what's the name of that stuff

randy s

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they use to check for cracks during tech inspection for score? that powder. where is it sold? thanks in advance.
 

ZTFab

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Magnaflux.

You can get Magnaflux Spotcheck which is the dye penetrant and developer that comes in spray cans from a welding supply store.

The OG method uses the magnetic particles hence the name Magnaflux.

Check out Magnaflux.com if you want to see all of the methods.
 

tmathews

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they use to check for cracks during tech inspection for score? that powder. where is it sold? thanks in advance.
Got some on the floor right now... Runs about $7.00 a can.
 

fathead

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Here some cool info about penetrant

"Penetrant testing, often called PT or liquid penetrant, was originally called the oil-and-whiting method when it was first used on locomotive parts such as rail car wheels, rods, axles and crankshafts. Parts were first cleaned in boiling caustic soda, then dried and immersed in a tank of oil. The penetrant used was heavy lubricating oil (600W), often thinned with kerosene. Used motor oil also was used to give a darker contrast. Dwell or penetration time ranged from a few hours to a couple of days. The oil was removed with rags dampened with kerosene. After the parts were cleaned and dried, they were painted with a mixture of whiting, or chalk, diluted in denatured alcohol. Where cracks existed, the oil seeped through the white coating, indicating the presence of discontinuities. This was useful only for detecting large, deep cracks. Control over mixing solutions or how long they were applied was left to the operators."
 

randy68

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Here some cool info about penetrant

"Penetrant testing, often called PT or liquid penetrant, was originally called the oil-and-whiting method when it was first used on locomotive parts such as rail car wheels, rods, axles and crankshafts. Parts were first cleaned in boiling caustic soda, then dried and immersed in a tank of oil. The penetrant used was heavy lubricating oil (600W), often thinned with kerosene. Used motor oil also was used to give a darker contrast. Dwell or penetration time ranged from a few hours to a couple of days. The oil was removed with rags dampened with kerosene. After the parts were cleaned and dried, they were painted with a mixture of whiting, or chalk, diluted in denatured alcohol. Where cracks existed, the oil seeped through the white coating, indicating the presence of discontinuities. This was useful only for detecting large, deep cracks. Control over mixing solutions or how long they were applied was left to the operators."

Yep! And, only as good as the inspector.
 

Baja Fool

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Here some cool info about penetrant

"Penetrant testing, often called PT or liquid penetrant, was originally called the oil-and-whiting method when it was first used on locomotive parts such as rail car wheels, rods, axles and crankshafts. Parts were first cleaned in boiling caustic soda, then dried and immersed in a tank of oil. The penetrant used was heavy lubricating oil (600W), often thinned with kerosene. Used motor oil also was used to give a darker contrast. Dwell or penetration time ranged from a few hours to a couple of days. The oil was removed with rags dampened with kerosene. After the parts were cleaned and dried, they were painted with a mixture of whiting, or chalk, diluted in denatured alcohol. Where cracks existed, the oil seeped through the white coating, indicating the presence of discontinuities. This was useful only for detecting large, deep cracks. Control over mixing solutions or how long they were applied was left to the operators."
Dang, nice job Mr. Science!
 

tool46n2

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Here some cool info about penetrant

"Penetrant testing, often called PT or liquid penetrant, was originally called the oil-and-whiting method when it was first used on locomotive parts such as rail car wheels, rods, axles and crankshafts. Parts were first cleaned in boiling caustic soda, then dried and immersed in a tank of oil. The penetrant used was heavy lubricating oil (600W), often thinned with kerosene. Used motor oil also was used to give a darker contrast. Dwell or penetration time ranged from a few hours to a couple of days. The oil was removed with rags dampened with kerosene. After the parts were cleaned and dried, they were painted with a mixture of whiting, or chalk, diluted in denatured alcohol. Where cracks existed, the oil seeped through the white coating, indicating the presence of discontinuities. This was useful only for detecting large, deep cracks. Control over mixing solutions or how long they were applied was left to the operators."
I work for the railroad and we use this stuff on a daily basis. we use it to check the casting of some other parts aswell. great stuff if you know how to use it correctly.:)
 
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