Toyota TRD Pro Trucks Are A Better Buy Than You Think – race-deZert.com

Toyota TRD Pro Trucks Are A Better Buy Than You Think

RDC TRD Top

As the FJ Cruiser goes extinct, Toyota has decided to make an effort of reviving their off-road lineup with “TRD Pro” versions of their aged Tacoma, Tundra, and 4Runner 4×4 models. These new-trimmed trucks look cool, but they’ve been catching some flack for being overpriced. They’re certainly not cheap, but a closer look at their prices compared to the cost of having your truck modified convinced me the TRD Pro price point isn’t too bad relative to the standard Toyota lineup.

4Runner

2015 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro

2015 4Runner Trail 4WD V6 with aftermarket off-road upgrades: ~$43,000

TRD Pro version: $41,110

The current (fifth-generation) 4Runner is a stout 4×4 with an aggressively chiseled look and reasonable off-road performance out of the box in standard trim.

Let’s say the least-expensive variant with the most off-road goodies is the Trail trim with part-time 4WD, Bridgestone Dueler tires (basically aggressive all-seasons) and Toyota’s Kinetic Dynamic Suspension System (KDSS), and $1,800 option that adds hydraulic regulators to configure the sway bars for driving on pavement or heading off-road.

That brings the price to $38,550. Say you’re into a conservative but complete-and-quality aftermarket lift kit installed for $2,000, and a full set of five Nitto Terra Grapplers (which come with the TRD Pro) will set you back almost another $1,000. Quality beadlock style rims will be another $1,500 at least.

Based on those guestimations, buying a 2015 Toyota 4Runner and beefing it up to near the TRD Pro’s spec costs something like $43,000… and that doesn’t include the slick aesthetic touches or OEM installation warranty and peace of mind you get with buying your truck set up off the shelf. There’s also resale value to consider, which will be a lot higher for an OEM TRD Pro truck than something you’ve set up yourself.

Meanwhile, the 2015 Toyota 4Runner TRD Pro 4×4 V6 is priced at $41,110. Unless you want to build your rig for real rough stuff, the TRD Pro is looking like a pretty good grab relative to the standard 4Runner.

Tacoma

2015 Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro

2015 Tacoma Access Cab V6 4×4 6-Speed Long Bed with aftermarket off-road upgrades: ~$36,000

TRD Pro version: $35,525

Like the 4Runner, the Taco has a well-deserved reputation as a solid choice for off-roaders out of the box. An Access Cab (small doors) V6 4×4 with a 6-speed manual is $30,890. From there, you could either spend about $5,000 on your own aftermarket off-road upgrades bringing your investment to the neighborhood of $36,000, get the TRD Off-Road Extra Value Package with Bilstein shocks, slightly better BF Goodrich tires and a skid plate for $4,935 (~$36,000 again) or pick up the Tacoma TRD Pro for $35,525.

Tundra

2015 Toyota Tundra TRD Pro

2015 Tundra SR5 Double Cab V8 4×4 with aftermarket off-road upgrades: ~$43,000

TRD Pro version: $41,285

Finally, the Tundra. A bit on the portly side for trail running, but hardly inept off the pavement. Start with an SR5 Double Cab V8 4×4 at $37,700. The TRD Off-Road Package for the standard model is $3,000, but spending a little more in the aftermarket will get you a bigger lift if you don’t mind deviating from factory parts. If $5,000 is a reasonable estimate for suspension, wheels, tires, skid plates, and a few minor style tweaks, your looking at some $43,000 to get a standard V8 4×4 Tundra to about the same spec as a TRD Pro. The Pro variant in that size is MSRP’ed at $41,285.


Regardless of what trim level you’re looking at, the Toyota truck lineup is old and expensive. That alone might be enough to keep you out of a Toyota showroom. But their trucks are also consistently high-quality, even if the interior materials don’t feel quite as fancy as their American counterparts.

If you’re looking to add a serious lift, change gearing, or do other major off-road upgrades you’re still going to be better off taking the aftermarket route. But if you’re looking at a more conservative build, and maintaining resale value and factory warranty are important to you, the TRD Pro lineup looks pretty attractive.

Here’s the complete list of what the TRD Pro trucks offer over their “standard” counterparts. Do you think it’s worth the coin?

