch to get back out in something soon so if anyone needs an expirenced co-dog PM me.. Have all equipment including HNR.
 
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