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When will this happen in Trophy Trucks?

I have had this idea in my head since I first learned about shock absorbers as a child.. It's pretty cool to see it in action. Seeing it in action on a trophy truck would be amazing!
 

Ol' Curmudgeon

RDC's resident crackpot
Not as cool as Bose Active Suspension - it can jump, without a jump.
 

y2kbaja

Well-Known Member
I think it would make me sea-sick. Seeing bumps but the car not moving.
 

Sreidmx

Well-Known Member
I dont think its that far off.. the issue is tuning the shock computer to work in a predicable manner, traction varies so much I dont know that its going to work the way we think it will.
In a car they have so many sensors tracking the pitch roll and yaw rates, along with the other crap.. speeds tps, traction etc.. for this to even work properly I bet it would add 500-1k lbs??
 

gmasko1

New Member
Actually I've seen a HMMWV with what they called hydraulic active shocks or something of that nature when they were testing the thought of updating instead of replacing the HMMWV. Ill find the video. But essentially it's a computer that controlled individual shock pressures extremely fast and adjusted them accordingly. I too thought I would have seen it on a TT by now.

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gmasko1

New Member
Found one video I saw. Very interesting technology here. Curious to see if this would ever evolve into the race scene.

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gawdodirt

Well-Known Member
What happens is, it goes into a "limp home mode." Basically, you're F-ed. I had some experience with active suspension on the ZR1 in the 90's. It had a Cessna hydraulic pump, and LOTUS hydraulic actuators at each wheel. Well two per wheel controlling 'in and out' to a) hold the car up. and b) to control the wheel. It had proximity sensors ahead of each wheel detecting the road surface and sending info to the controller. Then the controller would send control data to each solenoid to use hydraulic pressure from an accumulator to control the wheel movement.
Yes, there was an enormous amount of sensors and software to make it all happen. In the end, it was all canned. I rode in the final product, and from my view, people would have been killed in that car at the speeds it was capable of.
Going over a railroad track at 90 mph and only hearing the tires hit the rails, but not feeling the bump, gave you the feeling that it was not there, and could go faster.
Magnehelic is completely different. I have info on that too.

GD
 
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