PartTundra TRD ProTacoma TRD Pro 4Runner TRD Pro
Wheels18” black TRD alloy16” black beadlock style TRD alloyNew 17” black TRD alloy
TiresTundra exclusive Michelin Off-Road Package tiresBFGoodrich All Terrain KONitto Terra Grappler
ShocksTRD-tuned Bilstein High Performance
-Bilstein front and rear digressive piston and valve design
-Bilstein ZoneControl 3-stage, positive sensitive valve design is sensitive to suspension input speed
-Increased shock size adds oil capacity for better heat management and increased control of cavitationFRONT:
– 1.4” of additional wheel travel
– 60mm pistons > 46mm OE
– 18mm shafts > 12mm OE
-“Piggy back” remote reservoirREAR:
– 1.5” of additional wheel travel
– 60mm pistons > 46mm OE
– 18mm shafts > 12mm OE
-“Piggy back” remote reservoir
TRD-tuned Bilstein High Performance
– Bilstein front and rear digressive piston and valve design
-Increased diameter shock size (front) and external reservoir (rear) adds oil capacity for better heat management and increased control of cavitationFRONT:
– 0.75” of additional wheel travel
– 60mm pistons > 36/32mm OE
– 18mm shafts > 12mm OEREAR:
– 1.5” of additional wheel travel
– 46mm pistons > 36/30mm OE
– Remote reservoir
TRD-tuned Bilstein High Performance
– Bilstein front and rear digressive piston and valve design
-Increased diameter shock size (front) and external reservoir (rear) adds oil capacity for better heat management and increased control of cavitationFRONT:
– 0.75” of additional wheel travel
– 60mm pistons > 32mm OE
– 18mm shafts > 12mm OEREAR:
– 1.4” of additional wheel travel
– 46mm pistons > 32mm OE
– Remote reservoir
SpringsUnique TRD-Tuned Front Springs- 2” lift for the front of the vehicle
– Decreased spring rate to improve ride quality over harsh terrain
Unique TRD-Tuned Front Springs- 1.75” lift for the front of the vehicle
– Decreased spring rate to improve ride quality over harsh terrain
Unique TRD-Tuned Front Springs- 1” lift for the front of the vehicle
-Decreased spring rate to improve ride quality over harsh terrain
ExhaustTRD Dual Exhaust- Stainless steel system
– Polished steel dual wall tips
– Reduced back pressure
– Throaty rumble sound
TRD Cat Back Exhaust- Stainless steel system
– Polished steel dual wall tips
– Reduced back pressure
– Throaty rumble sound
No Change from OE
Skid PlateNew TRD Front Skid Plate- 1/4” thick aluminum with oil pan access panel– Black OE front skid plateTRD Stamped Front Skid Plate- 1/4” thick aluminum with venting for front differential
Exterior– Unique “TOYOTA” front grill
– “TRD Pro” bed panel stamping
– Matte and Satin Black “TUNDRA” and iForce 5.7L V8 badging on doors
Multi-reflector halogen headlights with black sport bezels and manual level control
– Unique “TOYOTA” front grill
– Black “TRD PRO” external hard badge
– Black “TACOMA” badging on doors
– Unique “TOYOTA” front grill
– Black “TRD PRO” external hard badges
– Black front and rear lower bumper accent
Exterior ColorsBlack, Super White, and Inferno (all-new exclusive color)
Interior– TRD Shift Knob
– TRD Floor Mats
– Unique seat color with red stitching
– Unique IP ornament insert
– TRD Shift Knob
– TRD Floor Mats
– TRD Shift Knob
– TRD Floor Mats

Images: Toyota

 

7 Comments

  1. I work pipelines, I bought the Tundra Pro because it’s ready to go off road. I have owned 2 other Tundra’s since 2007. One of which was a 4X4 that I used for my work. It was a wonderful truck, but needed the suspension upgraded and lifted for the terrain I drive in. As people say, “You get what you pay for” and “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”.

  2. I’ve had my Tundra Pro for 8 months now as a daily driver and fun toy. Love every minute in it. Definately a head turner, but especially the die-hard Tundra/Tacoma fans in my market. Love the throaty note of the exhaust, towing capacity, comfort, trim, and hum of the tires.

    If you want to pay invoice on any of these three you need to purchase from a high volume dealer. I purchased from the #3 dealer of Tundras in the nation. Yes, it meant a one-way plane ticket ($180) and a drive home, but it sure beat paying $4,000 over invoice. The reality is the dealers in my market wanted $49,000 and were unwilling to negociate. Reality check-
    Toyota alocates vehicles on previous year’s sales. Once they sell through whether that’s April 1st or November 1st, they won’t get any more. For the Tundra, Toyota is only making ~1% as a Pro. If you want a specific cab and color you’re looking at a long wait and paying more, again unless you go to a dealership that sells 200+ Tundras per month. Hint: The top three Tundra sales dealerships are in the same state they’re made. I waited 2 weeks while they pulled it from ‘The Port’ which is a storage location before shipping out to the dealerships. I also paid invoice. With a very limited run, I have yet to hear anyone paying less than invoice.
    Stock tires were an embarasing Michelin highway tread. While this may have helped Toyota in fuel efficiency ratings, it surved zero purpose off road. So the only change I negociated at the dealership was putting on 5, Baja MTZ 33X11.50R18, bed spray, and clear bra. Note- with the Pro suspension package I’ve had no rubbing issues and it’s the biggest tire you can fit in the stock spare location and with zero rubbing.

  3. Warranted, the Bilstein shocks that come on the TRD Pro 4Runner are better for highspeed offroad than the standard shocks, but you can not get the KDSS on a TRD Pro. Considering that suspension suppliment system is something that is integrated throughout the truck, it would be a pricey add-on (if even possible) to the TRD Pro. Everything that is on the Pro you can install on a Trail Edition. You will have more capability with the Trail or Trail Premium with KDSS than you can customize to get on the TRD Pro. Don’t get me wrong, it is a mean truck, and I would love to have one. I would put my money into the Trail with KDSS however.

  4. This is my fourth Reg-Cab style Tundra (I don’t care for the look of Dbl or Crew Cabs on any pickup). Anyway… I was literally shocked to see what was engraved on the interior side of my new Tundra TRD PRO wheels I bought for my just-purchased 2016 Tundra SR with the 5.7V8 engine… ‘Made in China.” For me, this is NOT a political or an ethnic thing, but rather a major quality thing. Tundra is made in USA, and the reason quality is noticeably better than its counterparts. TRD PRO wheels stamped “Made in China.” Unbelievable!! The next time you are at a Toyota dealership, price a set of these wheels and you’ll immediately appreciate why I am very, very disappointment (more like pissed off). Toyota: you are slowiy, but surely, losing me…

  5. You bitching over chinese made wheels but you have owned four trucks built by a japanese owned car company? That’s funny.

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