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Tempt Media’s Ford Raptor Camera Truck

Tempt Media is a production company that has long been responsible for creating some of the best video content in the motorsports industry. Creating the recent Alan Ampudia’s AMPD2 and producing Ken Block’s Gymkhana, Bj Baldwin’s Recoil, and working with major brands like Toyo Tires and Monster Energy. A major tool to help shoot these over-the-top videos is with their camera cars and insane camera systems. This allows them to bring Hollywood-level professionalism to the world of off-road. A few months ago, we were able to tag along with Tempt and the Hoonigan crew in Plaster City as they produced two episodes of Ken Block’s video series documenting his journey to the Baja 1000 called Whoopaclypse Now. They had their Ford Raptor camera truck equipped with an insane camera setup that allows them to obtain the highest quality cinematic and smoothest shots otherwise known as “bangers.” 

But first, who is Tempt Media? Chris Adams, Eric Everly, Vladimir Schkolnic, and Bryan Moore founded Tempt Media in 2011 with a passion for developing content around motorsports and extreme action sports. With one of their first big projects being Bj Baldwin’s Recoil video, it set the stage to build a relationship with Monster Energy and Toyo tires that would go on to create incredible videos and productions for years to come. To this day, they have made some of the most viral videos in the off-road world we have come to know and admire. They currently employ eight full-time employees and can scale up to 80 people on a large production. 

Ok, back to their camera truck.

But what makes a camera car, a camera car? 

A camera car is a special vehicle built for complex camera systems on a gimbal system to allow the camera to stabilize while shooting another car. They are often painted or wrapped in matte black, so they don’t reflect light while shooting. This allows them to get certain shots beyond just a guy hanging out the side of a window with a camera. This enhances the level of professionalism of their videos and enhances the experience for the viewer. The results of Tempts footage in Plaster City was incredible – a side-by-side shot of the Trophy Truck as Ken Block absolutely sends it while the camera seamlessly seems unphased by the bumpy road the Raptor is driving down. 

The Ford F150 Raptor camera car is the perfect car for their jobs shooting off-road content. But in this case, it is a high-speed Geiser G6 Trophy Truck barreling through the desert piloted by Ken Block. Luke Babb from Axis Innovations built and regularly preps their F150 Raptor. It utilizes a full exterior roll cage to mount the massive camera crane on the roof. Ultimate Arm with the SHOTOVER F1 six-axis gyro allowing for use in the harshest and extreme conditions. The Ultimate Arm is able to rotate on a 360-degree axis above the truck while the camera is on its seperate own axis. This is the setup that they typically use on a helicopter to shoot races like King of the Hammers or the SCORE Baja 1000.  It costs about $450,000 just on its own. While its purpose was to be on a helicopter, they have mounted it to a wide range of things. Helicopters, boats, trucks, cars, and even jet skis.

There is a lot of weight on the roof, but the truck still needs to perform off-road, so it is equipped with all SVC control arms, bump stops, and tie rods. A Howe custom steering rack. It has Deaver springs, and Fox shocks tuned by Axis Innovations to accommodate all the extra added weight along to maintain the off-road performance of a Raptor and all of its glory. 

On the inside of it, there is room for four people, and there is a monitor in every seat. Typically every person in each seat would have their own job. A driver, a person to operate the position of the camera arm, a person to operate the focus of the camera, and a director. All of their roles are important as they must work harmoniously together to get the perfect shot.

The work they did that day for Ken Block and the Hoonigan crew was incredible. We all have tools that help take our job to the next level, whether it is a tool we use in fabrication, woodworking, or filmmaking. Tempt Media’s Raptor is no exception; it is their tool to elevate their video production in the off-road industry. But it is just a small part of how they are able to craft their videos into masterpieces; that is something I can’t fit into 800 words. Regardless, it was interesting to get an in-depth look at their camera truck, and who knows, we may even see it out in the desert near you. 

Here is a video utilizing footage from that day:

Specs:

Chassis: 2014 Ford Raptor Camera Car Built by Axis Innovations
Weight: Heavy
Engine:  V8 6.2L
Lights: Baja Designs
Tires: 35×12.5r17 Toyo Tires
Wheels: Method Race Wheels 
Front Suspension: SVC Control Arms Fox shocks tuned by Axis Innovations
Rear Suspension: Deaver Leaf Springs Fox shocks
Communication: PCI Race Radios
Steering: Howe Performance hydraulic assist, SVC tie rods
Camera Car: Ultimate Arm and SHOTOVER F1 6-axis Gyro  with custom Exo cage
Interior: Small HD monitors for each seat

Klaus

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Its pretty nice but i thought the reason drones came about was to replace these type of things?
You make a compelling point and Id like to hear from the pro-video/film crowd the justification.

The advantage i can see is that a jib arm can handle a much heavier camera. Cameras like Red or analog film.

Irregardless its impressive and the Tempt crew does fantastic work. Good guys.
 

DoitforBMoore

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Its pretty nice but i thought the reason drones came about was to replace these type of things?

Comparing apples to oranges.

A drone lens is fixed and the sensor technology is super limited. While it’s ok for most. I would compare the drone stuff to your moms handy cam that she would use at your birthday party.

We are using 6 axis 129 pound payloads that are fully stable at up to 1000mm with an 8k sensor. The reason you don’t see much shaking in drone images is because it’s like 18mm.

Our system is the same used to shoot the new top gun movie. So it’s rated for over 400knots 4gs and will fly inverted.

A lot of people try the spring mounts and cheap motocrane setups but the footage is not stable. We have tried them all. We want the best image possible.
 

Tom_Willis

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That Raptor exocage is interesting. For a non-race application, it's a lot easier than having to cut up the roof, dashboard, etc., to install.
 

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FourLow

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Our system is the same used to shoot the new top gun movie. So it’s rated for over 400knots 4gs and will fly inverted.
I started following a page a few months back that has a ShotOver system mounted to the nose of an L-39. Blows my mind that that is even a possibility.
 

DoitforBMoore

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I started following a page a few months back that has a ShotOver system mounted to the nose of an L-39. Blows my mind that that is even a possibility.
Yea. The only change is the outer axis motors and the elbow is aluminum instead of carbon.

We have mounted this thing to almost anything you can think of.